How do you discipline students?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Lyquidphyre, May 11, 2007.

  1. Lyquidphyre

    Lyquidphyre Comrade

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    May 11, 2007

    This is one of my application questions and even though I have an answer I'm concerned it might be too detailed or not detailed enough.

    This is my answer: (this is for a Secondary Position)
    "When a conflict occurs, if a verbal warning does not resolve the problem, I would address the student one on one. I would hope to discuss with them what they were doing wrong, what they should have been doing and what further consequences would arise if they continued. If the problem persists, a detention/referral would be issued along with a student written note to the parents (written during detention). If the problem becomes a daily issue a conference or phone call with the parent would be in order."

    Is that realistic for High School? Is that too much information? Not enough?
     
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  3. awaxler

    awaxler Comrade

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    May 11, 2007

  4. Lyquidphyre

    Lyquidphyre Comrade

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    May 11, 2007

    To be honest, that article doesn't help me much since it is talking about classroom management (granted, I agree with what it says in general and I appreciate the link). I personally feel that this question is in response to what happens when classroom management fails.

    My question, is my response way too specific?
     
  5. srh

    srh Devotee

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    May 11, 2007

    I can't answer your specific question, but I would perhaps add into your answer that you would "take steps within the policies of the school and district..." Sometimes we forget there may actually be policies that would be helpful and supportive! It's important for adminitrators to know that you wouldn't go way "off the wall" when frustrated. Understanding the site rules will also go a long way to giving you ideas as to what you CAN do.
     
  6. Lyquidphyre

    Lyquidphyre Comrade

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    May 11, 2007

    Thanks srh! I had thought about that, but I wasn't sure how I could word it w/o being too vague (unless that is what they want??).

    Maybe..
    "First and foremost, I would always follow district guidelines and their policies concerning discipline. Within those guidelines, verbal warnings, detentions, and parent-teacher conferences would be in order once an problem arises"
     
  7. srh

    srh Devotee

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    May 12, 2007

    That sounds great! And the good part is, having an answer like that helps you NOT go into too much detail one way or the other. I'm quite a talker, and I learned this lesson because I always felt I was about to go off the deep end. Note to self: srh, just answer the question in the most basic way...they will ask if they want more information!! :-D

    Sounds like you're doing a good job!
     
  8. Lyquidphyre

    Lyquidphyre Comrade

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    Haha, I have to do the SAME thing when it comes to talking too much. I also have to make sure I don't trail off and forget where I started
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 12, 2007

    I think you have to include a bit about why you're disciplining.

    A student who is talking gets a look, maybe a "Kirsten??" I always start small unless the offense warrents something bigger. But I would include an idea of proportional response: start small for the little infractions, but react appropriately when the offense is bigger (say, fighting.)

    Also, a little pre-emptive action goes a long way. If the rules and consequences are well laid out, if you develop a positive relationship with the class so they respect you-- sometimes (not always) the discipline tends to be a whole lot easier!
     
  10. meatball77

    meatball77 Comrade

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    May 12, 2007

    They've asked that in all of my interviews. It's somthing you need to sound confident about, espically if you're interviewing at a low income school.

    I use Assertive Dicipline with a set system of rewards and consaquences that are very clear to students. Students know exactly what will happen when they chose to follow the rules and what will happen if they choose to not follow the rules.
     
  11. texasmom

    texasmom Rookie

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    May 12, 2007

    I think the classroom management answer a step in the right direction. Isn't that what Harry Wong teaches us? "The number one problem in the classroom is not discipline; it is the lack of procedures and routines."

    I would first address the question with Harry's quote above, just to let the administrator know that I know how important a solid classroom management system is to being an effective teacher. Some teachers confuse procedures with rules. An ineffective teacher who has a lot of discipline problems in her classroom may not have taken the time to teach, and more importantly practice, established procedures. A few examples of procedures that should not be confused with rules are how to behave in the hallway, movement of students and papers, and how to enter the classroom. When enforcing the established procedures, I like to use Love & Logic to empower my students with better decision-making skills through a series of natural and logical consequences. I provide limits in a loving way to foster a respectful teacher/student relationship.

    When it comes to classroom rules and expectations, not to be confused with classroom procedures, I prefer to adopt the schoolwide discipline plan so that no matter where my students go, they encounter the same plan. I believe a schoolwide discipline plan is the most successful discipline plan. If a plan isn't in place, I will utilize a progressive discipline plan where the students are given consequences for repetitive offenses including, but not limited to, oral correction, detention, referral slips, and calls to parents. For repeat offenders I will also implement a behavior management contract to be completed by the student listing the offense, the consequence and the steps the student will take to change his or her behavior.

    Michele
     
  12. srh

    srh Devotee

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    May 12, 2007

    Alice, good points! After all, "If you fail to plan, you plan to fail." Having the routines, procedures, and consequences is a MUST for every single classroom. That in itself will go far in helping a teacher maintain order and promote learning.
     
  13. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    May 12, 2007


    Adam-

    This is terrific!! Thank you very much
     
  14. awaxler

    awaxler Comrade

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    May 12, 2007

    You're welcome :)


    That may be so, but even if that is the case I would still start your answer by explaining that you use a proactive approach to classroom management thereby reducing the chances of discipline problems arising in the first place...then you can explain what you do if and when problems do occur.
     
  15. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    May 12, 2007

    I have said that many times! I wholeheartedly believe structure needs to be in place and a teacher needs to take stock and analyze her students throughout the year to learn how to provide preventive maintence to minimize problems to begin with.

    The second part of what I believe is I must mean what I say and say what I mean. The students must learn to believe I will deliver whatever I say I will. I use a lot of different techniques but they depend largely on the type of class I have. The main goal is to have the students respect your word and thus your authority, have structure in place (and I also believe this isn't all about rules), learn your students and practice preventive maintenence and perhaps the largest one is learning what kinds of lessons and activities motivate them and what kinds will derail them. This year one of my main preventive maintence strategies is to stand in front of them at the beginning of most classes (I'm not the teacher so this isn't my choice) and state each rule 3 different ways and look for confirmation. Then I tell them what will happen if they do not comply. Then I encourage them and tell them I know they will be good (smile wide) and ask if they know that. THey then give me a high five slap and we begin the class. If one person reacts the wrong way, they sit out (or whatever the consequence is) and the others see I mean business. So after that person cooperates for a bit, I let them rejoin (they have to watch the lesson the whole time). This is 1st grade. The reason I say things 3 times is because these kids can't attend to what I say (ie, depends on the group of students) so I give them more chances to know what I say. It is all down somewhat fast and I only have about 4 rules so its not too bad. I only pick the 4 rules that causes this particular group of kids to become rowdy or off task easily.
     
  16. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    May 12, 2007

    One thing that amazes me is when a single student is the one causing the most problems and that particular teacher doesn't try to track and take stock and see what's causing the problem and if it is something the teacher can modify to help reduce it first.
     
  17. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    May 13, 2007

    Lyquidphyre-

    If you think they are just asking what you will do if something goes wrong, then still touch on one or two sentences that encompass the above. ESPECIALLY if there is not a question about classroom management.

    I would definitely include that you plan on having set procedures and rules (from day one) to help minimize confusion and that you will keep your kids actively involved so they don't get bored and cause problems. Mention that the main thing is that you follow through so they know you mean business. I would then say what you said in your first and second post.
     
  18. Lyquidphyre

    Lyquidphyre Comrade

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    May 15, 2007

    Thanks everyone! It's been busy around here and I've finally had the time to sit down and answer some questions. This is what I have for the question I mentioned above (using some of y'alls tips!). Let me know what you think:

    "First and foremost, I would always follow district guidelines and their policies concerning discipline. However, I hope to establish my classroom rules and procedures in such a way that discipline is not an issue. My students will be fully aware of all consequences and will sign a behavior contract to show their parents and myself they have read, understand and agree with my rules and expectations. When, and if, a conflict arises verbal warnings, detentions, and parent-teacher communication would be in order. "

    Still to vague?
     
  19. meatball77

    meatball77 Comrade

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    May 15, 2007

    Sounds perfect for secondary
     

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