How do you give math fact tests?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by mrsdong, Nov 13, 2008.

  1. mrsdong

    mrsdong Rookie

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    Nov 13, 2008

    3 minutes for 30 questions? 5 minutes for 40 questions? Different people give different answers. Just wonering what majority of teachers are doing.
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 14, 2008

    A 'Mad Minute' page has 30 problems on a page- in the beginning. As you progress through the mad minute program there are more on a page. After MONTHS of drilling, reviewing, playing games to reinforce addition and subtraction math facts to 18, I give a 5 minute drill, 100 problems.
     
  4. ranchan1_2

    ranchan1_2 Rookie

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    Nov 14, 2008

    I originally started off at 3 minutes for 30 math facts (addition/subtraction)

    Then I see how they are doing within the week. If most of them are getting done in less time than 3 minutes, then I chop off some time (usually 10 seconds each time).

    We're down to about 1 minutes and 50 seconds for addition. In subtraction, we're down to 2 minutes and 40 seconds.

    So i can see where we need to work on.
     
  5. lindita323

    lindita323 Companion

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    Nov 14, 2008

    Per distict guidelines, we have to give 2 timed tests per week and we report the results twice per quarter. They tell us by grade level what timed tests are required. For example, right now my 4th graders are doing 30 problems consisting of dividing 0 by a number, dividing by 1, dividing a number by itself, and dividing by 10. In order to pass, the students have to complete a 30 problem sheet with no errors in one minute. We also have a bit of leeway with increasing the time to one minute and a half.
     
  6. daizie75

    daizie75 Rookie

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    Nov 14, 2008

    We give short quizzes I think about 15 questions but I'm not sure I don't have one here. We set the timer to count up and students try to beat their timed score and get them all right. That way they are competing against themselves and there is not a TIMES UP. There are always kids who freak out about timed tests.
     
  7. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Nov 14, 2008

    What grade? I gave them 3 minutes for 100 problems. That was in 4th and 5th grades.
     
  8. TennisPlayer

    TennisPlayer Cohort

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    Nov 14, 2008

    The goal at my school is 5 minutes for 100 problems for 3rd Grade.
     
  9. Irishmom2009

    Irishmom2009 New Member

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    Nov 15, 2008

    My kids love working on math facts because we use Math Magician. Just do a Google search for Oswego Math Magician. The kids can work on it in our computer lab and during math seatwork time I have it on my 2 computers in my class. The kids pick their level. ie. addition +5 and the computer will give them a 1 minute test of all the +5 facts. It has addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts. The kids can see a timer as they do the problems, and if they pass with 100% or 95% they can print out a certificate. In my room if they pass in the computer lab, and show me their certificate, I will give them credit for the pass.
     
  10. 2ndTimeArnd

    2ndTimeArnd Companion

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    Nov 15, 2008

    I just did my first timed math facts with 1st graders and gave them 10 minutes for 100 problems, all +1 facts. Looks like 3 out of 25 passed (with 90 percent accuracy), and these are the middle-level kids; more of the higher-level students are able to do it. I was surprised 1st graders could even tackle a page of 100 problems, but my teammate, a veteran of 1st (I'm new to it this year) swears they can do it.
     
  11. Luv2Learn

    Luv2Learn Companion

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    Nov 15, 2008

    Was this the first time they were having to do 100 problems? They could have been a little overwhelmed all at once. Not to say that they can't do it eventually, but I would think it would probably be a better idea to cut down on the amount and build up.
     
  12. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Nov 15, 2008

    I have a very unusual way of doing time tests (in 3rd/4th not 1st.) I don't have them try to beat a set time for each test. Rather, I have a stop watch going and when they are done they come up to me and I flash them the time. they write it on the back of the paper and chart it, aiming to get better each time. I do tests that increase in difficulty so one week it's 1's, then 2's, then 1's and 2's, then 5's, then 2's and 5's and so forth. By the end, they have learned all their facts, and most can do 50 problems in less than 2:30. Many can do 50 problems in less than 2 minutes.

    I've talked a lot about this before so if you looked for old posts I may have explained it better since I was doing it at the time.
     

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