How Do You Stand Out from the Pack?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Ms. I, Oct 31, 2010.

  1. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Oct 31, 2010

    All us substitutes are vying for sub jobs. Unfortunately, there's less assignments than there probably are substitutes in our districts. So...how do YOU make yourself stand out from the pack other than handing out business cards? :)

    Fortunately, I have my own district email set up. Ahh, the tiny perk of being a long-term sub! So there's times where I'll send out mass emails (to teachers) to make myself be known out there. (I can't really use my own personal email because the district's spam blocker will block me.)

    I've never done this yet, but I see that some subs put their info on the teacher lounge whiteboard.
     
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  3. azure

    azure Companion

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    Oct 31, 2010

    1. Follow the teachers' lesson plans. (Teachers tell me that's one reason they request me. My thought is always, "Well, what else would I do??!!) Apparently there are lots of subs who don't.

    2. Leave a detailed note.

    3. Leave the room orderly.

    4. Grade papers (unless there are instructions not to).
     
  4. Momma C

    Momma C Comrade

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    Oct 31, 2010



    I am a classroom teacher -- and I do not envy the job of a sub. :hugs: Our district begs for subs. We have actually had to combine classes due to lack of subs. What makes a sub "stand out" in our school is: 1) a sincere attempt at trying to follow the instructions left by the classroom teacher. I say "attempt" because I know there are cases where sometimes you just can't get the cooperation from everyone. 2) not allowing the kids to tear up the classroom. 3) leave the room in at least the same condition (papers, etc.) as you came into it. :D
     
  5. substitutesftw

    substitutesftw Companion

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    Oct 31, 2010

    I just generally try to do a really good job at subbing, speak to the staff and appear friendly, and make myself available if they need me. It's worked well so far!

    One of the things I do that I know for sure teacher's appreciate is making sure the room is clean. I always leave 5 or 10 minutes before the bell for students to pick up trash on the floor, straighten desks, organize the books on the bookshelves, etc. I also straighten the teacher's desk and leave a note clearly visible. I had one teacher last week say, "Oh, I'm so glad you can sub for me! You always leave everything neat and where it's supposed to be."

    The truth is I'm not a very organized or neat person. My desk at home is cluttered! But I always make sure I clean up everything in the rooms before I leave. If I have time, I'll even go around and pick up loose pieces of trash and pencils off the floor that students missed. I know what it is to walk into a clean classroom ("This is an organized teacher... they must be good!") verses walking into a messy one. Teachers appreciate a little of the effort. I can imagine wincing when you walk into a messy classroom the day after you had a sub. No matter what the note says or what the students say, you probably won't have a great impression of the sub. On the other hand, walking into a clean, organized classroom will make it much easier to believe the sub handled everything well.

    I went into a class a couple of weeks ago subbing for a teacher I know well. She had another sub the previous day and her desk was a MESS. I knew she would never leave her desk like that, so it must have been the other sub. I was honestly baffled. As a teacher, I can understand a somewhat messy desk because you have papers, forms and other things. But what does a sub have on the desk except a few notes? There was no reason not to keep everything in a neat stack. Every sub should at least leave the teacher's desk pretty neat (unless, I suppose, it was messy and that's the way the teacher wants it).
     
  6. substitutesftw

    substitutesftw Companion

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    Oct 31, 2010


    I know!

    I swear I had a teacher tell me that the sub just let her students play games all day when she was out. Not the kind of games with cards or game boards that you can sit and play. Games that required running and jumping and hiding inside the classroom. She said she left a lesson and the sub must have just said, "Never mind that. Who's up for a game of freeze tag?" I couldn't imagine.
     
  7. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Oct 31, 2010

    Yes guys! :thumb: I assumed leaving the room clean at the end, following plans as closely as possible, & leaving a summarized note was a given.

    I was specifically talking about what, if anything, do you do that's unique or creative to make teachers notice that you're not just "another sub"? :)
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Oct 31, 2010

    In my school board, schools are able to put several subs on their "preferred list"--they will be called first for any positions at our school. They way they become preferred is to be reliable, have good classroom skills, follow lesson plans, go above-and-beyond (asking what else they can do to help out). We aren't able to request subs who aren't on our preferred list (if they are busy, the calls just go out in queue), so 'advertising' to the teachers isn't any help in my board.
     
  9. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Oct 31, 2010

    1. Gladly accepting last minute assignments. Calling a sub when everything is planned and organized is one thing. Needing a sub right now due to an emergency or sudden illness is another and teachers REALLY appreciate a sub that will not only answer the call, but will get to the school as quick as they can (within reason, of course).

    2. Taking time to teach or extend the lesson plan instead of just following it. Again, this is a tremendous help when teachers need a sub unexpectedly. My very first sub assignment was for a middle school teacher who got a call on Monday morning that her sister in Chicago was had fallen critically ill. This teacher was very organized and had already written her lesson plans for every class for the entire week on the board, so that part was covered. Unfortunately, her sister did not recover and the teacher had to extend her absence to help make arrangements and attend the funeral. When I called her on Friday evening to ask what she wanted me to do on Monday, she said "There are plenty of extra practice problems in the back of the book, just have them work on those." I said I would be happy to do that, but I wondered if she wanted me to go ahead and begin teaching the next unit to the students. She was shocked to have a sub that not only was comfortable with math, but was actually willing (and able) to teach it as well. When she did return, her students were right on pace, rather than being several days behind. That doesn't always happen, of course, but any extension you can do of the lesson plan to make kids actually THINK about the lesson is a plus.

    3. Going above and beyond what is expected. I've had a few short-term assignments (for 1-2 weeks) in different classes. During those assignments, I helped with lunchroom duty, hall duty and traffic duty in the afternoon - just as the regular teacher would have. I've also helped cover for a 2nd teacher during the planning period of the 1st teacher I was subbing for. This made a big impression on the principal of a high school I subbed for often. I don't think it is any coincidence that I was offered a regular teaching position after that principal was promoted to Director of Personnel in the Central Office.

    4. Bring enrichment activities and keep kids focused! I always bring a binder with several riddles and lateral thinking problems in it. If students finish the assignment left by Regular Teacher, I fill the extra time with these enrichment activities that keep the kids focused and entertained, but also help them expand their thinking a little.

    There are other things, like actually following the lesson plans, keeping the kids under control and leaving a detailed note for the Regular Teacher that - as you said - should be standard procedure, but are often often overlooked or ignored by many subs.
     
  10. substitutesftw

    substitutesftw Companion

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    Oct 31, 2010

    You'd be surprised. I have heard many times that subs don't follow the lesson, don't leave the room clean and do several other "no-brainers" the wrong way.


    Those are pretty much the things that I do and I have a pretty good reputation in my district, and most of my work comes from repeat assignments.

    One other thing that I think makes a good impression to other staff is leading a straight, quiet line down the hallway. It's another no-brainer. I'm a big stickler about good lines. If a class doesn't do a good job in the hallway, I chastise them when we get back to class and encourage them to improve. It's one thing to maintain good classroom management in the actual classroom, but the hallway (or restroom) is a different story. Unless someone visits the class, they have very little knowledge of how you're handling the class. But walking down the hallway is like a big poster to the whole school about how you handle students. Think of all the teachers, classes and other staff members you encounter as you're leading the class from their room to the cafeteria, or back to class from the library. I've had teachers compliment the line I'm leading down the hallway, and then meet me later in the day and ask if I can sub for them on a later date.
     
  11. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Oct 31, 2010

    If subs are not following lesson plans and such then they must need better training, screening, interviews or something. I'm sure some districts would never tolerate such. One district I would have liked to work in, required an interview and evaluations to sub, even though I was already approved to teach there. Districts need to step up their requirements because there's no excuse for that.

    I'm just myself. Along with being known for being super strict and managing classes in the tough inner city schools (took me years to get there) I teach the students as if they were my own.

    I go in detail with the lessons, think of different ways to explain concepts, make the lessons engaging, and basically always add my own flavor or teaching style to the teacher's plans.

    I teach through storytelling and lots of concrete examples from different sources so the kids will "own the information" using their own background knowledge and their own imagination.

    Of course I did this as a regular teacher as well, but I never slack just because I'm subbing. If I'm not excited about the lesson, the kids won't be, and I'd be bored to death.

    When a principal or teacher walks in, they spread the word to the staff, and that's one reason I was highly requested and called an "awesome teacher" not sub.

    But teachers would be amazed that I didn't have my own classroom and that I chose not to return to public schools, and they tried to convince me that I absolutely better apply and work in another public school. :help:

    So basically, I just love the art of teaching and being creative and unique with the lessons.
     
  12. substitutesftw

    substitutesftw Companion

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    Oct 31, 2010

    Great post, Cerek!


    Another thing I think impressive teachers and staff is being ok in the event that you don't have lesson plans. Not panicking and keeping kids busy and productive while thinking on your feet, or coming prepared with something extra.
     
  13. John Lee

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    Nov 1, 2010

    I guess I don't do much to "stand out!" other than looking/acting the part of an actual teacher. It's kinda amazing how many substitutes there are out there, who don't even look the part of a teacher sorry to say. They look disheveled or a bit unkempt, or they act in a manner that's not teacher-like (e.g. not calm, unprofessional, lackadaisical, in over their head, dense, vacant).

    I also try to be pleasant to fellow staff, parents when I'm walking through the halls etc. (smile, nod). A lot of subs (and teachers too amazingly) just sorta hole-up in the room or walk by like you're nobody.

    I don't do either of these things just to stand out though. I just do 'em because that's what I do.

    Also, being that I am primarily in elementary education--the fact that I'm a male teacher probably stands out. ;)
     
  14. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Great info guys. Yes, I'm sure some subs don't even do the basics of following the plan (well), leaving the room clean, & writing a note at the end.

    John Lee, I agree as well. I don't know how it is at others' districts, but the teachers themselves are kind of tacky, so w/ the subs, it's a toss up of how their appearance will be.
     
  15. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    I'm huge on the lines also. A few of the schools where I work have open floor plans where each room leads into the next. It's next to impossible not to disturb another class just by walking through.

    I've found that some kids just don't seem to know how to walk in line--especially the little ones. Perhaps their regular teacher doesn't put much effort into the practice. I've always sworn that as soon as I get my own class, we will do line drills throughout the first week or two of school. I have no problem with using "PE" time to make them walk along the lines on the basketball court as training.
     
  16. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Nov 14, 2010

    Many good ideas here, but sometimes it is not enough; especially if one is at a district with many recent retirees or laid off teachers.

    Nearly every school had a few teachers who were recently on staff who are now subbing.

    These will usually be the first teachers called regardless of how organized an "outside' sub is.

    I work for three districts, yet only one offers work nearly every day. The other two districts with more recent layoffs and lower enrollment only offer jobs about 10-15% of the time.

    Thank goodness for this 3rd district or I would be searching for a new career this year.
     
  17. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Nov 14, 2010

    I used to sub at the school where I actually attended elementary school back in the 60's.
    I am still in this district, but have not worked at this school in seven years.
    I was always thorough and organized. I was also well liked by the students.

    You can imagine how disturbed I was to find a list of the top 25 preferred subs for this school on the teacher's desk, with my name not on the list.

    I learned long ago that my best efforts are not going to land me a job, but I still give it my best as a matter of pride and doing the right thing, despite being an earthworm on the evolutionary scale of school employees.
     
  18. The Substitute

    The Substitute Rookie

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    Nov 23, 2010

    Hi Mrs. I,

    Great Question! I’ve been subbing for 5 years in a district that was small to begin with and that continues to shrink due to ongoing classroom and school closures. To make matters worse, our district has a huge sub list and does a purely rotational callout (at least in theory) which results in less than 1 and ½ days a week for most subs.

    Lately, I’ve been averaging 4 call outs a week, and I generally get more than my fair share. Here’s some of what I do (I offer it up for comparison to what others are doing)

    I try to always do the basics well. Following the lesson plan, cleaning the room, marking etc… most days there is just no excuse for not following the basics, but I regularly hear from a number of my permanent teacher friends about how many subs fail to do something as simple as this.

    I try to treat the classroom like it is my own – Whenever I teach a lesson, I ask myself if I would be happy with the students understanding if I had to come back and teach the next day.

    Leave it like you’d like to find it - If I was coming in the next day, would all the materials I need be prepared and ready to go? Art supplies out? Photo-copying done? Day plan updated?

    Leave a great note – the secret to a great note is to keep it detailed but short and to the point. Max 1 page (barring the unusual). I tend to write as I go during the day, that way I don’t have to spend 15 minutes typing after school and possibly forget the details.

    Do a visual survey of the room at 3:00pm. I actually like to stand in the doorway and look at the room like a returning teacher. What catches my eye? What looks disorganized? I try to spend a maximum of 5-10 minutes straightening up, but I make every minute count. And if I happen to have a few people in for detention at 3 you can bet that they are going to be doing the lion’s share of the cleanup.

    As important as these basics are (and I think we can all agree that they get noticed) you can go beyond with some “social marketing”…

    Go Beyond – Always try to find one way to do something thoughtful and unusual in the classroom that makes the teacher’s life easier. When it gets noticed it makes an impact. One thing I do when ever I have a spare block and my marking is done is to try to tackle something in the classroom in desperate need of doing. If everything is taken care of I go knock on doors and offer to take another teacher’s marking. This act almost always makes a great impression.

    Treat the kids like your own – Experience has shown me that students tend to prefer a sub that is firm but still demonstrates that he or she cares. I strive to make as many personal connections with my students as possible during the day. As much as teachers notice a tidy classroom with all the marking done, they really notice when their students cheer upon hearing that you’ll be their substitute teacher when their regular teacher will be away next week!

    Don’t be a ship in the night – too many subs sail in quietly, do their work and then leave without a peep. When you are at a school you’ve got to network. Networking starts with being visible. A few of the things I do each day include:

    Learning the office secretary’s name and then using it. Many office secretaries are given the responsibility of calling in subs for the principal. Treat them with courtesy and respect and foster a positive relationship with them.

    Be visible – I usually start my morning by introducing myself to my teaching neighbours. I let them know who I’m in for and then tell them that if there is anything they need please don’t hesitate to come and see me across the hall. I also try to avoid holing myself up in my room. I get down to the staffroom and have a cup of coffee with my teaching peers. If I have a pile of marking to do then so much the better – I’ll do it in the staff room and other staff members will see me getting the marking done (which often gets noted and passed along to administration or the returning teacher)

    Be professional – I don’t care how casually other teachers at the school dress, I always have a neatly ironed dress shirt and casual jacket on. First appearances matter.

    Be early – and speaking of first appearances, few things look better than you pulling in to the parking lot at the same time as the principal. It not only gives you a jump on the day, but it gets noticed and says something about your work ethic.

    Always introduce yourself to the principal and vp. Never go through a day without introducing yourself to these 2 people who often have direct input over substitute callouts. I generally introduce myself in the morning and then thank them for having me in before I leave.

    Keep in touch – This week I’m writing a brief handwritten note to a principal that I worked for quite frequently last year but that I haven’t heard from so far this year. I know she changed schools so I’m going to congratulate her on the promotion and remind her that I’m still available and looking forward to working with her at her new school.

    Anyhow, these are a few of the things that I do. I just thought I’d throw them out there.
     
  19. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Nov 23, 2010

    These things:) Sorry, I hacked up your post, but I wanted to reply to a few points

    I like the idea of doing marking in the lounge. Most of my jobs are lower elementary, so there's not a lot of marking to be done, but you're right. That's a good place to take that kind of thing. Usually I don't even eat lunch in the lounge because I feel awkward. There's usually a discussion going on that I'm not part of, and nobody likes someone who butts into the conversation.

    Agree about the appearance. Unless I'm at the State Preschool, I never, ever wear jeans, even on "spirit Friday" where all the teachers wear jeans and the school t-shirt. As a sub, we're always in a different place, so one can exist with two or three nice pairs of pants and a few tops.

    Early around here can be bad. We are required to be there a half hour before the bell rings. Too much earlier than that, and the office manager isn't even in. In fact, sometimes they're not even there at that time. I reported to one job where another staff member let the four subs wating outside the office in. When the office manager got there, she was annoyed that we'd been let in.

    How do you find the Principal and VP? If they're not sitting in a marked office, it could be anyone. What I really appreciate as a sub is when a Principal comes around early in the morning to the classes where she knows there's a sub. Coming in, loudly telling the sub in front of the sudents what a good class he or she is taking over goes a long way in terms fo behavior.
     
  20. The Substitute

    The Substitute Rookie

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    Nov 23, 2010

    Hi Jenn,

    I totally know what you mean about some staffrooms not always being the most warm and inviting places for a visiting teacher – trying to start a conversation can at times feel a little bit like you are out on a street corner with a tin cup in your hand asking for spare change. Still, I tend to pound away at it and over time I find I usually make some inroads and develop some good friendships.

    My district also has a few schools that don’t open the office until ½ an hour before the day starts – I don’t think they had substitute teachers in mind when they decided on the office schedule.

    Regarding finding the principal and vice principal, I try to do the following:

    When I get the call out I quickly go to the school website and write down their names and the name of the office secretary.

    When I get to the school I stick my nose in the office to see if I can locate them and then do a very quick hello.

    If I don’t find them there I tend to look on the school layout sheet that a number of schools provide.

    If I’m still not in luck I’ll ask the office secretary or one of my colleagues across the hall from my class as to where their offices or classrooms are.
     
  21. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Nov 26, 2010

    Hi The Substitute! Yes, it's all great info. I've been a sub for about several yrs, so I do know about those things you've listed. The reason I started this thread is because my 32-school dist is only giving me only 1 day a week of work on a regular basis & I wanted to see if I'm missing anything that I don't already know. I also wanted to see if there's anything else new these days, but those are great reminders.
     
  22. The Substitute

    The Substitute Rookie

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    Nov 27, 2010

    Hi Ms. I,

    One day a week – ugh! That must be incredibly frustrating.

    One other little trick that I have started doing that seems to be working is leaving magnetized business cards with my contact information. Basically, instead of (or in addition to) leaving my business card on their desk, I also leave a business card magnet (bought the magnetized backing at Staples) attached to their filing cabinet, on the fridge in the staff room, and with the office secretary.

    Shameless? You bet! But I find that I really enjoy being able to pay my mortgage and work just isn’t falling off the tree and into my lap like it used to in years past – more and more if I want to get more than my fair share of work I’ve got to make myself noticed.

    One other thing that I always do is at the end of my note for the day I say:

    “If you have any questions about the day, please don’t hesitate to give me a call at (cell number) or (home number).

    All the best…

    Name
    Employee Number (something they need to call me in when you work in my district)”

    If I can think of anything else that I do I’ll try to post it as well – I’d love to see you get more than a day a week. Conversely, if you’ve come up with anything above and beyond what I’ve mentioned I’d love to hear about it as well. I’m always looking for new ways to market myself!
     
  23. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Nov 27, 2010

    The Substitute, thanks again for more info. Yes, there's just way too many subs & too few jobs. My dist uses SubFinder online & 99% of the time I check, it says nothing's available. I've read how people check to see if there's jobs during wee hours of the morning like between 3am & 4:30am. Maybe I should wake up & try that for a week to see if I can grab anything up.

    I even asked my district's subcaller, but she says she wishes there was a secret she could tell me.

    The thing is, I'm sure I'm one of the longest (if not the longest) working subs for my dist, so I SHOULD have priority...so much for that! :mad: Technically, I've been a sub for them since Jan 1999, but during those yrs, I was a special ed teacher for another dist for a yr, did 1 yr of student teaching (I have 2 credentials along w/ my Masters degree in special ed), & of course I never worked a solid M-F any entire school yr, so I figure I've been a sub for about 7-8 yrs total.

    Yes, I print up business cards (haven't done magnetized ones though), even flyers that I've put in all the mailboxes in the teachers' lounges. I even have a district email set up & literally emailed ALL the teachers in the entire dist stating a catchy message about if they want a reliable, organized, experienced sub to not hesitate to request me. I stated that I have a Masters, etc. too.

    I've contacted 10 other districts, including 4 I used to sub for as well, but no one's hiring for subs these days. See, all the laid off teachers are returning to subbing, so they of course get all the priority jobs & knocks out the subs' chances of being called for jobs. It's a bleak, dreary situation out there!

    I just finished my coursework for my Speech-Language Pathology Assistant license, so hopefully, I can quit subbing soon & get a good job at a hospital or something. I'm also trying to get into grad school to earn a 2nd Mastes degree. I've begun switching to the speech-language pathology field to be a speech-language pathologist & I applied to this 1 school, hoping to get an acceptance letter.
     
  24. The Substitute

    The Substitute Rookie

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    Nov 27, 2010

    Ms. I,

    That's brutal - I honestly thought I had it tough with subbing for 5 years, but 10 - yikes! I share in your frustration though. Good people with significant education and experience like yourself should not have to experience working conditions like this. Getting 1 day a week is no way to attract or retain quality on call teachers. How these districts providing 1 day a week work can think that they are doing a service to their schools, teachers or students is beyond me because it forces out or scares away quality individuals like yourself from the profession of teaching on call.

    In my district I'm a union staff representative for substitute teachers (or teachers on call, as they are referred to here). If you happen to belong to a professional organization/union you might want to ask them to lobby for subs in their next round of bargaining. Districts can limit the number of subs that they hire, which would provide something closer to a living wage for teachers in your district working on call.
     
  25. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Nov 28, 2010

    Substitute, unfortunately, I hold no kind of power regarding the treatment, results, etc. of substitutes. I have no idea when my district last hired subs, but I honestly think they need to cut those newcomers loose & retain the longtime subs & give them a lot more work.

    And another reason I'm hardly getting any work is that most teachers already have their preferred sub(s) that they like to request. For most of my yrs subbing, I've been picky & only did speech & RSP, but now that times are slow, I returned back to subbing gr K-3, so to the general ed teachers out there, I'm some sub they've never heard of before.

    I think districts should have just enough subs so that everyone's working NO LESS than 3 days a week.
     
  26. The Substitute

    The Substitute Rookie

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    Nov 28, 2010

    I SOOO agree with you on this idea. My district is small but they try to do rotational call out and keep a huge sub list, just so that they'll have a bunch of spare bodies the 1-2 days a year when they might possibly need them (like during a provincial track and field event). Basically, all the subs here are on the verge of starvation (our average income is actually below the poverty line) because it's convenient for my district to do so.
     
  27. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Nov 29, 2010

    I have never heard of a such thing as union staff representative for substitutes here in the states.
    If there are untapped sources of which I am unaware that might help us earn a decent living, I would like to learn more.

    I have been subbing since 1997, but two of my three districts combined probably call me only 15% of the time.
    Thank goodness for my third district which has found me work for 42 consecutive days.
     
  28. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Nov 29, 2010

    The districts in this regard are no different than corporations.

    They do not care that we are earning below poverty wages and are not allowed unemployment. It is all about saving money for their priorities, and we are at the bottom of the priority list.
    This will not change as long as supply is more than double the demand.
     
  29. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Nov 29, 2010

    Want to be invited back to my room for a repeat performance...
    1. leave my room clean...my sub a few weeks ago left my room with food on my computer desk. Why would you even be eating around my computer desk?

    2. leave me a note...I want to know why only 8 kids did a paper...who caused problems...what happened in the bathroom.

    3. don't discuss my students or my classroom with other teachers or parents. That is NOT your job. I am tired of hearing about my class and kiddos in the community. I spent 15 minutes telling my principal about a sub who shared too much at a football game about not only my kids but another teachers. She won't be back.


    4. make a point of talking to the secretary and the principal.

    5. the next time you are in the building, stop by and see what you can do different next time.


    6. FOLLOW my lesson plans AND my RULES!!!!!


    This is just a few of the things that you have to do to get invited back to my classroom.
     
  30. The Substitute

    The Substitute Rookie

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    Nov 30, 2010

    Hi Oldstudent,

    If you and your fellow teachers are organized into a professional body (mine is the BCTF - British Columbia Teachers Federation) then there is a very good chance that you'll have a few substitute union reps. Each school has a regular school rep, and given that subs aren't in a particular school and that subs needs are often quite different/overlooked by their fellow teachers, having reps just for subs is a very useful idea, especially given the fact that subs make up a high percentage of the teaching staff for any district. If your district does not actually have this position, you could easily request that it gets formed. After all, each school has it's own rep, so why not the subs? In my district we have 300+ subs and I'm one of the 4 substitute staff reps.
     
  31. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Nov 30, 2010

    I would think that to have union reps, one would need a union, and we do not have one.
    Additionally, I am afraid anyone who would be so so brazen as to make such a suggestion would be branded a troublemaker and become blackballed by the district.

    The irony is that to receive fair treatment and representation, you need a union; but a strong effort to form a union will blackball you because you have no union to protect your rights in an effort form a union.
     
  32. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Dec 1, 2010

    That's what I'm thinking too & it's unfortunate. Districts don't care about subs. Subs are on-call workers who don't even get benefits. If one ruffles feathers, they'll get rid of that person so fast, their head will spin & there's plenty more people who will apply to be a sub & take that person's place.
     
  33. The Substitute

    The Substitute Rookie

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    Dec 1, 2010

    I sympathize. About 30 years ago we didn't have teaching unions here either, and prinicpals weilded near demi-god like powers in an arbitrary fashion over regular teachers and subs alike. Arbirtarily letting good teachers go after 15 years because they wouldn't take on the extra 'optional' coaching duties, leaving school at the end of june and not knowing if you had a job to come back to until the last week of august... stuff like that. People here eventually got fed up and decided to get organized to improve job security and working conditions.
     

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