How do you do snack time? What time of day?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by sophie1, Aug 4, 2009.

  1. sophie1

    sophie1 Comrade

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    Aug 4, 2009

    Some teachers have a nice schedule telling parents when to bring in a snack for the class. Parents only have to bring in snack once in awhile. I loved this idea and so I tried it last year.

    The problem was that the same students brought in a snack for the class, while others didn't. The other problem, students brought in homemade cookies, brownies, etc. almost daily.

    We are supposed to be eating "healthier" and although parents know- they are trying to be nice and do something special for the class. I really liked the homemade special treats, but everyday isn't good for the kids.

    So...I'm thinking about having parents send in a daily snack with their child. I'll have have some snacks on hand for those who do not have a snack. What do you do for snack time? When do you have it?
     
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  3. smalagreca

    smalagreca Companion

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    Aug 4, 2009

    Parents send in daily snacks. All snacks MUST BE healthy. I keep a box of crackers in my room just for those who do not have anything.
     
  4. hawkteacher

    hawkteacher Comrade

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    Aug 4, 2009

    My students are responsible for bringing in their own healthy snacks. If they forget or don't bring anything that day, then they don't eat anything that day - they'll be okay.

    This year I want to send home a note about what constitutes a "healthy snack" as sometimes there is confusion about this. Whenever a student brings in an unhealthy snack, I let them have it that day, but then tell them not to bring it again.

    Does anyone have a letter/list they use to help inform what is a healthy snack/what isn't?
     
  5. 1stGr8

    1stGr8 Companion

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    Aug 4, 2009

    I have each child bring their own snack. I provide crackers or pretzels for students without snack. In the past I gave the kids 10 minutes in the morning, around 10:30. This year I will do it in the afternoon since I have 11:15 lunch.
     
  6. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    It was the tradition in our school for parents to take turns bringing in snack but I was a rebel and changed it and now almost all the other teachers are having each child bring their own snack. I changed it because despite what I asked, snacks would often be junk, I didn;t have to worry as much about allergies and many families now are vegan, organic, or whatever and have specific food requirements. Also I didn't have to worry about whether the family would remember or not. It has made my life easier.
     
  7. 2inspire

    2inspire Companion

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    Aug 4, 2009

    my students and I brainstorm a list of snacks at the beginning. I do get specific on here and use the word no. Ie... NO Chips or cookies of any kind, including 100 calorie cookies.

    This way the students know the expectations. If a student brings in an unhealthy snack then they go without that day. I do let them check for a substitute in their lunch to swap out but I don't allow them to eat it in class.

    As far as time, we eat when we're hungry. 10 min. after school starts...fine with me (mental note...check how often his happens...maybe a referral to our liasion), 5 min after lunch...that's fine too.
     
  8. fawyndra

    fawyndra Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2009

    I have healthy snack inspections each day. I give myself an extra 4-5 minutes before recess, and I have "snack inspector" as a class job. For the first month or so, it is training the class what counts as a healthy snack- and those get paid a class dollar, kids can bring out snacks that don't count as healthy... (like chips, pretzels, etc.) but they don't get paid, and I will not allow kids to bring out a dessert for snack (no cookies, brownies, etc.) After that, I can set up the classroom or do other things because my inspectors and the class know what can earn them a dollar, and I don't have to supervise it as much.

    It works pretty well, the kids learn how to find the healthy snack in their lunch, and some even "teach" their parents what counts, because they know what I will pay for. Also, they know they have to learn because everyone is an inspector at some time.

    During SAT week (and probably during testing days during the regular weeks this year) they can buy a granola bar with class money if they don't have a snack.

    I encourage you to try it. Kids will do a lot for a reward.
     
  9. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    Aug 4, 2009

    I am going to have snack this year in Kindergarten for the first time.

    I think that I will suggest that the kids bring in a healthy snack, but if they don't - I do not feel that it is my business to tell them what to eat or what not to eat. For me, there are certain responsibilites that I have as a teacher, such as teaching kids manners, or kindness, but monitoring what they eat, to me does not feel like my right or responsibility. IF a parent wants to send in a snack that might not fit my definition fo healthy, well, that to me, is their choice.

    we had an issue at our school once with a child bringing in a snack that was maybe cookies or chips, and the teacher did not allow the student to eat the snack, and the parent went all haywire. I kind of get that as a parent.

    I know it is better for kids to eath healthy snacks of course, but that to me is one of the lines that I do not cross as a teacher. JMHO There are so many other battles to fight for me.
     
  10. dunwool

    dunwool Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2009

    I really like the idea of using the snack and incorporating it into the classroom economy type of situation! That is a great idea and an easy way for students to understand what is healthy and what isn't. Thanks for the tip!
     
  11. smurfette

    smurfette Habitué

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    Aug 4, 2009

    Here's my snack section from my letter:

    Snacks: We have the last lunch this year, so students will be permitted to bring in a HEALTHY snack for after specials (11:20). Students who abuse the privilege by continually bringing in unhealthy snacks or distracting others with their snack may lose their snack privilege. Here are some examples of snacks that are allowed or not allowed. If you aren’t sure if a snack is permitted or not, don’t hesitate to ask!

    SNACKS ALLOWED AT SNACK TIME
    fruit/vegetables
    nuts
    peanut butter/crackers (especially whole-grain)
    cheese/crackers (especially whole-grain)
    pretzels
    low-sugar cereal
    breads (especially whole-grain)
    yogurt

    SNACKS NOT ALLOWED AT SNACK TIME
    candy
    chocolate
    doughnuts
    chips
    pastries
    Pop-Tarts
    cookies
    pudding

    Unhealthy snacks are usually high in sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and/or fat.
     
  12. smurfette

    smurfette Habitué

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    Aug 4, 2009

    Ah, in reading another post, I see I left off granola bars! Anything else I should add to the healthy snack list?

    I always wonder, what about Sun Chips? I say no chips, and there's always a student who tries to bring in Sun Chips. Does anyone here consider Sun Chips a healthy snack?
     
  13. fawyndra

    fawyndra Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2009

    I totally get this too... but I thought I would elaborate a little more on why I started my healthy eating thing with not allowing certain snacks (I actually have a funny story with it too...)

    My first year, I just repeatedly asked the parents to pack healthy snacks, I talked about it all the time in Monday letters, and we had a health unit on it, it was in my back to school talk etc. I would encourage the kids to eat healthy snacks, but I didn't check them or anything.

    Well, one day I had a kid that wasn't feeling well about half an hour before lunch, I sent him to the nurse, and the nurse found out that all this kid had eaten all day was a pack of Oreos (the little 4 pack) for snack, and that was why he was feeling sick. She gave him some more real food (don't remember what) and after lunch he was feeling much better. I talked to his mom after school that day, and nicely talked about how he wasn't feeling well because he had Oreo's for snack, and I was going to politely request that he have a healthy snack when she asked her son why did he didn't eat the apple she had packed for his snack.

    It was a revelation for me that only half the battle was getting parents to pack a healthy snack, the other half was getting the kids to pick the healthy snack and not the dessert out of their lunch before they go out.

    That was why I decided to do something to get the kids motivated to bring out the good snacks. As mentioned in my previous post, the only things I don't allow are the sugar bombs, i.e. desserts (fruit snacks are pretty sugar bombs too, but those they can bring out). I have had to go to battle once or twice over it, but I feel like I can defend my choice because having kids with a sugar high and then a sugar crash is not helpful for learning, and I do offer an alternative snack. Oh, and most of the time, the dessert kids are able to find an acceptable alternative in their lunch, and they don't go hungry.

    Now my story is with one of the battles... A boy was trying to take out pumpkin pie for snack, and I said that he could have it for dessert after lunch, but he had to choose another snack. He obliged. His mom came to me after school, and asked why he wasn't allowed to bring it out. I explained my no dessert policy, and she said that it was pumpkin pie, so it was healthy:confused::lol:... Oh... the thoughts that went through my head about how just because a pie has a fruit or vegetable in it doesn't make it healthy!!! But I decided to go with a much more pc choice of "I have to have a standard policy so that kids don't think I make exceptions, so unfortunately I can't allow any kind of pie for snack." She understood, and was fine after that.

    So, to sum up, I know that I walk a fine line by monitoring their food at all, but to me, it is worth a few battles to have a class that focuses better and are not on sugar highs from recess until they crash.

    p.s. wow... sorry for the book
     
  14. sophie1

    sophie1 Comrade

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    Aug 4, 2009

    Thank you all! It seems that generally, each student is responsible for their own snack. I will have crackers on hand for those who do not have a snack. And... healthy snacks are preferred. Now I need to brainstorm a list of good snack ideas and add them to my letter! Please send ideas as they are welcome... I did like the one list of suggestions that I already read, very helpful. Thank you!
     
  15. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Aug 5, 2009

    5th graders are old enough to remember to bring their own snack. It started two years ago because we were last to lunch and they were hungry enough to be disruptive and not paying attention.

    Now that lunch is at 11:30, I just don't see why they have to have one. But I'm not going to fight it. Eat a snack when I'm not teaching something. I'm not providing anything for anyone. Take away my money and call it a "furlough" day, and I can get real ugly.
     
  16. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Aug 5, 2009

    Some interesting ideas here. What about healthy pumpkin pie? Or other healthy foods that look like a dessert? I make pies and cookies without added sugar. My kids don't know the difference, and lots of times they have veggies in them.
     
  17. sophie1

    sophie1 Comrade

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    How would you word your letter to parents???
     
  18. Lynn K.

    Lynn K. Habitué

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    Aug 5, 2009

    I have had run ins with parents over this. I tell the parents and kids that they should have healthy snacks, but ultimately I am not their parent, and I let it go at a 'look' if a student brings junk. It doesn't happen often.
     
  19. natelukesmom

    natelukesmom Companion

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    Aug 5, 2009

    Each child in my class is responsible for bringing their own healthy snack. We usually have snacks around 10:30 in the morning (they are usually begging by then!)

    If a child forgets his/her snack then they can either hope another child will share with them, or if they're lucky I might have crackers in my desk. However, I do not usually supply students with a snack, and many have gone "without" if they didn't bring one.

    Sometimes kids didn't bring something that was exactly "healthy" but I don't make a big deal over it. I just tell them to bring something a little more "healthy" next time. It never bothered me that much.
     
  20. SPECIALEDMAN

    SPECIALEDMAN Companion

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    Aug 5, 2009

    Thank God for Middle and High School kids! No "snack time".
     
  21. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Aug 5, 2009

    Thank goodness our school provides ours.
     
  22. princessa48

    princessa48 Companion

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    My students are permitted to bring in their own healthy snacks. I refuse to provide snacks to those who forget. I tried doing that before, and eventually it got to the point where 4-5 of the same kids were forgetting their snacks every single day. I felt like certain parents were taking advantage of the situation. I did once have one boy that I discreetly provided a snack (sometimes even a lunch) for each day. He would come in crying each morning because his mom wouldn't wake up to feed him breakfast. DYFS was called about this and other abuse concerns, but nothing was ever done about it.
     

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