How do you call them to sit on the carpet?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by JustT, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. JustT

    JustT Comrade

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I would like to be faster and smoother.

    Recently, our language arts director modeled discussion groups by having them sit on the floor in the front of the room. However, I teach 4th grade and putting assigned tape on the floor seems too babyish.

    Instead of redirecting for 5 minutes, how do you avoid students from sitting by their buddy, hiding behind classroom furniture, inching their way to where they want to sit, etc.

    I've given them a parameter, however, since I'm deparmentalized I think they tend to know different rules apply to different teachers (some who allow conversations to occur when the teacher is trying to lead the discussion)
    .
    I've also told them to sit in the same spot, however, they tend to forget... and so do I. Sometimes they even want to start discussion groups the way their earlier class did. Before I end up with the same mess..... or getting rid of group discussions on the carpet.... any ideas?
     
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  3. gab

    gab Comrade

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    Jul 15, 2008

    After a few days of school I plan 4 rows for floor time. I see which students make good choices in their seat mates and I also keep in mind those students who really do need to be close to the front due to vision concerns as well as attention abilities and academic needs.

    I make a seating arrangement and we practice. Students walk around the room and then meeting in rows when a timer goes off or I ring a bell. We do this several times a day for just a few days and my kids pick it up. They are young but they learn quickly who they have to their right or left.

    These spots are semi-permanent as I do make changes as needed, be it new or moved students, students not able to keep from distracting one another, etc.

    I also use "landmarks" in the room to help students know their spot even if there are students missing.

    For your older students you may want to choose organizing them by alphabetical order, first name or last. You could also do it by other criteria such as birthday month order, height, etc.

    Good luck!
     
  4. gab

    gab Comrade

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    Jul 15, 2008

    P.S. When I need them to meet on the floor I just announce: ''Meet me on the floor'' and they organize themselves and if needed, one another.
     
  5. JustT

    JustT Comrade

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I think I like your idea Gab. I'll just place some of those rubber spots for those students who need the assigned "spot".
     
  6. mdith4him

    mdith4him Companion

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I think those are good ideas, too, Gab. I think for 4th graders you can be upfront with them and tell them they can sit where they want, but if they start goofing off or abusing the privilege then you will assign them spots.
     
  7. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    Jul 15, 2008

    How do you arrange the seating in the classroom?Are they arranged in groups? They might sit in these groups at the carpet,and might even receive grades for the groups 1.behavior 2.participation.
    You could assign sits at the carpet the same way you set up a seating plan.Keep a seating chart so you will not forget.
    I find if they are given a choice to sit where they want ,it leads to arguments over where they will sit,and too many buddies sitting together an fooling around. Not every class is the same.You decide what will work best with your classes.
     
  8. love_reading

    love_reading Comrade

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I teach first, so I do a lot of whole group on the carpet. We do a lot of "turn to your partner" to share and discuss stories and information. Carpet behavior has to be taught, modeled, and practiced just like everything else--which I am sure you know. I try and make a lot of anchor charts with my students and hang them in the room. We do one for "How to sit on the carpet" and another for "How to turn to your partner". Also, my students sit 4 kids to a table and I switch them around at the beginning of every month. When they come to the carpet they have to sit next to their table buddy. They have an assigned spot to sit every time. Some days I might let them earn the privilege to sit anywhere and they think it's special. This system is the only way I can keep control on the carpet! Good luck!
     
  9. baber2be

    baber2be Rookie

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I assign each student a day of the week. So for example 5 kids were "Monday" 5 kids "Tuesday" etc. Then depending on the day of the week I would call those kids to the carpet first. So if it was Wednesday I would say "Wednesday people please join me on the carpet. Then, Thursday..." When it was their day of the week they got to sit in the row closest to the teacher. That way I didn't have the same kids always trying to sit in the front. After the first couple of days everyone remembered their day of the week. I hope this makes sense.
     
  10. gab

    gab Comrade

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    Another plus for assigned rows is that I can dismiss just by calling their row. If we are at our desks, I can call a row to meet at the floor or go grab materials, etc. I can do that at the end of our floor time as well. I use this for lining up to leave the room as well.

    And even though we discuss that 'there is a line for a reason' students will often mob and calling rows eliminates a lot of the mob scenes that can occur.

    This really does simplify things for me but you have to find what works for you and your kidlets.
     
  11. tgi1515

    tgi1515 Comrade

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    Jul 16, 2008

    Well, Pre-K is a long way from 4th grade, but I call my 4yr olds to the circle with certain songs. When they hear Greg & Steve, 5 Little Monkeys, or Dr. Jean they immediately put things away and go straight to their "spot" in the circle.

    I went to a workshop a few years ago (they used a Bose CD player...wow) where they used music to do everything. It was also for older kids.... just more sophisticated music. The workshop leader would play upbeat music until we found our chairs. She would talk to us about something, tell us to find 3 other people to ask the something to while she played the music. When the music turned off, we got quiet to hear the next set of instructions.

    This is where I learned the magic words, "When I say "go", I want you to...." This has saved me the MOST TIME with students. They have to wait until you say "go" before they start doing the set of instructions (they actually hear all the instructions).... I hardly ever have to tell them a second time.

    We have to practice everything lots of times in Pre-K tho.....
     
  12. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Jul 16, 2008

    As far as calling them, I do my give me five, give the clean up directions and then count down from 7, or 20 or however long I think they need in order to be cleaned up. When I say ZERO, they all say it with me, and focus their eyes on me for the next instructions, lessons, etc.

    It was hard on the carpet this last year because kids were saving spots, or moving to sit by someone different, or just arguing about spots. I timed the amount of time we spent getting onto the carpet one day and it was a total of 7 minutes! In one day! The assigned seats is the quickest but the kids hated it. I always let them start with picking their own spots. If that doesn't work, they get boy-girl seating... if THAT doesn't work, it gets assigned. I had to do all three this year, and then even once more the boy row/girl row thing and no more circle at all. That never happened before. Most years, I do boy-girl for about a month, and they figure out how to sit quickly and quietly.

    In my class I usually start with a lot of freedom, if it is not used responsibly, I take it away until I can trust them again and then give it back. Normally this works. Last year it didn't but in the past it was fine. I have also had classes that didn't care a smidge about gender, and sat by anyone and everyone. That's the dream!
     
  13. GD2BQN

    GD2BQN Comrade

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    Jul 16, 2008

    I do alot of what Gab does. I teach 4th grade, too, and have them sit on the rug in 4 rows of 3 and 4 students on stools/crates. The inattentive kids sit in front and the bigger kids in back. They have assigned seating, however, every Monday I pick 4 different students to sit on the stools rotating through my list. If they are unable to handle the stools they lose their opportunity and sit on the rug. If a child is continuously disruptive they have to sit at their desk :down:!!

    If I call them to the rug I just say "okay, let's sit on the rug" and they do. I, too, dismiss by rows.
     
  14. teacherlissa

    teacherlissa Comrade

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    Jul 20, 2008

    When I call my kids to the carpet, I always ask what they had for dinner the night before. I might say, "If you had chicken for dinner last night, come sit on the carpet."
    They love to hear what everyone had for dinner. I, myself, am also interested to know.
     
  15. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Jul 20, 2008

    I vary it a lot. If there are only a few students on task, I'll call those students first, and then magically the other students all get on task and peer at me to see if I've noticed they're behaving again. ;) Otherwise, I'll call the east side of the room, then the west, then the north, etc., or I'll call the people with red shirts, then blue shirts...or with slip-on shoes, then tie shoes...etc. I find some new way to do it all the time. Same with calling them to line up before recess or lunch. :)
    I also have a rule that when you're called, you go sit in the first available spot--no moving to the very back, and no saving spots for friends.
     
  16. cb4pebbles

    cb4pebbles Companion

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    Jul 20, 2008

    I have a LOT of those singing critters (you know...the ones they sell around Valentines and pretty much every holiday). I usually use them as my clean up and go to your desk signal. But you could use one as your cue to go to the carpet. Just push the little guys hand and while he is singing they have to make it to the carpet.
     

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