How do you teach poetry to 3rd graders?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by PinkLily, May 8, 2007.

  1. PinkLily

    PinkLily Companion

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    May 8, 2007

    I have decided to write poems about mom as one of my Mother's Day projects in class. Today we read a handout about how to write "Mother's Day Poetry" and we read an example. The rhyming pattern was ABCB. The students understood this, but they were having difficulty coming up with their own verses. We made a list of some rhyming words to help them out, but they still seem to be having trouble. Does anyone have any advice as to how I can help them write beautiful Mother's Day poems?
     
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  3. oasis

    oasis Rookie

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    May 8, 2007

    I highly recommend ditching the rhyming patterns and opting for non-rhyming poems such as Haiku, Cinquain, and/or Acrostic. I actually just did this with my class last week, and we created bookmarks with the poems on them, which they then colored and I laminated. They turned out beautifully!

    For the rules on these types of poems (which are really easy and fast to teach & learn) just type them into a search engine.

    I hope this is helpful!
     
  4. Amers

    Amers Cohort

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    May 9, 2007

    Haikus are great. If you still want to do the ABCB pattern, what about brainstorming some sentences about their moms before writing. Not sure how this will work with your 3rd graders, but it might be worth a try if the problem is lack of ideas vs. problems with rhyming.
     
  5. PinkLily

    PinkLily Companion

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    May 10, 2007

    Thanks for the ideas. I was actually quite surprised by the poems that some of my kids wrote. Some of the poems were really good and others not so much. It's really obvious which students have a way with words. Either way, I am sure that all the moms will be happy with the poem they receive on Sunday. Thanks again.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 13, 2007

    Don't do rhyming poetry- even published poets will tell you it's the hardest. Kids' rhymes are often forced and do nothing to elevate the quality of the writing. Have them write from the heart, sing beautiful language, similes, putting big feelings in a few words...
     
  7. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

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    May 13, 2007

    Yes, I agree. I had my 2nd graders write " a poem for mom" and they wrote freely from their hearts and minds (the same thing they've been learning all year). My kids were good at writing poetry by last week (rhyming and non-rhyming) because we just finished a poetry unit in writing which went well. I think if I was to limit them to rhyming poems or ABCB poems, then they would probably have a hard time. Next week, I plan to introduce them to Acrostic poems and Haiku's since they are doing so well with poetry. I want to boost up the poetry writing a little bit.
     
  8. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    May 13, 2007

    I think that giving the students the option of rhyming in their own poems. Indeed, you should expose them to rhyming poetry, and encourage them to write rhyming poetry. But, allowing them to make the choice might be helpful. You could also consider working with groups to write a rhyming poem. This way, they would have more brainsorming power, you could help the groups easier than trying to make rounds to each child, if so many are struggling, you provide leadership oppurtunities, encourage cooperation, encourage student to student teaching, and still go over the concepts which you want your students to understand. If you still see some of your students struggling you could give them some one on one while the other groups are working. So many kids tend to have a distaste for poetry and we should give them as positive experiences as we can.
     

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