How do you select read-alouds?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by divey, Jul 5, 2006.

  1. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 11, 2006

    There's a lot of good suggestions here. Basically, I have seen second grade teachers read Beverly Cleary's Ramona series, Charlotte's Web, and Mr. Popper's Penguins (which students REALLY get into).. There was also a teacher at our school who read Hoot by Carl Hiassen. Time Warp Trio is also neat, yet I don't know if I'd use it for a read-aloud because it's written on their level.

    For second grade read-alouds, I'd recommend third and fourth grade level books.

    I know so many people mentioned Junie B. Jones and said this would not be the ideal read-aloud, yet Barbara Park has written some other great books like Skinnybones. That may be appropriate as well.

    Books I read in fourth grade are Walk Two Moons, The City of Ember, My Side of the Mountain, Sarah, Plain and Tall, and a variety of others, like books from Andrew Clements.
     
  2. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Yes, Bloomability is a really neat book. I also didn't mention that I am doing Ruby Holler for small groups/literature circles next year.

    My students enjoyed Walk Two Moons, yet all classes have different "personalities", I guess. :)
     
  3. 5thgraderocks

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    :eek: I love teaching 5th Grade but all of these posts identify a major problem I face everyday! We use tradebooks instead of basals to teach reading. All of us have become shrewd shoppers. When Scholastic offers a popular title for 5th Grade (IE: Number the Stars) we order six or eight copies. Last year our fifth grade team faced a real dilemma ... the kids had heard most of the books "read aloud" in a lower grade. It isn't bad to reread a few stories, but making predictions is lost!! I'm not sure what we're going to do. Does anyone have similar stories??
     
  4. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    You don't have any reading series books? Does your school recommend any specific books or authors for every grade level? It's kind of neat, but I understand why it's kind of a dilemma, too...

    I know I have not read a book to my class because they heard it in third grade, like last year's students had heard Because of Winn-Dixie. Perhaps I'd get some smaller reader books to share with my students for a basal-like reading instruction from time to time so you didn't always have to bear the pressure of finding novels for them to read.

    Maybe go for an entirely different type of assignment for your students from what younger teachers did when they read the books aloud to them. Maybe like in Jeffrey Wilhelm's books from Scholastic, they could do authentic and neat activities like putting on a press conference, a radio show, or some type of re-enactment before the class.
     
  5. divey

    divey Companion

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    Jul 12, 2006

    I love to check out lots of books in the summer...books that I never have time to read during the school year. I just finished reading an older Newberry winner book that would be good for upper elementary/middle school. It's called Rifles for Watie and it's about a boy who joins the Union army during the Civil War. I really enjoyed it!

    Lots of wonderful ideas for read-alouds for lower elementary (especially 2nd grade!). I remember lots of series that I enjoyed reading when I was little (do any of you remember the "Betsy" books? or Miss Pickerell"?) I remember reading Nancy Drew when I was little and LOVING them. Have any of you ever read that series as a read aloud? Also, don't know if the Little House series has been mentioned yet? Another of MY favorites.

    I tried to read Alice in Wonderland to my kids one year. In fact I think I was still teaching in Kindergarten at that time. I TOTALLY understand your comment about the book being "too british". It was hard for ME to understand.
     
  6. TeacingnTN

    TeacingnTN Rookie

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    Jul 12, 2006


    He does have a website. I've seen his book and it is a good resource. He doesn't really list books on his website that are good read alouds the way he does in the book. I love the idea of the rain gutter bookshelves!!
     
  7. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Wow! Thanks TeachingnTN! I have been looking for this but without much luck. He does have a link to his treasury. It's about half-way down the home page with the words "Take the gamble out of your choices for read-alouds". This is great!
     
  8. TeacingnTN

    TeacingnTN Rookie

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    And thank you for the info on where to find the treasury on his website!! I didn't see it before and it was right in front of my face!! I need to look a little better!! Thanks again!!
     
  9. SueM

    SueM New Member

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    Jul 12, 2006

    How about Mrs. PiggleWiggle? She has wonderfull cures for most common "illnesses."
     
  10. WowTeach

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    Mrs. PiggleWiggle

    I love to read Mrs. PiggleWiggle! The kids love her too!
     
  11. love_reading

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    Jul 12, 2006

    I am working on a Reading Master's and just finished up a course that pertains to this. One of our texts was Learning Under the Influence of Language and Literature: Making the Most of Read-Alouds Across the Day by Lester Laminack and Reba Wadsworth. In it, he outlines the six reasons to read-aloud each day (and incourages reading aloud 6 times every day). He also give great examples of books for each of these read-alouds as a springboard. It's a worthwhile resource and I know I will use it this year!
     
  12. Bonnie gr. 2

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    I remember Mrs. Piggle Wiggle from when I was a kid. I love her, too, but younger kids don't really get her.
     
  13. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    Jul 12, 2006

    We have had teh same problem with read alouds... The first book I read aloud when I started teaching was "Because of Winn Dixie"- The kids LOVED it (It was the year the movie came out). Suddenly everyone was reading that book to their kids (even a first grade teacher) and so that shot me reading it aloud to my kids (have found if more than 1-2 have read the book, it ruins reading it aloud).

    My kids did not like Walk Two Moons either, or Wrinkle in Time.

    This year I am starting out with Frindle, and then will move into Hatchet most likely. Then I will read something girly I guess lol! Hoping to plan my whole year in the next week while I have access to cheap books. Can anyone suggest a "girly" book that the whole class would like in fifth grade?
     
  14. propspony

    propspony New Member

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    Jul 12, 2006

    girly...

    girly? Misty of Chincoteague.. :-D I would have loved it if *my* fifth grade teacher had read it to us. You could also do some sort of marshland science project with it as well, or watch a pony penning day newscast...

    Jacob I have Loved was a favorite of mine as well, but you might lose the boys...
     
  15. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jul 12, 2006

    What about Stargirl? I haven't read it yet, but I know the girls loved it. I would love to read every book in my classroom library ... sigh .... so many books, so little time ....

    My kids were so picky last year. They did, however, really like The View From Saturday.

    I loved Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle! I just worry that the books I grew up reading seem too dated now. I think that's the problem with A Wrinkle in Time. I read every Madeline L'Engle book when I was young. I also read Misty of Chincoteague and its sequels, but kids don't seem to go for that today. I loved Nancy Drew (the old ones) and some of the Hardy Boys. Does anyone remember Cherry Ames, R.N.?
     
  16. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    One book I recommed you NOT read aloud is Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key. I had heard lots of good things about this book. The main character has a very scattered thought process (I think ADHD undiagnosed) and it can be very tough to follow. I had to quit reading it half way through the book because it made my brain hurt. He also asked his mom if he is messed up because she drank wine while she was pregnant.
     
  17. love_reading

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    Any of the Frog and Toad books...they are short chapter books. Charlotte's Web toward the end of the year. I'll Meet You at the Cucumbers...recommened from another teacher, I've never read it before myself. Mr. Putter and Tabby Paint the Porch--there are several in this series by Cynthia Rylant. Stone Fox.
     
  18. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I read one Joey Pigza book aloud and was really sorry I did. The characters are pretty nutty and not good role models. I think it is okay for individual reading, but doesn't work well for a read aloud.
     
  19. divey

    divey Companion

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    One of my friends read Stone Fox to her 2nd grade class, and didn't know the ending. The dog dies at the end and it was a very unexpected twist. She said that she (and most of her class!!) were just HORRIFIED and fighting back tears when it happened! Talk about a book you really get in to!!! ROFL!!! However, she absolutely LOVED the book and has read it to her class every year since (and fought back tears at the end each time! :D) My tear-jerker book (at least one of them) is Walk Two Moons!
     
  20. Iteachtwo

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    My second graders enjoyed the Flat Stanley books. I think there are 3 of them followed by the Flat Stanley project. They also enjoyed the E.B. White books, Charlotte's Web, Stuart Little, and Trumpet of the Swan, followed by the movies and a compare/contrast activity. I also added the "Julian" books by Ann Cameron.

    On another note, I've never read Junie B. Jones. But my students ordered it like crazy through the book clubs and it was always a favorite at the school library. Thanks for the heads up about the poor grammar. I'll be sure not to read as a read aloud.
     
  21. bonteach

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    The Girls isn't "girly", but my fifth graders (even the boys) really liked it. Amy Goldman Koss is the Author. Also Everything on a Waffle has a female protaganist.(and its really funny)
     
  22. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    I don't think there is anything wrong with enjoying a favorite book being read aloud even if they have read it independently. In fact, re-reads (or listenings in this case) can reinforce skills.
     
  23. divey

    divey Companion

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    Last night I read The Hundred Dresses and I'll Meet You at the Cucumbers (suggested on this thread :) ) Both of these would be really, really good books for 2nd grade. I love the fact that they were both only around 65 pages long but had so much to offer in regards to teachable moments! The Hundred Dresses...PERFECT for the beginning of the year and talking about bullying. I'll....Cucumbers...perfect for when your talking about using descriptive language, mental images, and introducing poetry! Proof positive that you guys know what your talking about! :D
     
  24. norogo

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    I have never read the HUndred Dresses, sounds like something I should check out.
     
  25. 5thgraderocks

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    My fifth graders love the new series (six books) called "On the Run." I thought it was excellent! We also liked "No More Dead Dogs" and strongly disliked "The Teacher's Funeral." ;)
     
  26. Aria

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    My daughter and I read a book this summer that I thought was funny and creative: Diary of a Fairy Godmother by Esme Raji Codell. It is the story of a young witch who decides she would rather practice wishcraft than witchcraft, and has a number of humorous references to fairy tales that kids would be familiar with. I am thinking I might possibly use this with my 5/6 class and combine it with a short unit on themes in fairy tales.

    I remember one of my teachers reading The Princess Bride by William Goldman to our class, and loving it. This was before the movie; the book is much better, as is often the case. I am wondering about reading this to my class as well. Not sure how it woudl tie in to the curriculum. If possible, I'd like to pick a read aloud that will support the overall theme we are working with (but I am still choosing themes).
     
  27. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    I have considered reading The Princess Bride to my 5th graders, but I wasn't sure that a) it would hold their attention and b) that it might be too long. I love the story though. What grade were you in when your teacher read it aloud?
     
  28. Aria

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    I was in 8th. Maybe I'll save it for towards the end of the year when I have a better idea about my kids' attention spans and interests.
     
  29. 2Teach_is_2Care

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    This is a great thread for us "newbies" who want to do novel studies! Thanks for all the reading suggestions. My question is: how long does it usually take to read a story aloud and do activities, questions, etc. I am trying to figure out how to "arrange" my lessons. Some books I'm looking at reading are:
    -Shiloh
    -The Whipping Boy
    -Bridge to Terabithia
    -Maniac Magee
    -Number the Stars
    -Where the Red Fern Grows
    -The Giver

    That's it so far.... :)

    Any suggestions on the order we should read these and if I should add/delete any?
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2006
  30. aprilgurlie

    aprilgurlie Rookie

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    MANIAC MAGEE!!!!!!!!!

    Every time someone asks what book to read upper elementary kids, I tell them the same thing- MANIAC MAGEE. I have NEVER met a group of kids who didn't absolutely love it. The idioms/similies/metaphors etc are beautiful in the book, and so is the message about accepting people for who they are. It has a strong racial discussion base as well- my class had many discussions about it.

    We read Spinelli all year, we couldn't get enough. Stargirl and Crash are also very good- each of these Spinelli books as a theme that it is OK and even preferable to be different. Crash really got some discussions going about bullying.

    BUT-if you MUST choose one book-MANIAC MAGEE.
     
  31. aprilgurlie

    aprilgurlie Rookie

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    Aug 16, 2006

    P.S. If you end up reading Where the Red Fern Grows aloud in your class, you and the class will be in tears at the end. You are warned!! :) Oh, and it is a pretty high reading level as well, so be careful if you are doing book clubs with it.
     

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