How do you teach students in Highschool ( special education ) ?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by teacher girl, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. teacher girl

    teacher girl Comrade

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    Sep 3, 2011

    I am still in my special education teacher program. I have a year left- Please forgive my ignorance but I use this forum to learn-lol. In my state you take a reading assessment test-- basically one that asesses whether you can teach someone how to read to obtain licensure as a special education teacher.

    Ok, for little kids ( elementary/special ed) I know phonemic awareness and phonics are essential and you have to teach them basic reading skills because of how young they are. but for highschool ( special education) - wouldn't they already know that stuff? Or what is it like teaching Highschool special education? Are you like a resource teacher/ where the kids come to you at a certain block.. or do you follow them around like inclusion ?
     
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  3. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

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    Sep 3, 2011

    It really depends on what you teach and where you are. I know teachers who do follow their kids around all day and are pretty much supposed to support them in their regular classes, but I also know teachers who teach study skills/organization all day, or some who just have students in their room when they need help. It would really depend. In my job, I will be teaching science to general AND special ed students... I am both the content teacher and the special ed teacher for that room.

    With reading... again, it depends on the student. You could have kids who don't really know how to read in high school. If that's the case, they are usually instructed by the special ed teacher using some kind of intervention program (many schools around me use Read 180). If they are REALLY low or MR, they might even be practicing sight words or functional words. Some students can read fairly well but their comprehension isn't all that great. You would probably spend a lot of time teaching reading strategies, study skills, etc.
     
  4. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Sep 3, 2011

    It does really depend on the students you have on your caseload. There are students in high school who are low level readers and they are using intervention programs, which differ from district to district. You might spend 3 hours/periods per day where you are spending your time in Gen Ed. supporting kids. But you may also have a class or two that just may be resource reading.(reading intervention). The best bet is that you'd be doing a combination of things throughout the day.
     
  5. MotherGoose

    MotherGoose Rookie

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    Sep 3, 2011

    I am teaching 5 resource classes, doing inclusion support 1 class period, and only 1 OFF period. I also have a caseload of 13 kids to manage.
     
  6. Teach36

    Teach36 Rookie

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    Sep 5, 2011

    I think my high school students will only respond to materials which look age-appropriate. If the materials look babyish, they will only "buy" into using these later in the year, when everybody gets settled.
     
  7. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Sep 5, 2011

    That's normal. Actually your case load is light. It will get better!
     

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