How do you get a substitute teaching job?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by sidhewing, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. sidhewing

    sidhewing Rookie

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    Feb 8, 2011

    Hey Everyone!

    I'm trying to find out what I have to do in order to a get a substitute teaching job.

    I've been told that I can either call schools or drive to each school and ask for substitute teaching application, but can anyone tell me how it works, so I don't look like I don't know what I'm doing?

    I live in NY if that helps. I have a BA in Secondary Ed English, and I'm currently getting my Masters Degree is Adolescent Literacy Ed. Any advice on what the process is for obtaining a substitute teaching position would be a lot of help! Thanks.
     
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  3. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    Feb 8, 2011

    The process really depends on each individual district. I live in Central New York and when I got on sub lists I basically applied and waited. Both the districts I subbed in had substitute interviews days at certain points and held the applications that met their qualifications in order they were received and called when they had an interview slot available. There may still be some districts that really need substitutes (usually districts that are more rural) and you may be able to get on their lists sooner. Calling the districts and seeing if they're accepting new substitutes would probably be a great way to start and find out the process for each district. Good luck!
     
  4. Vince

    Vince Rookie

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    Feb 8, 2011

    In my state (CA) there is a website called edjoin that all schools use to advertise employment openings. When the district I wanted advertised for subs, I applied.

    If I were you, I would call the district office of where you would like to sub and ask for personnel and ask them their procedures. You may also be able to find out on the district's website.
     
  5. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Feb 8, 2011

    I'm in CA too & like Vince said, we have a certain site to go to (Ed-Join) for all kinds of school district positions to apply online. In my area, hardly, if anyone takes walk-in applications anymore. That's obsolete. Call the districts you'd like to sub for & ask how you'd apply to be a substtute teacher & what documents you'll need. It's usually:

    - transcripts
    - TB test
    - verification of exam(s) passing
    - resume
    - maybe CPR verification (fee to do this too)
    - fingerprinting fee & go to a location maybe other than the district office to get fingerprinted
     
  6. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    Mar 12, 2011

    What part of NY are you in?
     
  7. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Mar 12, 2011

    In my area you just need to have your four year degree. The school districts have been hiring subs all year.

    I think you get certified to sub for two years at a time here (but you, having teaching credentials probably don't have to do that -- this is MN).

    Other than that, and the background check, it's just like any other job. Apply, interview, get hired. Though not nearly as much work/effort as getting a full time teaching job. ;)

    (I think you can only long-term sub here if you are certified in that subject, not sure.)
     
  8. Subber

    Subber Companion

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    Mar 27, 2011

    Some school shave a sub position advertised but usually it's at the district office that you apply. As a sub hired by the district, you are eligible to take work assignment at all the schools in the district
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mar 27, 2011

    Call the administrative/board office of all the districts in which you are interested in subbing...they will let you know the procedures...as said, it can vary state to state, district to district.
     
  10. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Mar 27, 2011

    I'm a high school student and my sister is grown.. and she did go to college and graduated. She said she was going to become a substitute teacher before she went to college but she would have needed 30 college credits to be considered. Therefor she did not apply and she doesn't even need the job with her degree anyway.
     
  11. Carliee

    Carliee Rookie

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    Apr 15, 2011

    I'm in MN and if you have a bachelor's degree, you can be what is called a short call sub. There's a set number of days you can sub for the same teacher without taking a day off. Some districts have allowances increasing the number of days for their district.

    In order to be a long call sub in MN, you need a teaching degree in the subject area/grade level of the assignment. Districts need to get special permission to use short call subs. In order to get the short call license, you need to have one of these districts sign for you.

    The rules will vary by state and school district. Private schools aren't required by the State (in MN) to hire licensed teachers for anything, but many have self-imposed guidelines that they won't hire unlicensed teachers. Some extend this to subs as well as full-time teachers.

    Minneapolis, MN, hires a small number of subs who get benefits. They aren't allowed to pick up assignments until 5:30 a.m. and tend to get the jobs no one else wants. They also need to be available every day, but I've heard they get paid if they aren't needed.

    Getting hired to sub in Mpls is easy...surviving and thriving as a sub in Mpls, not so easy. You really have to enjoy the urban environment or you'll be miserable. Personally, I'll take urban attitude over snotty attitude any day. They usually stop hiring subs at some point in the school year.

    That's MN subbing qualifications in a nutshell.



     
  12. Ms. Scarlet

    Ms. Scarlet Rookie

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    May 14, 2011

    *cross-posted from How to get a subbing job...help*

    Most times, if you go to a school district's website, there are instructions for applying to be a sub. It's usually nothing too crazy.

    But one thing I definitely recommend is if you submit your application and don't hear back after a week or two is follow up. Follow up, follow up, follow up. Honestly, MOST of the times that I applied to sub I just wouldn't hear back for weeks and think "I guess no one is hiring." But I needed to make some money so I figured it couldn't hurt to call and check. So I would just call and say, "Hello this is Ms. Scarlet; I'm just calling to inquire about the status of my application for a subbing position." Every single time they have said, "Oh yes, you're good to go. Just come in and fill out your I-9." So that's my best tip.
     
  13. jcar03

    jcar03 Companion

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    Jun 10, 2011

    I really depends on where you live. I had to fill out paperwork and have a physical done. I had to have a TB test done which I had to do in college once a year to go out into clinicals. My test came back positive. I knew I didn't have TB but I had to have a chest x-ray done to be marked clear. I wish I had known that I needed a physical when I was still student teaching and had health insurance beause it would of covered most of my $230 bill. I finally got everything in order and started subbing at the beginning of March. I worked pretty regular between my local school district and the special ed co-op. I had to have all my paper work filled out with the Regional Office of Education and my name was put on whatever school district I check in my paperwork. I than contacted each school directly and the one I never got a chance to contact never called me.
     
  14. The Maestro

    The Maestro Rookie

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    Jun 29, 2011

    I subbed in two districts before I became a teacher and had two different hiring experiences. The first was done the correct way, the second was born of desperation (and has always provided me a chuckle when I recall it!)

    The first one was a fairly well-off district, and I had to turn in an application, get fingerprinted, show proof of medical clearance, college transcripts, CBEST results, and then I was interviewed by two people on the school board.

    A couple years later, when I wasn't getting quite as many jobs in that district as I liked, I applied at the neighboring district, which was a bit poorer. I filled out the application, then the DO secretary told me they'd get in touch and let me know what papers I would need to bring in sometime next week-ish.

    The next morning (it was a Friday, and this was before districts had the automated systems, the secretaries called you up and asked what assignments you'd be willing to do) that secretary called me around five-ish and asked me if I'd like to work today. I sleepily responded that I hadn't been interviewed yet and didn't have the papers. Her response: "We have ninety teachers who called in today, please come in!" So the hiring process for me for this district was to enter the District Office where my interview process was as follows: "Want the job?" "Yes," "You're hired!", signed a couple papers, got handed a map of the district with the secretary saying "Go to this school, good luck!" and off I went :lol:
     
  15. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Jun 30, 2011

    Register with a school district, and then go drop of flyers and introduce yourself to the person in charge of booking subs at individual schools.
     

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