How Do You Say No For Next Year???

Discussion in 'General Education' started by jojothesub, Jun 1, 2013.

  1. jojothesub

    jojothesub Rookie

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    Jun 1, 2013

    Hi all,

    I have been offered a part-time foreign language teacher position (25 hours bi-weekly) in November of 2012, which I accepted. I was a little relentless before going to the interview (school has a bad reputation, it is a middle school), however, I took a chance and got the position. It turned out to be extremely challenging for me, the kids were out of control, not interested in learning a second language, did not want to be in my classroom. I had 2 classes, in one I had 35 kids, and the other 20. The second was more or less manageable, the first one was close to crazy.

    My supervisor (the Foreign Language department chair) knew about the situation before I was even hired. He even told me at the interview that some of the kids would not stay in their seats. Now, he thinks I am still doing a great job (I come up with all kinds of projects, powerpoint presentations to get the students engaged), and he is talking about my future students for next year. He is so proud of me, that I do not see how I am going to tell him that I will not be back next year. Under no circumstances, I will return to that school. I have been frustrated and stressed beyond imagination. At one point, I almost quit (around February 2013), but chose to hang on.

    I have to say that I am new to teaching, and only started subbing in March of 2012. I am also a part-time substitute teaching. When I do not teach at that school, I sub at other schools. I just had my certification in K-6 elementary education and really do not want to teach at middle schools ever. I love subbing at elementary schools, specially for 2nd and 3rd graders.

    So, to all of you, I do I say no for next year? Wasn't my supervisor supposed to ask me about my plans for next year, instead of assuming I want to come back next year?
     
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  3. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Jun 1, 2013

    Do you already have another job? I wouldn't say anything unless you do.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jun 1, 2013

    What do you mean by "relentless"? I assume that's a typo or something.

    If you're unhappy with the position, just resign. Thank the supervisor for the opportunity and let them know that you won't be back next year. That's it.

    I don't necessarily think that it's a great idea to resign from a guaranteed position when you don't have another one lined up, but I suppose you have to do what you have to do.
     
  5. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Jun 1, 2013

    When I left I told my mentor teacher and she slowly let it slip to the department. Soon, most of the school unofficially knew. I then one day just went to the office and said I needed the fill out a resignation form. Stayed very business about it. Wrote a nice resignation letter (do this, even if you hated it! Don't burn bridges!) and that was that.
     
  6. redtop

    redtop Companion

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    Jun 1, 2013

    The OP is only teaching 25 hours bi-weekly, sounds like about a 30% position. Quitting that without another guaranteed job isn't the same as quitting a full-time position. At least it seems that way to me.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    It's not a full-time position, but it is a guaranteed position that will produce both experience and resume fodder. Furthermore, I would think that any teacher who could turn around a tough class would be in a good position when it comes time to apply for full-time jobs down the road.
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jun 1, 2013

    Are you planning on sticking to teaching? It sounds like the major problem you had was with the attitudes of kids. I hate to have to say this, but I've been to a lot of schools with different socioeconomic statuses, and kids are kids. They're pretty much the same everywhere, yes, even with the extremely poor students and the ones from very wealthy areas. There are small differences, but you get the same types of attitudes everywhere.

    If you're planning on sticking to teaching, I would say to stick it out. It only gets easier with time, and now that you've taught for a while at this school, you're familiar with a lot of its procedures, students, and quirks. Adjusting to a new school or a new grade is incredibly hard.

    If you're having trouble with other teachers and the administrators, then that might be a good reason to move schools, but as I said, kids are similar everywhere.
     
  9. jojothesub

    jojothesub Rookie

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    Jun 1, 2013

    Caesar,

    It was indeed a typo. I meant to say very reluctant. Thank you for noticing it.

    The thing about that job, is that I work only five days every 2 weeks (5 hours per day), and I still sub on the days I am free. I am actually searching for a full-time position. If it does not work out, I will be glad to go back to subbing.

    Also, I get paid $120/day at that school versus $100/day for subbing. Does not make too much of a difference, when I take into account the amount of time it takes me to prepare these lessons.
     
  10. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jun 1, 2013

    It sounds like this school and the position is something you could do without. The pay is not all that great, it doesn't sound like the amount of work you do is paid for. If you don't mind subbing, and don't like this school, then it's ok. Having 5 days tied up every 2 weeks may actually be an inconvenience. You might have to turn down a LTS assignment because of that.
     
  11. jojothesub

    jojothesub Rookie

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    Jun 1, 2013

    Linguist,

    You are exactly right, I have lost so many sub assignments, because of that job. I would have made more money this year, subbing only.
    Anyways, I look at it in a positive way, at least, I have an 8 months teaching experience, at a tough school...
    I would feel so sorry, whenever a school called me for a sub assignment and I could not work for them.
     
  12. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Jun 2, 2013

    jojothesub, if you're really that miserable, quit. $20 more a day isn't worth it.
     

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