how do you handle students who flip out??!!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by merigold78, Mar 14, 2007.

  1. merigold78

    merigold78 Cohort

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    Mar 14, 2007

    so my (teacher) friend and i were having a discussion today as to how we handle kids who "flip out." by flip out i mean basically go into a temper tantrum, say "NO!"/refuse to do anything you ask them to, etc. i told her that i try to ignore as much as the beh. as i can, as i believe much of it is done for attention. HOWEVER, i have definitely had situations in the past where i've had to intervene (after a child picked up a chair and threw it, for example), and often will send these kids to someone else's room or the principal's office. my friend said she basically does the same, but will often send them straight to the office. so i guess my question is, how do you handle these "difficult" children?? i can't believe i've taught for 4 years and still do not feel like i have the 'right' answer to this-aagh!! please let me know...thanks!! -meri
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Mar 14, 2007

    What grade are they? MY HS kids would go right to the dean's office, but I imagine that even in elementary, the age would matter.
     
  4. Lesley

    Lesley Habitué

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    I have 4 boys in my K room who have temper tantrums. Everything depends on the degree of their tantrum. If it is a mild tantrum I give them a time out away from the class to pull themselves together and they are able to join the class when they believe they are able to cooperate. Stomping tantrums and yelling get time out and a call home. I have the child talk to their parent as long as necessary. I have requested a few times that the parent comes to school and either sits with the child or takes the child home. In severe tantrums, throwing chairs kicking furniture, slamming doors etc...they go straight to the principal and I also call home for the parent to come to school asap. I get very tired of these kids interfering and stopping the other kids from learning. Lately I just do not tolerate it and the rest of the class appreciates it. Parents have been very cooperative.
     
  5. firecallie

    firecallie Rookie

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    I've gone through this alot with a newer student. Consistancy is my main thing. I stay really calm and say you can choose to follow directions or you can go to the office. I then tell them I will give them 5 seconds to decide. After five seconds I call the office and they come down and get her and she typically gets taken out kicking and screaming. I praise her when she gets through half a day with no tantrums and a whole day gets her a special job in the room. Eventually it will go to a week of good behavior but for now a day would be good. She is slowly realizing that her tantrums don't affect me, and I always do the same thing. On the positive side it shows the class that I mean what I say and that they don't want the office staff coming to the room because of them.
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I don't know your age so this is for younger students.

    Strict, consistency, and immediate.....

    Use your body language/tone of voice, tell them it is NOT acceptable and have a consequence every time. ALthough you want to be consistent in your response, point out logical consequences whenever possible.

    THEN....When you see them do something the least bit good start praising the heck out of them and keep doing that.

    Use key phrases. In other words, use the same short phrase every time you catch them with that type of activity. This helps to teach them to identify what they are doing.

    Watch for patterns. What is triggering the student? Excercise preventive maintence.

    When you see the student start to look like he is about to mess up, start praising and telling what you like. This tends to calm my students back down. It's not always possible to catch it in time of course.

    You can additionally have a behavior/reward system.

    Make a REALLY big deal if the student makes it through a determined time period (all day or all week..depends on your student).

    Continue to have teachable moments.

    Ask for outside help when you need it. You do have other students to take care of.
     
  7. kburen

    kburen Cohort

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    Mar 15, 2007

    When my 5th graders want to tell me "no" I let them tell the principal "no" or why they want to tell me "no". Meaning, I send them directly to the office. If they refuse to go, I call the principal and she comes up to handle it. To ignore it and let it continue, or let them get away with it disrupts my class and the kids who WANT to learn and care about passing their state tests in May. I refuse to let one child who doesn't care get in the way of the rest who do care.
     
  8. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    I had a child once (5th grade) who had quite the temper. She would get very angry and argumentative with me, but usually did it during transition times. If she became very biligerant I said, "I'll be happy to listen when your voice sounds more like mine." in the gentlest manner you can imagined. She usually toned it down enough that I let her state her position. If the conversation started going in circles I would say, "Last word" meaning she could say one last sentence. My word was final though, and she knew it.

    What grade are you teaching?
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I have used similar strategies to runsw/scissors with good success. This year, I have a couple of grade 8 boys who can get very beligerent and argumentative. I use different strategies with each of them. One needs to be able to remove himself from the situation and so he has a hall pass that says something like--" Permission to walk, Cooling down, can't talk". He has permission (cleared through the office) to spend about 5 minutes going for a walk through the hall to cool down; it has been very successful with him. The other just needs to be ignored--I tell him that I'm not going to argue with him and then leave him alone until he is ready to discuss things in a calm manner.
     
  10. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    I really like the "permission to walk pass"
    I have 1st graders so I'm thinking that will not work!:p
     
  11. merigold78

    merigold78 Cohort

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    Mar 16, 2007

    i teach 1st and my g-friend teaches kinder. the interesting thing is, we have both taught in VERY challenging schools...and yet we still struggle with this whole temper tantrum thing!! oh well, thank you to everyone for all of your tips + advice. i plan to print them off for future reference...have a great weekend!! -meri
     
  12. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Mar 17, 2007

    Sometimes it is good to just ignore the child and move the rest of the class away to an interesting activity. The child will quit the tantrum when he sees he is getting no attention and everyone else is having fun.

    I have one student I am trying to teach how to calm himself down. He has a special chair he may go to when he is feeling crowded or feeling there is too much noise, etc. Normally I have to tell him, "It's time for you to go to the green chair and calm yourself down. When you are calm come back to the group." Sometimes he stays in the chair after he is calm, but joins in with group activities. He has yet to go to the chair for himself.
     

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