How do you know if/when a student is being truthful about an illness or disability?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by hbcaligirl1985, May 18, 2012.

  1. hbcaligirl1985

    hbcaligirl1985 Cohort

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    May 18, 2012

    I imagine this is a touchy subject and a tough situation to be in. When I was student teaching I was provided with all IEPs and backgrounds on my student that might require additional help and guidance.

    No such information is usually giving when you're subbing.

    I've had instances where a student really DID need to leave the classroom for a moment or go into a quiet area to calm down because they had Autism or emotional issues that have been documented by the school.

    And the I've had kids who have quite convincingly faked it to get laughs or to cause trouble.

    In this situation I almost feel like using my best judgement is still stacked against me. If I'm not sure and the student DOES have a disability and I deny him--I'm a bitch--if they don't and I fall for it--I'm an idiot.

    I am hesitant to asking other students too due to them A) wanting to help their friends joke around or B) Not knowing.

    In situations like this--what should I do if I'm not sure? Is it one of those things where I'm just going to have to trust the student is telling the truth?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 18, 2012

    I think that you have to assume that the student is telling the truth. If you deny a student access to essential, federally mandated services for any reason, you and the school could get into a lot of trouble.

    Always leave the teacher a note explaining what the student said/did and where they went. You can also call down to that place (nurse, office, wherever) and confirm that the student made it down there.
     
  4. hbcaligirl1985

    hbcaligirl1985 Cohort

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    May 18, 2012

    Thanks Caesar :)
     
  5. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    May 18, 2012

    At my school, the office staff knows all kids with IEPs, so you could make a quick call. I came upon a sub yelling at one of my students who couldn't focus. My student was actively telling him that he had an IEP, but the sub didn't care or didn't believe him. A quick phone call to the office would have confirmed the student's claim.
     
  6. hbcaligirl1985

    hbcaligirl1985 Cohort

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    May 19, 2012

    Yikes, that's awful Special-t :(
     
  7. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    May 21, 2012

    If you're just there for a day or two, you don't really need to know the ins and outs of the IEPs. There are privacy issues surrounding what you are and are not entitled to know as a sub. If there is something that truly needs to be done, the teacher will likely leave instructions in the lesson plan. Barring that, you could always ask the other grade level teachers if there is anyone in the classroom you need to be aware of. The team generally knows what is going on with each other and they'll tell you who may make your day difficult.
     
  8. Nitch

    Nitch Rookie

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    May 21, 2012

    I usually just write a nurse pass then give the nurse a call if they don't show back up with the pass signed by the nurse. You aren't going to be told witch kids are on IEPs or health plans. Or if mt gut says to call I call.
     

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