How do you teach procedures / rules / expectations?

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by pwhatley, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 6, 2009

    I am already working on next year, and I want to have a MUCH better year! I would love to see how you teach your classroom procedures / rules / expectations / consequences - including lesson plans and rules / procedures / expectations / consequences lists, if possible! Last year was horrific for me, and although I have been told that most of what I did would work great at a school with admin support, actual behavioral expectations for students, etc., I want to see what other teachers are doing. Any and all help is greatly appreciated!
     
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  3. Go 4th

    Go 4th Habitué

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    Jun 6, 2009

    I just pm'd you a bunch of things that I found last year on here and a couple of other places. I hope you find them useful. I didn't want to post them since they weren't mine originally. :)
     
  4. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Thanks!
     
  5. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    Jun 6, 2009

    I use a powerpoint with all of the procedures and routines listed (fifth graders love powerpoints). I also model, model, model, everything that I expect them to do. The first day usually sets the tone for the rest of the year.
     
  6. nattles19

    nattles19 Comrade

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    I do a PowerPoint as well and towards the end of the first week, we play a Jeopardy-like game on PowerPoint. I use this method to review at the end of science units, so it introduces them to the routine AND reinforces rules and procedures.
     
  7. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

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    Jun 7, 2009

    Nattles19, I like the Jeopardy idea!

    I've been reading the Daily 5, and I like their idea of building "stamina" and "muscle memory". I plan do do a lot of modeling of appropriate/inappropriate that first week with some student volunteers, and then practice doing it the right way several times.

    I would also recommend Angela Powell's the Cornerstone - I've just been reading it and there is a great section on independent work. That's where I struggle every year - they are awesome when I am center stage, but when I release them to work on their own, some really "get it" and some "don't". These two books have given me some strategies for teaching that behavior - *fingers crossed* :)
     
  8. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Jun 8, 2009

    I'm not sure I'd recommend powerpoints for 1st graders. They are still in the stage where they need real life experiences. Words on paper (or a screen) aren't going to help them much.

    I definitely recommend "the Daily Five" -it talks a lot about building community- which needs to be your priority if you want a better year.

    First off, sit down with the kids from Day 1, and ask THEM what rules they think they need to have, why they need those rules, and HOW to follow them. Ask them what the consequences should be for breaking their rules. Write down all their ideas, and then, still with the children, compile them into a few simple rules, with clear consequences. Keep it posted for everyone to see and refer to.

    Next, role-play following/not following the rules, so that the kids are totally clear on what to do/what not to do.

    Doing all this gives the kids ownership. And you won't ever hear them say, "I didn't know!" or "That's not fair!" If one of the rules/consequences isn't working, call another meeting and hash it out with the kids.

    Hope this helps a little.
     
  9. cmgeorge626

    cmgeorge626 Companion

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    Jun 8, 2009

    I agree, PowerPoints would have my beginning of the year 1st graders crawling all over the room! By the end of the year you could do that sort of thing though.

    I too, use a lot of role-play of the rules and consequences (both following and not following). I LOVE PowerTeaching's (now called Whole Brain Teaching) rules and explanations. Their website is under construction right now, but you can watch videos of the founder explaining the rules and how to introduce them to your class on YouTube. Just search "PowerTeaching." My kids learned my class rules in 1 day - SERIOUSLY!

    As far as procedures go, I've found that a LOT of repetition and consistency are key! Also, making a game out of things is helpful. For instance, our kids have to line up in alphabetical order to go to lunch. I line them up in the correct order and tell them to look at their neighbor in front and behind. Then I send them to their seats and call them back to line up in order. We do this over and over with lots of praise and help until they get it. They love it when I sneak it on them during the middle of a story or lesson. As they get faster and more accurate I give them a small treat like a sticker or smelly.

    Sorry this was so long...hope it helped?!?
     
  10. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    Jun 8, 2009

    I would not recommend PowerPoint for 1st graders either, but I teach fifth so it's much different. They are able to sit for a little longer than first graders.
     
  11. MissKH81

    MissKH81 Rookie

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    Jun 8, 2009

    I recommend The First Days of School by Harry Wong. It has excellent ideas that are applicable across many grade levels.
     
  12. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Jun 9, 2009

    Tools for Teaching's Prefered activity time works well as an incentive for moving quickly in transitions for first graders.

    I have used both quick art lessons and a variety of other lessons but the hands down prefered activity this year is freeze dance.
     
  13. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I googled this, but all I found was a manual for college teachers. Where do I find this?
     

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