How do the interviewers ...

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by lionsmane, Jun 4, 2013.

  1. lionsmane

    lionsmane Rookie

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    decide what questions to ask their candidates? Do interviewers typically ask all the same questions to each of their interviewees, or do they base their questions off each applicant's level of experience/qualifications?

    I only have student teaching and some subbing experience, and I'm nervous that when I go into an interview, I will be asked something I have absolutely NO experience with, such as different curriculum, etc. I have been researching as much as I can and brushing up on things I know they'll ask (about myself, behavior, etc) but I consider myself a "newbie" so I know there are things I just won't know because I haven't been in the profession for very long. I was on an interview last week (didn't get the position) but I felt the questions were very appropriate for the level of experience I have.

    I have another interview today with a district I'm really interested in, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed and a positive attitude:)
     
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  3. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    In my district we are required to ask the exact same questions to each candidate. The interview team writes the questions but once we start interviewing for a position we can't change them.
     
  4. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Your best bet may be to look through the Job Seekers section of the forum. There are a lot of sample questions that many HR folks seem to use time and again. That way, you can start thinking about your possible answers.
     
  5. teachart

    teachart Comrade

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    My best advice is to answer every hypothetical job with an actual example, but DON'T link it to student teaching or subbing. For example, I was asked how I would handle a 5th grader that says he hates art and doesn't want to do the project. I said "Well I had a student in 5th grade say that when we were doing the portrait lesson I just showed you. I talked to Jerome* and discovered that he was feeling very anxious about drawing a realistic self portrait. I have found that most students do not really hate art but feel inadequate. After talking to Jerome I was able to give him individual coaching and help him be successful."

    I did not say "When I was student teaching I had a student that..."

    Otherwise, brush up on the curriculum you DO know. If they ask about a program you are unfamiliar with, be honest! But say "I have a lot of experience with _____ curriculum which utilizes ____ to _____ blank."

    You already have a tremendous amount of experience to draw on and you will do great in an interview!
     
  6. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    On the committees I've served on, we developed a list of questions together. The same questions were used for all of the candidates, but follow up questions were on the fly.
     
  7. Rhesus

    Rhesus Comrade

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    That is how it's always worked on interview committees I've been on too.
     
  8. InterviewTips

    InterviewTips Rookie

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    Answer to how do the interviewers decide what questions to ask their candidates?

    So, how do interviewers decide on what questions to ask a candidate? Sometimes interviewers have a standard set of questions that they want to ask every single person who is interviewing for a specific job. This is actually helpful because it makes it easier for the interviewer to compare one candidate to the next. Often these questions are about three different areas. First, do your skills match what they need? Second, do you have the commitment to the job that they require for you to perform well? Lastly, do you fit the culture of their organization? That being said, many interviewers do ask different questions at every candidate and sometimes these questions do relate to specifics of the candidates background. If someone is coming from a different industry, they are going to want to focus on more questions about how their skills apply to the job that they are after. If someone has less experience they are going to ask more questions about energy, motivation, and the ability to learn compared to someone who has more experience in which case they'll likely be focused on ability to start actually working from the first day on the job. I think if you have done well in previous interviews for similar positions chances are likely that you are going to see similar questions this time around. If you are interviewing for a teaching job there going to want to know about your curriculum design abilities, your teaching philosophy, your ability to relay to students, why you got into teaching the first place and that relates to regardless what level you are in your career.
     

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