How do you transition out of invented spelling?

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by Topsy, Mar 13, 2016.

  1. Topsy

    Topsy Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 13, 2016

    I am taking Fundamentals of Literacy toward my K-6 Certificate, and also sub K-6. I encounter invented spelling in K and 1st, and I think even in 2nd. I know not to correct invented spelling, but I am curious: how and when do you move a child from, say, the invented spelling of "skul" to the correct spelling of "school"?

    Is it that once you teach them a red word or a word family, they are expected to begin writing that word correctly from then on?

    And/or: is it expected that with frequent reading and workshop activities, they gradually learn to spell correctly?

    Also, there have been times when a child comes up to me and will ask something like, "How do I spell 'quiet'?" and I will say, "Let's sound it out. Let's stretch it and listen for the sounds..." but the student is not buying it. He or she will say, "No, I want to know the RIGHT way to spell it." In that case, I say, "Let's think about the sounds first, and then I will tell you what letters need to be added..." Student patiently complies, but usually just really wants me to cut to the chase and spell it.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2.  
  3. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Cohort

    Joined:
    May 31, 2011
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    15

    Mar 13, 2016

    Once they learn the spelling patterns, what phonemes make what sounds and spelling rules, they move from inventive spelling to more precise spelling.
     
  4. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    841

    Mar 14, 2016

    From what I've read and heard in the research and how I've applied it, invented spelling is a natural precursor to accurate spelling, but correcting spelling isn't necessarily to be avoided. It's more of a matter of how to correct the spelling. The students are curious to learn how to spell correctly. As you mentioned above, scaffolding is a recommended procedure, keeping in mind, of course, that phonics only works 30% of the time at the most. In informal writing, especially in journals, I would respond back in a note that integrated a misspelled word or two, spelled correctly by myself. Something I'd do (that's not in any research I've seen), I'd highlight the word in a different ink color. I would use a calmer color, such as blue or green, rather than red (the color tip I learned at a workshop) so that it didn't appear to look like criticism of the student's writing. I don't recommend always saying, "Look it up in the dictionary", although I wouldn't avoid that resource entirely, especially with older elementary students. An idea for that is to use a picture dictionary with less words; if the student knows the beginning couple of letters, it might be easily found. Word/Word Perfect, on a computer, can be useful for the student to type in the word in question. Very helpful is a list of words the student recently learned to spell; a few days ago, I was actually thinking about this procedure. I wonder if a file card box would be useful for this, with a new word added to a card and placed in alphabetical order (for extra practice in alphabetical order). Vocabulary words with a student created definition or sentence could also be kept in that file. I've also heard of students creating a word wall with newly learned words. When a student learns to spell a word, s/he writes it on some type of shaped card (like perhaps an umbrella for April) and placed on the word wall. I've found letter tiles to be an extremely helpful procedure; easily constructed from the back of cereal boxes, although I bought mine at Wal-Mart years ago. Egg cartons, 2 of each letter, 2-3 sets of tiles per hole, are what I found work best for storage. I'd recommend using words the students have discovered and instructing the class or group to form a new word by changing a letter.
     
  5. Topsy

    Topsy Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 15, 2016

    I think I found something! I was looking at the word "quiet" that I used in my first post, and how I often see "kw" in invented spellings for words that begin with "qu."

    I wondered if there actually ARE any words that begin with "kw."

    Looked it up in Cambridge Dictionary Online and Dictionary.com, and there are only two:
    Kwanzaa
    kwashiorkor (a disease caused by insufficient protein in the diet)

    So, could I tell students who use "kw" in their invented spellings of "qu" words that, in the English language, words that have the "kw" sound start with "qu"?

    Reminder, I'm a sub, so should I just leave it alone for the classroom teacher to address when he/she (may have) planned to address it?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Mar 15, 2016

    How long are you subbing for? If the regular teacher left you lesson plans, you should follow those.
     
  7. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    841

    Mar 16, 2016

    I agree with czacza, you might be responsible for following the regular teacher's procedures, unless perhaps you are a long-term sub. Probably the P would be the best resource to answer that question. Otherwise, if I were the teacher, yes, I would show the class the only 2 words with "kw"; I would then use letter tiles, as a class or small group, to invent and correct other words with the /kw/ sound, encouraging the class to come up with most of the words to try and spell. I might, depending on the class, even look at respelled dictionary pronunciations of /kw/ words, to reinforce conventional spelling of /kw/ and phonetic respelling concepts. If time allowed, I would even stretch this a bit further; I would throw in a lesson to learn about Kwanzaa and kwashiorkor by possibly arranging a quick telephone or videophone interview with a doctor about kwashiorkor, and even have a parent teach about Kwanzaa, since that will allow the students to hear the word spoken in context. Another thought is to have the students on the lookout for this conventional spelling. When they line up quickly for lunch, a student posts the word quickly by the door. When they need to work quietly, have them post the word on their desks. As a teacher, I would be on the lookout for a few fun words, such as quandary or quadrangle. When the students giggle over learning such odd-sounding new words, it increases their phoneme awareness; (humor gains quick access to long term memory and builds extra connections in the brain).
     
  8. Topsy

    Topsy Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 16, 2016

    So if a child comes up to me and asks me how to spell something, and is not satisfied with stretching out the word and inventing spelling, I'm thinking I should encourage them to do the best they can and take it up with their teacher the next day (I'm a daily sub so far, although I've several 2-day and a handful of 3- and 4-day assignments).

    OK, got it.

    But in addition to Obadia and mkbren's posts (thank you!), are there other ways that early elementary teachers transition their students out of invented spelling?
     
  9. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    841

    Mar 17, 2016

    There are varying philosophies concerning this, but in most cases, there is not one hard fast rule. I was just making some general suggestions that a teacher might follow. When I first started teaching, I thought teaching was like following a recipe in a cookbook; do this and that will result. Well, my first assignment was as an aide in a classroom for students with learning differences, and my understanding quickly began to change. Learning only occurs from within a student's brain, and it doesn't just transfer from a teacher to a student. The tricky thing about invented spelling is that there is no transition period; it's a continual learning process. It's the same procedure adults use when a word "doesn't look right"; it's just that with first-third graders, the process is more noticeable. The student eventually compares an invention to conventional spelling received from a variety of possible sources. Immediately the brain reconfigures the spelling of a multitude of other words, not just words with the same phonemes, and even new words that will eventually be attempted. In your specific example, this student is ready to transition to a more conventional spelling for that word (which again will explode into a multitude of new learning concerning many words). If a student asked me how to spell a specific word, and I was just a 1-3 day substitute without further instruction on how to expand the situation, I would scaffold the student into the specific spelling. I keep scaffolding quick and simple (a couple of minutes or less). It might lead to use of another resource (as mentioned above) or I might respell the word correctly for the student. After I respell it, I would still scaffold the student's observation of the respelling.

    Example: The student spells "kwit" for "quiet".
    Me: You aren't sure that's how you spell "quiet"?
    Student: No.
    Me: You had a clever idea. Explain to me how you came up with these letters.
    Student: "Kw" sounds like /kw/. I heard an /ie/ sound, so I wrote an "i". There's a /t/ sound at the end.
    Me: What part doesn't look right?
    Student: It looks like the word /quit/.
    Me: Let's say it slowly.
    Together: /kwi et/.
    Student: Should I put another letter there?

    Etc.....Eventually, once the student reaches a stalemate, I would show the conventional spelling or guide in using a resource. My example is possibly a little longer than I might take on a such a situation; I included several possibilities that might occur within scaffolding.
     
    Topsy likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ally06,
  2. iiadeducation,
  3. texnoli
Total: 417 (members: 5, guests: 384, robots: 28)
test