How do you deal with students who do not bring HW?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by heavens54, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    What do you say to them on that day? Do you just shrug and say oh well? Do they take a zero? Do they have another day? Are you a little mad at them? Do you make them do it later, or during recess? Could you walk me through your process of dealing with students who have a 100 excuses as to why they don't have their HW that day? I need some coaching in this area. Thanks.

    :help:
     
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  3. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    At my school they attend lunch detention for not having their homework with them when it is collected. If the assignment was math or reading then they also receive a zero on that assignment.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Sometimes life gets in the way of homework. I understand that. So I tell my students that they get one out per nine weeks. When I check homework students will get marks in the gradebook. But at the end of the nine weeks when I tally up all the marks, if a student missed only one homework assignment I won't hold it against him. After that, their grade will be negatively affected. By how much depends on how often I check the homework. If I check it twenty times, missing and extra will cost them five points. If I only check ten times, that one missed homework will cost them ten.

    If a student doesn't have an assignment that I will actually take up and grade, he will be encouraged to bring it the next day for a late grade.
     
  5. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    We are not allowed to take HW as a grade at our school, but we do have to record how many they miss and make a note of it on report cards. so it does have an impact. How each teacher treats it is different. What I do does depend on how many studnets are missing homework during a period of time. My policy does change. But if they are a repeat offender there is a good chance that they will get lectured on occasion. If it is a student who usually does homework and forgets something I will just give them a look.
     
  6. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    I used to make students stay during one of their recesses. If I had recess duty that day, then they would come and sit by me outside.
     
  7. thirdgradebuzz

    thirdgradebuzz Comrade

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    They stay and do it at specials or during recess, their choice. I don't give a lot of homework. The average student only spends about 15 of their 45 minute specials class working on it.

    Occasionally, I give them 5 minutes to "perfect" their homework in class the next day and then I collect it and grade it as a quiz.
     
  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Have a policy with a consequence. Ours is 1 hour of detention after school(grades 5-8)/ 30 minutes if grades (1-4)--no exceptions. Guess what? We don't have a homework problem since we went to this policy 4 years ago.
     
  9. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Are you interested in who has "done" or who has "learned"? If the goal is to record quantity any form of tallying each piece of HW will probably suffice. On the report card there is usually a space which means how many although it is often masked incorrectly as "responsible" or some other character trait.

    If you are interested in learning (that is a goal, isn't it?) give a short quiz ON the HW. This can be done on back of HW as a warm-up when students enter. A few questions very similar to HW - not trying to fool anyone - will give you a better picture of who has learned and who has merely done. If anything is to be graded, grade the quiz not the HW. If a student doesn't have HW he/she uses a blank paper with quiz heading.
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I give all the homework for the week on Mondays and collect it on Fridays. That way families can make the decision when to work on the homework (no "but I have basketball on Wednesdays!") If they bring it in they get to put a sticker on a little incentive chart. The chart is large- it takes a couple of months to fill it but they like just putting the sticker up there. A completed chart earns lunch with me and an ice cream treat. If they don't bring it in they do it at recess on Friday. I only have 1-2 students who don't bring it in most weeks. I only give 5 points for homework for the entire week. I figure I have to give them something for doing it but I don't want it to be a large part of their grade. It's also just graded for completion because some students have tons of help at home and some students don't even have someone who speaks English at home.
     
  11. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    I had my students fill out a slip of paper while the other students corrected their homework. My rule was that they had to bring me the homework by the next morning or I would see them during lunch.
     
  12. FourSquare

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    I give homework each night and informally expect it the next day. However, everything must be in by Friday. I figure that takes care of the "life" excuses and gives kids a little flexibility.

    If they don't get everything in by Friday, they get a detention. Between working recesses and before school tutoring, I feel like they have plenty of time to do it.
     
  13. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    I like this idea. That way, if there was something going on, there's a little wiggle room.

    If students do not have it, what do you say to them? Do you ask them why they don't have it or didn't do it?
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    They get a zero (a "missing" in the gradebook, which calculates as a zero) until they turn it in. I will accept homework late until about a week before the end of the quarter. This semester I have instituted a late work policy where students will earn a maximum score of 75% on any work turned in after the due date. I don't like to give academic penalties for behavioral problems, but I felt like I had no other choice.
     
  15. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Feb 17, 2013

    Homework is assigned at the beginning of the week and collected at the beginning of the next week. It's usually 10 vocab words and maybe a 5-10 grammar questions. We do lots of games in class to practice the material. If they don't hand it it, it's a zero. I figure if they can't get it done in seven days, they aren't going to get it done. Handing it in four or six weeks late does nothing, as they've already been tested/quizzed on the material.

    We can't do detentions or hold them in at lunch. We can't hold them after school. Before school is my planning period. I have 126 students, so I'm not calling home when 15 or 20 don't do their homework.

    Fortunately, it's only 10% of their grade.
     
  16. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    We are a PBIS school, so if students do not have their homework done, they receive a minor. If they receive 4 minors within 1 month, they receive a major (meeting with principal, call home to parents). I also have them stay in for recess to finish it.

    I hardly give any homework, so I feel like my expectations are very manageable. I always tell parents to just write me a note if something comes up.
     
  17. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    I have found a system that works for me - last year, I graded a lot of homework and spent a lot of time chasing down kids to try to get them to turn in their work. I realized 2 things - a lot of them were just copying the work from their peers and that I was worrying more about their grades than they were.I was working harder than my students.

    This year I still assign the homework and take it up on a random basis. Before I collect it, we go over any problems that they might have. Even if I have a paper with a name on it, the students get 1 point out of a possible 1 point. However I give a weekly quiz that will be worth 8 - 15 points depending on number of problems. The quiz seperates those who do the work from those who have copied the answers from a buddy.

    I no longer followup on missing work nor give detention. I have shifted the responsibilty for earning a grade back to where it belongs and am doing way less paperwork (i.e. grading).

    Last year, I did not do many quizzes - mostly relied on the HW grades plus a few tests throughout the grading period. I realized that I had kids who had 90 averages on HW but 30's and 40 averages on tests. In our school HW/quizzes/daily work accounts for 2/3 of the student's grade. tests are 1/3.

    I have some students who passed my class last year on my old system but are failing my class this year. However I believe my grades are more reflective of their abilities and effort. No more cheating your way to a passing grade. I really feel better about things.

    Please note though that I teach HS, these methods might not be appropriate for younger children.
     
  18. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Well! My weekend homework is so simple, and just 1-2 pages.
    I move the STARS 3x for those who bring their homework. I have a STAR chart that goes with my STAR bottle; filled with little toys, pencils, erasers, etc. that I buy or the parents donate. For my Pre-Ks, the STAR bottle is a see through bottle, that I have sitting right where they can ooodle over what they want to get, and I hear them telling their friends that they want to get the dinosaur, OR the car, OR the little princess, etc. It's a bribery bottle to me, BUT to them it is a POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT thingy. For the ones who don't return their homework; I talk to the parents and remind them to return the homework folder. I date every Friday on the back of their folders, and initial it. The folders that are missing days are the ones whose folders were not returned on time.
    I stress how important it is for the parents to start doing this NOW, so come time when the children get to higher grades, IT WOULD BE A PIECE OF CAKE! Practice makes perfect, MOST of the time!:cool:
    The children who have older siblings like it when they do their homework while the older ones are doing theirs; according to the parents.
    Rebel1
     
  19. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    Great idea. I am chasing papers all of the time. It's becoming a huge struggle for me to get them to do their HW and turn it in on the on time. It's becoming a problem. I have heard every excuse in the book as to why they couldn't do it. It doesn't even take that much time. They just don't want to do it. And yes, I do care more about their grades then they do. But it is straining our relationship.
     
  20. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    I decided last year that homework completion is a battle I'm not going to fight.

    If the kids turn it in all week long, they get to eat lunch with me in the classroom while we watch a movie. I call it "Lunch Bunch."

    I give very minimal homework (one double-sided page...one side is spelling and the other is math).
     
  21. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    I really enjoy this approach. I am not nagging students anymore which is a relief for me and them. some things to consider - I do my grades on an online gradebook so the students have 24/7 access to their grades and all their missing work. You can remind them occasionally to check their grades or to see you during their breaks to discuss any missing assignments. My % of failing students has increased as compared to last year but I attribute that to more accurate assesment than to a "real" increase.

    Bottom line - I and my students are not playing cat and mouse games about missing work which leads to less tension. we don't waste time going back and forth over where the HW is/why it wasn't done. My grading has been cut down by about 75%. I am not grading copied work. I have more time for lesson planning. It also deals with differentiated instruction as it allows the student to choose how many HW problems he/she needs to do to master the material. (Of course, some of most "optimistic" students think that mastery is obtained simply by signing their name to a piece of paper.);)

    occasionally I will project the class gradebook on the projector so students can get an idea of how much work is missing from that particular class. I do this only when things get a bit out of hand. (I delete names of course before doing this). When this happens I will invite the P in so she is in the loop.As I said, I am really pleased. You can PM me if you would like any other details.
     
  22. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    I find it interesting that you consider late work a behavior problem as opposed to an academic one. Not sure if I agree or disagree, but I just find it intriguing.
     
  23. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I get where Caesar is coming from. Late work doesn't show you, as the teacher, what the academic abilities of a student are. It just shows you that they do not turn in work on time (behavioral).

    But I personally do not have that much of a problem penalizing behavior with academic consequences (grades). Sometimes behavioral issues do not have an obvious natural consequence with academics. I think that submitting work late does though.
     
  24. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I feel that a student's grade should be a true reflection of their mastery. Earning a zero on an assignment because you chose to play video games instead isn't really the same as earning a zero because you failed to master the concept. The truth is that I don't really know if the video game player actually failed to understand the concept, whereas I can clearly identify a student who tried but still failed. Indeed, the video game player may have a perfect understanding of the concept. The thing is, however, that I'm not a mind reader. Ultimately, I justify it to myself (and to admin, if the need ever arises) because no evidence of mastery is exactly that--no evidence of mastery.
     
  25. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    this again reinforces why I put so little emphasis on grading HW and more on quizzes. If the student has learned the material through classroom participation and doing assigned classwork (and demonstrates it on a quiz), do I really care that he didn't do the additional 10 - 20 HW problems? again I think grade level influences this discussion but I deal with HS kids only.
     
  26. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I have a similar system - homework packets go out on Fridays (!) and are returned to me on Thursday. No one is required to do homework on the weekend, but many of my students get a "head start" on the words & stories, and all but one of my parents have told me that they appreciate it! In addition, several of my students are in a tutoring program after school, and they receive help with the work (by an actual teacher).

    If a students doesn't return the HW on Thursday, their HW grade (a conduct grade, since my packet covers all subjects) goes down to a B. It goes down a letter grade each day it is late. I have had to purchase WAY TOO MANY homework folders, and spend too much time working on it for it not to be returned. In all honesty, I'm not so much interested in if the students actually finished all the work - I'm more interested in (1) whether they attempted it and (2) teaching them the responsibility of keeping up with it and returning it on time.
     
  27. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Feb 17, 2013

    [​IMG]

    :lol:

    No! I talk to my kids enough to generally know if something major is going on....however I'm not going to chase down their homework. They turn it in or they don't. I don't really give all that much and they need to be responsible for their work.
     
  28. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Sweet Brown!!!!!!!
     
  29. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Very interesting. My GS is one who hardly ever does any HW. He says it is boring. I do understand his point of view, as reviewing the same concept over and over is boring. He does not get the "show your teacher you know it by doing your homework."

    He does have a 504 that tells his teachers that he can be graded on evaluations only.

    I mention his situation as I suspect not all children learn by doing homework. I don't have an answer, but wanted to point out that homework is not the only way to learn.
     
  30. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    And this is where it gets tricky being a teacher. We don't have the luxury of catering to each individual student. We aren't private tutors. Most of us have many students in class; I myself have about 150 students this year. I can't teach one lesson 150 different ways or have 150 different expectations for my students. I have to have some general guidelines that apply to all or most of my students. Of course, if there's a 504 in place, I will alter what I do in the classroom. Barring that, however, I do have an expectation that students conform to how I handle things in my classroom.

    This doesn't mean that I don't differentiate (I do) or that I am not flexible (I am) or that I don't take my students' individual needs into account (I do). But the truth of the matter is that I'm responsible for teaching my content to all my students, with their tremendous range of abilities. In order for me to do that successfully, I have to have some general procedures in place.

    I do expect that students do practice work. I do expect that they do the same sort of activity many, many times in order to get it down pat. I tell them that it's the same as being on the football team or the basketball team: do you think that every player is going to make every free throw, or even most free throws, if they don't practice? No, of course they won't. Professional athletes spend hours upon hours shooting free throw after free throw, over and over and over again, to develop the muscle memory and give themselves the best possibility opportunity of success. The same thing is true with the work we do in my class. We might conjugate a very every day for the entire school year; that's 180 verbs! It gets repetitive and boring at times, yes, but it's still necessary.

    For the record, when students tell me that it's "boring", I usually translate that to mean that they don't understand it and aren't willing to put forth the effort to learn how to do it.
     
  31. platypusok

    platypusok Companion

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    Feb 17, 2013

    I don't assign homework per se. They generally have enough time to finish their assignment in class. If they don't because they are talking, staring off into space or frantically doing their history homework then they have to take it home.

    One day late and it's an 80. 2 days late and it's a zero. This is according to the school handbook. I'll take late work until about a week and a half from the end of the quarter.
     
  32. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Feb 18, 2013

    I know it is difficult to provide a different assignment to each student. My DD and I stay on top of grades, and talk with the teachers. We support whatever he teacher decides to do regarding evaluation. The only consideration we do ask for is more time to complete the assignment. We think this is a great gift to my GS. If he finds that extra time does not help, we support the lower grade. We are at a point that my GS needs to make his own decisions about his life. We also realize that he may not graduate and we will deal with that when the time comes. Teachers can't force students to learn.
     

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