How do you "punish"/give consequences for not doing work?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Jerseygirlteach, Feb 13, 2015.

  1. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Feb 13, 2015

    I have some kids who lack maturity and when they get frustrated or annoyed at something, they put their heads down and don't work. I have others that just choose, at times, not to work. What do you do when calling home and/or sending the work home does nothing and keeping them in for recess to do it is apparently a treat? :confused::confused:
     
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  3. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

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    Feb 13, 2015

    "Punishment" and "Discipline" are two different things. I prefer discipline, natural, and logical consequences.

    Remember that just b/c the kid isn't 'hurting' (not crying, doesn't seem affected), doesn't mean it isn't working.

    What do they do when they stay in for recess? I would have them do their work at that time.

    Another tactic is to reward those who ARE doing the right thing... special treat (sticker, extra SSR time, whatever).
     
  4. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

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    Feb 13, 2015

    With my high schoolers, I mainly use positive reinforcement. I reward good behavior and I reward the whole class if everyone does the right thing. They get to pick their own seats if there are no missing assignments, small things like that.
     
  5. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Yes, I only have them do incomplete work at this time. That is the only reason I have for keeping them in. The problem is that they enjoy staying in with me and it becomes a motivation for them NOT to work. It becomes "If I don't do my work now, I get to hang out with Ms. Jersey and do it later in a room all to myself."

    Thank you for the feedback. However, I have tried positive reinforcement only. It has never worked for me. Kids quickly start to think that they deserve a reward every time they do the right thing. I'll give two examples. I use class dojo and give rewards for doing homework and making good choices some of the time. So, frequently through the day, I have kids coming up to me and saying "I helped Johnny pick up his pencils; can I have a class dojo point?" OR "I was sitting quietly and doing my work; can I have a class dojo point?" Another example: We had a science fair and I made participation optional because so many of my kids have limited parental support at home. I rewarded those that participated with a pizza party. I just told them about another at-home simple project and they all wanted to know what reward they would get for doing it. I told them that it was required and their reward would be a good grade. This annoyed some of them. They had been conditioned to expect a reward.

    I don't want them to start thinking every time they do their work, they get a prize.
     
  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    It depends. Usually, I will have them miss out on a fun learning game in the classroom. I let them know they have to get ___ work done and done well, if they wish to play in the game. This works as they hate watching their classmates play a fun math game or other activity while they have to sit at their desk and not participate.

    For students who really, really won't do anything (it has been a few years since this has happened..but, I can remember students like this), I do the following. "I see you won't do your work. I am not going to let the ____ assignment go to waste. I am going to do it and you can stand here and watch me have all the fun." Then, I put on a great acting job and really act like I am having a fun time doing the assignment. This has always worked. Within 5 to 10 minutes, they are begging me to be able to do the assignment. Problem solved.
     
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    With my high schoolers I do different things depending on the student or the situation. Some of them just need some encouragement, for example one student was clearly frustrated about something (he also told me), he was sad, irritated and his mind was somewhere else. I encouraged him to do the work several times, reminded him that's it wasn't even a lot, just get it done so his grade won't go down. He ended up doing most of it.

    A couple never do any or do very little and some time to time just want to put their head down and don't do any work. I remind / encourage everyone at least once, (often just saying it to the class, not calling out anyone, and not even walking around dealing with each and every one of them), but usually I also tell them that this assignment is due today, and if they're sitting here, having the opportunity to do it and chose not to, there's no chance of making it up later.

    Usually if their grades goes down too low, they get a wake up call, if they let it go that far.
    I also tell them that it's their choice to not work, but they cannot be disruptive, just because now they have nothing to do.

    I also have one on one conversations with some of them after a while.

    I don't do any positive reinforcement for this, doing their work is simply something that's expected of them, and I won't reward them for that, because then I'll be expected to reward students for every little thing.
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    As the teacher next door to me puts it, "every student has a constitutional right to fail if they really put their mind to it".

    You can try a million things with certain students and they will just not want to do anything. It's best not to beat yourself up over it. I personally don't believe in additional consequences or punishment over not doing classwork/homework. I believe them failing is consequence enough. I save consequences for behavior issues.

    I will do my best to contact parents and let them know if they are failing well ahead of time, or if I am concerned about their lack of work ethic, but sometimes their parents don't care, the student doesn't care, and I'm the only one left caring.

    So I will give words of encouragement, try to make class fun and a place they want to be a part of, but that's all I can really do, with 180 other students to take care of.

    I also try my best to build special relationships with students who work hard to achieve what they do, so those who are currently not working hard and want a special relationship with me will work at doing better.
     
  9. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    For the frustrated/annoyed kids... it may not be something that needs punished or disciplined so much as a learning moment. I was one of those kids that didn't really work in class and got frustrated easily when something was really difficult for me (still do that sometimes lol) and if I'd been punished because I wasn't working it wouldn't have made any difference. Do you know what is causing these students to get frustrated or annoyed? Is it work related frustration (i.e., something doesn't completely make sense, they think the work is too difficult, etc.) or unrelated to what they're doing?

    As for just flat out not working... do they get homework done or are they literally getting NOTHING completed? Could they do homework at recess maybe somewhere so it's not a reward? Maybe not with you? Not to make another teacher a "punishment" but just take away the part they enjoy that makes it seem less desirable. Student teaching last year some of the other teachers had kids do their homework on the wall outside (which is actually sneaky, because then they have to watch the other kids play while they sit and work...)

    And as previously mentioned... sometimes no matter what, some kids just won't do work when you want them to (I was definitely that child... I used all my work time in class to doodle and daydream) which is frustrating, but eventually they will feel the consequences of their wasted time.
     
  10. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Feb 13, 2015

    Food when they finish an assignment.

    That's really the only universal reward I've found works with just about every kid.

    One day I brought in a big box of goldfish crackers and whenever a kid finished a paper they got a small dixie cup of crackers. Kids who seldom completed anything started working their tails off.

    Worked great until I ran out of crackers.
     
  11. TXTeacherW

    TXTeacherW Rookie

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    Feb 14, 2015

    If you ask for a Dojo point, you might lose a Dojo point. :) Guess I'm mean sometimes, but I find I have to squash some types of questioning. I tell them not to ask for privileges, because it makes me want to say no. Privileges are earned, not given.

    Going back to to original question, though, I'm all for natural consequences to an extent. I give choices, "You can choose not to do this now, but you'll have to do it during recess." We have workroom at recess. Or maybe they miss a fun activity associated with the work they weren't doing. "It's okay for now that you aren't doing this work, but you'll have to sit in the hallway and sulk while the rest of us work hard. And you will have to complete this during Study Hall."
     
  12. Mamacita

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    I guess I don't understand, or maybe it's because I have only taught older students, but if discipline is consistent, punishment is rarely necessary. Make sure students who do what they're supposed to do receive privileges, benefits, and tangible rewards which are distributed/awarded in front of everyone, ignore those who don't do what they're supposed to do, and in a surprisingly short time, more and more students will be doing what they're supposed to do. The diehard do-nothings punish themselves for their lack of discipline. No reward for you? Not my problem. Just please be sure a child is not lethargic because of hunger.
     
  13. TamaraF

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    Feb 14, 2015

    I teach high school. The consequences are pretty clear...if you don't do the work, you don't get the mark. You don't get the marks, you don't pass the class. Guess what? I'll still be here, next term! I do call home, talk to my admin team, and talk to each student, but by the time they reach grade 10, I believe it's time to learn a life lesson. I tell them, if I don't do my job, I don't get paid. Your job is to do the assignments. Your pay is the grades you earn.
    I do not allow sleeping in my classroom, or electronics. If a student chooses to sit and do nothing, I will talk to them about it. If they are disrupting others, they must leave. I do not bribe, beg or plead.
     
  14. 2ndTimeAround

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    I totally agree.

    With one exception, this semester I have allowed students to sleep in my class. They can sit there and do nothing, which always leads to major disruptions for those who actually want to learn, or they can put their head down and sleep while others get to learn. This semester my #1 priority are those students who want to do well. I have a class where about 1/2 of the students are frequent flyers to the discipline office. Their goals are to disrupt class and take everyone down with them. So it has pretty much come down to spending my time managing their behavior or teaching my class. I'll tell everyone at the start of class to get out their notes for lecture (or whatever) and that's their warning. They sleep, I don't interrupt and they get yet another referral written. At this point it is up to the administration to decide on what is best. Most of them will be in jail before the semester is over anyhow (two already are).
     
  15. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    This is how I feel as well. I teach 8th grade so maybe I should be more into rewards and consequences, but I'm not. My AP told me to tell kids they have to finish assignments during lunch as a punishment. I said my work is not punishment. It is an opportunity to learn. I will never use work as punishment. I don't give busy work. We do fun assignments and if a kid won't do it, that kid gets a zero. That's it.
     
  16. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    We have homework intervention for an hour after school. If they don't want to do the work, they get a homework intervention. If they skip HWI, they get a Saturday school. Skip that and it doubles to two or an ISS. I've only seen it get that far once or twice. Kids hate HWI because they miss practice, hanging with friends, etc... Of course, the whole district has to be on board.

    What do the kids enjoy? Could you take something away? Or not let them participate in a fun activity until all work is done? I don't allow my students to earn any extra credit if they have missing work.
     
  17. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    If reward or discipline os not working, there is a deeper problem. Document and meet with colleagues, parents, admin, anyone who will help sort out the problem.

    I use class dojo.
    I also reward with the smallest things...one skittle, a sticker on their cheek, a cotton ball, lunch in the room, a word search, etc.

    This week I had a little Valentine craft they could color and turn into a box.

    If it's one consistent child, could that child have a mentor to report to? Maybe report first thing in the morning for motivational talk and a document sheet. You would document throughout the day. The child reports with the sheet to mentor at the end of the day. They discuss what went well and not so well.

    A 4th grade colleague uses simple, tiny connect the dot sheets. They are on the kiddos desks and only SHE can connect the dots. She will for behavior, names on papers, homework, etc. When it's filled, the kids color it and display it. That is reward in it's self. Yes, 4th grade!
     
  18. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    I tell my students that I can't make them do their work but I can make them not have any fun... Students who have "finish-first" assignments are not invited to any extra free time activities, they may have to put in 10-15 minutes of work before going to PE (the PE teacher is okay with this), they may miss recess in the morning (I try not to take away all of their afternoon recess), etc. Sometimes I pass out hardworking treats (right now the favorite treat is roasted chick peas). Depending on the student, I may photocopy it and send it home for homework. My
     
  19. otterpop

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    I do understand this point of view, and this is how I usually treat incomplete work that students just choose not to do. My worry about this, though, is that some of these students just don't care enough about poor grades to let it be a motivator. Their parents see the grades and give them a stern talk about needing to take school seriously, but there's no follow through, and they'll just slide through school with D's because they can. Most of my students really care about their grades, but those who don't need... something else, or just to be let continue as is until they get a wakeup call in 10 years? I don't know what the right answer is.

    In my ideal world, the parents of these kids would sit them down at a table and not let them go anywhere until the work's done. I have some students with parents who will do that, and incomplete work is a short lived problem for them.
     
  20. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    For groups where I have students like this, I build a fun activity into the end of every group. It's always related to the content so it's not a total waste of instructional time, but it's still a game. For example, if I taught a new phonics pattern that day I'll let them play sparkle at the end with words using that pattern, or I'll let them play a relay game with math facts, etc. Students who are following the rules (including working) are allowed to play. Students who have chosen to goof around during the lesson then have to spend our game time completing their work. If a kid is truly working hard the entire time and is just slow, of course I still let them play. But if they're refusing or goofing around, they don't get to. I've found it to be really effective. My teammate does something similar with her older students (4-6th), but she lets them earn free minutes on their i pads if they're doing everything they're supposed to. We're not allowed to take away recess unless a kid is in the office for severe behavior (refusing to work doesn't count), so we had to come up with our own systems.
     
  21. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Feb 23, 2015

    This is something that should be the responsibility of your admin. More effective practices I have seen are where admin set up a weekend or lunch homework club where students who are getting a D or below are required to attend. The teachers who run these get paid extra. The benefits are two-fold. One, the students want to avoid going, and two, if they do go, they're forced to get their work done. (it's easier to enforce getting work done in environments like these) Usually these are highly unenjoyable affairs where you shouldn't talk or joke around with the students or else it becomes "hang out with mr. ____ time". It should be silent.

    Alternatively, if you feel you have the time, you can try to do it yourself during your lunch time. I've tried to do this, but getting all of the students in, marking who showed up and who didn't, monitoring to see that they're getting their work done, all during a time where I can't eat my lunch or get my work done, didn't work for me.
     
  22. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    Feb 23, 2015

    F.

    And they and their parents don't care about that, either.


    :tired:
     

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