How do you model a lesson?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by nstructor, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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    Jan 13, 2017

    Do the students sit there and watch or do they write down what you're doing?
     
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  3. shoreline02

    shoreline02 Cohort

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    Jan 13, 2017

    I teach 4th grade science and if I am modeling an experiment or centers, I will explicitly show them what I want them to do and they will watch. I will fully explain EVERY step, including behavioral expectations, then they can ask questions. * In the begining I will even show them how to walk from one center to the next, push their chair in when finished, put materials away, etc. Those little things matter. *
     
  4. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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    Jan 14, 2017

    Do you question them about what you've done after you model? Are they taking notes as you're modeling?
     
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  5. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Jan 15, 2017

    I've learned that pithy is always preferable. Elementary students, I probably would not require note taking in most circumstances, because at this level it can be a distraction; on the other hand, if note taking is one of the objectives, which sometimes begins in 4th grade, then yes, I'd have lessons where I'd weigh the emphasis in the lesson, focusing more on proper note taking. I try to leave much room for exploration and discovery. I do agree with shoeline02 that covering certain details can make the lesson run more smoothly, especially in discovery lessons. If certain aspects of procedures or understanding are already set, then students don't lose time focusing on those covered procedures and can focus on what needs to be explored.
     
  6. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jan 17, 2017

    If you're referring to direct instruction, I use Lucy Calkins' workshop model for all academic areas. "Today I'm going to teach you...."...."Watch me as I....". And then make sure there is an active engagement part where they can participate in some of that work together before trying it independently.
     
  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jan 17, 2017

    I love using the "I do, we do, you do" method of modeling writing. I'll show them examples of what I would like them to do, then have the group brainstorm on a similar task (perhaps the same genre of writing but with a slightly different topic). That way, they have modeled and practiced the work before trying it on their own.
     
  8. Bioguru

    Bioguru Companion

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    Jan 17, 2017

    I really changed how I do this after we spent a year of inservice on The Fundamental Five. I forget the exact name of this strategy, but it is essentially frequent, small group breaks during a lesson. A typical day in my chemistry class is as follows:

    1. Warmup, which takes about 5 minutes as I put in roll, pass out papers, etc.

    2. Lecture for about 10 minutes on the topic; today was The Ideal Gas Law. I defined ideal gas vs real gas, gave the equation, discussed appropriate units for each variable, discussed the ideal gas constant and worked out a basic problem.

    3. I then gave them 5 minutes to work out 3 problems with their table partner.

    4. We discussed the 3 problems, answered questions, etc., which took another 5 minutes.

    5. I then showed them three difficult problem types with the ideal gas law which took about 5-10 minutes.

    6. I then gave them 3 more problems of the more difficult variety to solve with their table partner.

    7. We concluded class by discussing these three problems.

    I really love this method as it keeps the students engaged, gives me a little break, and the students really do seem to retain it better. The idea is that students (well, all of us) remember the beginning and end of a lesson better than the middle. By making a lot of mini-beginnings and -endings students forget less.
     
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  9. shoreline02

    shoreline02 Cohort

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    Jan 17, 2017

    The whole process is sort of like one big discussion. I'm asking questions, they're asking questions, we're all talking. No, no notes. I might do an exit ticket though, get a general idea of what they understood or need help with. Notes aren't a big thing in my 4th grade science class. But we do use interactive notebooks almost daily. In there I have interactive pages with "notes" or information they will need. When its all in once place, its easy for them to refer back to.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2017

    This. I use this model in reading, writing and math.
     
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  11. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jan 20, 2017

    Yep! Same here. I have learned so much from Lucy Calkins since using her model for the past couple of years. Simple but life changing.
     
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  12. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

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    Jan 22, 2017

    I'm secondary, but I've worked with elementary and middle school students in different settings outside of school teaching. But, I'm big on group activities and student-centered learning thus I've always modeled group roles and expectations to the students. I also would supply the elementary students with a checklist of duties/expectations.
    :)
     
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  13. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jan 22, 2017

    This is great, thanks. :) I searched a bit and found this (below). I think it could really be used for any lesson, it's a good structure. The one thing I'm not clear on is the "link". Do you use this, and could you give an example?

    [​IMG]
     
  14. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jan 22, 2017

    I also try to use this. I do with grammar, but it's a bit harder when reading a longer story.

    OP, my method of modeling depends on what we're learning. Sometimes they are taking notes and sometimes not.
     
  15. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jan 22, 2017

    Yep! I sure do. You're basically reiterating the teaching point, but reminding them to connect to all their work, not just the specific content. For example, good readers do XYZ all the time. You're basically reminded them what they learned and why it's important.
     

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