How do you feel about prizes or prize boxes?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by otterpop, Jun 26, 2014.

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Do you use a tangible reward system?

  1. Yes, a classroom system

    11 vote(s)
    35.5%
  2. Yes, a school-wide system

    3 vote(s)
    9.7%
  3. Yes, both classroom and school-wide

    7 vote(s)
    22.6%
  4. Only for specific students

    3 vote(s)
    9.7%
  5. No

    7 vote(s)
    22.6%
  6. None of these answers fit (please explain)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. TnKinder

    TnKinder Companion

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    Jun 27, 2014

    I have no problem with rewarding student. I have a treat box full of pencils, fun erasers, bracelets and matchbox cars. We are a PBIS school, so students also earn bucks that can be spent at the school store every grading period.
     
  2. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Jun 27, 2014

    I don't have a problem with prizes, but I don't use them in my classroom because I don't think the vast majority of the kids are well-behaved enough to deserve a prize. My school uses prizes/incentives/contests to promote attendance, wearing school uniform, etc.

    Every year I taught MS, we did PBIS with lots of prizes, rewards and activities. I've never seen PBIS work effectively in regards to changing the long-term behavior of the problems kids. It simply rewarded the kids who would behave even without an incentive and the borderline kids that weren't that big of a headache to begin with.
     
  3. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Jun 27, 2014

    I'm not sure how to interpret your mentioning a treasure box ????? I do use one and commented on it. Do you think a reward system is used only for a need? Something for me to think about. My using a reward system and sewing crafts to use motivate me .... I guess I like to have fun as much as the kids, but I consider it more a want then a need
     
  4. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Jun 27, 2014

    Why should we not expect to be compensated for work outside of contractual hours? If I go to a PD outside of the hours between 7:50 - 3:10; then I deserve compensation. REAL compensation - not a free lunch, a free cooler/lunchbox, a free pen, a free mini calendar etc.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jun 27, 2014

    We are a PBIS district; therefore, each site has a PBIS rewards system in place.

    As a teacher, though, I did have a classroom rewards system in full effect.
     
  6. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Jun 27, 2014

    I use incentives in my room. Honestly it's because I feel the problem student get so much attention, I like being able to recognize those who are doing good things. I teach in a PreK to 6 school and all teachers have some sort of incentive program, some more elaborate than others. I feel like in our push to increase rigor and responsibility we sometimes forget that these are kids. Of course even as an adult I love getting small rewards from time to time. If it's good enough for me, why not my kids?
     
  7. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jun 27, 2014

    I love your explanation! :thumb:
     
  8. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Jun 27, 2014

    Great way to put it.
     
  9. Mrs.DLC

    Mrs.DLC Comrade

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    Jun 27, 2014

    I use one

    Yes. I like having a prize box. Most of our teachers do use one. I don't need one for management or behavior,my classroom runs smoothly. But, as PPs have said, it can be an added incentive!! I have found it worked for me in high and low SES schools, prize choice depends on the student!! Earning or being rewarded can be a powerful thing.
     
  10. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Jun 27, 2014

    :eek: That sounds terrible. Why can't teachers give out things? I can understand the candy part, but c'mon, what kids don't love stickers? What about stamps? I had some teachers that would use rubber stamps on our papers that would have a little picture and a "Good Job" written, or they'd stamp our hands (though I'm sure some admins would frown upon that because a child may be allergic/sensitive to the ink :()
     
  11. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jun 27, 2014

    My first year I used a prize box that students could choose out of each time they improved on their IEP goals. My CT for student teaching had done this. I found that they were just as motivated by being able to keep track of their progress on a sticker chart, and that was intrinsic. I no longer do the prize box.

    We have a school wide PBIS system where all students can earn incentives, and I support this in my class. Our kids earn "tiger paws" for good behavior. I have no problem with this system at all, because it's open to everyone. I do feel torn on individual behavior plans where students can earn prizes for basically not hitting anyone or making it through a 30 minute period with no tantrums. Their general behavior can be horrible, but hey at least they managed to not be violent that day. I have a hard time watching those kids get all these extra special rewards and attention while other students behave every day and would never get extra prizes or rewards. I know someone is going to say the whole accommodations thing and it's just like some kids need glasses, etc, but severe behaviors are harder for me to wrap my head around. I always wonder what happens to those students when they get older, and how are we setting them up for success in the future? You can wear your glasses to your job, but your job is not going to let you have a break every 3 minutes or give you a bonus every time you attempt something.
     
  12. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Jun 27, 2014

    I wanted to take a look at this question from a different perspective, so I asked myself:

    How do you feel about getting a paycheck for doing things you should be doing anyway (contributing to the good of society, helping your fellow citizens, contributing to the welfare of the next generation)?


    Personally, I feel that intrinsic motivation is important, but find that getting a monetary reward is icing on the cake.
     
  13. teach1

    teach1 Companion

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    Jun 27, 2014

    Yes, I feel like you took the thoughts out of my head directly!!
     
  14. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jun 27, 2014

    I agree that getting a paycheck is why we do what we do. However, we all went to school too. Paid for it even. In college, no one gave us rewards for showing up to class; the reward was the good grade and knowing that it would lead to a (hopefully) good job in the future.
     
  15. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Jun 27, 2014

    From Michael Linsin (Smart Classroom Management):

    "Anything that whiffs of bribery should be avoided. No doubt about it. Promising a reward if your students do this or that—or don’t do this or that—creates a Pandora’s box of new problems and doesn’t change behavior in the long run.

    Simply by cutting incentives of this nature out of your program, it will not only calm and mature your students, and begin fueling their intrinsic motivation, but it will make your teaching life gloriously easier.

    This doesn’t mean, however, that you have to throw away your prize box or stop giving out pencils and stickers altogether. In fact, when presented in a certain way, they can indeed help improve behavior—albeit in an indirect but much more authentic way.

    The key is in the giving.

    Instead of doling out prizes based on what you receive in return (i.e. good behavior), you’ll hand them out for no reason at all. In other words, they become no longer an incentive in the traditional sense, but a free gift.

    “Hey, before you leave for the day, I’ve got cool pencils for everyone!”

    It’s a simple way of showing your love and appreciation for your class. Nothing more. But here’s the thing. Small gestures like this, along with the personality you bring with you to the classroom, and a few other things, will cause your class to reciprocate that love."
     

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