How do I teach word attack?

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by ~Nicole, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. ~Nicole

    ~Nicole Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2007

    :help:So, I'm out of my element here as a fourth grade teacher but in my tutoring group I have one student at a Primer level and the other two are 1.7 and 1.8.

    As I've worked with them I can see that they really don't have any strategies to figure out a word. What would you suggest I do with them?

    Teaching reading is really hard for me-mostly because I've never struggled with it. I was reading by age three and I can't seem to break it down in my mind.

    TIA
     
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  3. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Sep 20, 2007

    do word sort activities with them. Let them see how you can stretch a word..... pull it apart, etc. a lot of talking out loud too.
     
  4. ~Nicole

    ~Nicole Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2007

    tell me more about word sort
     
  5. teach1st

    teach1st Comrade

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    I am in kind of the same boat. I will be tutoring two sixth grade students. I am a first grade teacher. Their weakness is breaking words apart and using different reading strategies when reading. How do I teach them these skills without making it too easy or boring them with first grade information. My line of thinking is for 6 to 7 year olds. I am nervous about working with the sixth graders and making improvements in their reading at a sixth grade level. Any ideas?
     
  6. MissTexas

    MissTexas Rookie

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    Sep 20, 2007

    Try going back to the basics. Sound out words and even break the words into syllables and blend the words. You could also go into the actual spelling rules of attack. Spelled with a tt and the /c/ sound spelled ck because of the short vowel sound in front of it.
     
  7. ~Nicole

    ~Nicole Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2007

    we do the rules of spelling during word study-I've been trying to incorporate that also in breaking apart the words

    teach1st-We use the STAR test to determine reading level. After my students took the test I pulled these three aside and told them (and showed them in the library) which books were appropriate for them.

    I explained that the books might not be interesting for them to read but that to be a good reader we had to concentrate on books we could read not books. I told them what the numbers meant (1.7-1st grade) and what we were going to do to help them get where they need to be (4.2)
     
  8. teach1st

    teach1st Comrade

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    We have the STAR program as well. I have tested for their reading level. They are about a year behind; however, they need first grade strategies to help them move further up the ladder to be on grade level. I do not want to give them first or second grade material to read and improve the strategies but not their levels. Does that make sense? What types of things can I do with a fifth grade level reader that needs first grade strategies and needs to be a sixth grade level reader?
     
  9. paulap

    paulap Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2007

    have you ever used Great Leaps? It is a wonderful phonics program that you use with them each day, about 5 minutes a day. It really works!!
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 23, 2007

    What about working backwards from spelling? Have them dictate a sentence - or maybe use a sentence that everyone hears all the time - and work with them on guessing how the words are spelled and why they're spelled that way.

    Or work with them in one of Dorling Kindersley's Eyewitness books or one of Usborne's good nonfiction books - something highly illustrated and high interest but written fairly simply.
     
  11. 1stGr8

    1stGr8 Companion

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    Sep 23, 2007

    We use several strategies in my room.

    1- Look for chunks in words (word families)
    2- Look for little words in big words
    3- Look at the beginning sound
    4- Use the picture for clues
    5- Ask, "Does it sound right?"
    6- Ask, "Does it look right?"
    7- Backtrack and read it again
    8- Skip it and come back
    9- Search for words that look or sound familiar
     
  12. teach1st

    teach1st Comrade

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    Sep 24, 2007

    What is the Great Leaps program? Where do you get it? Tell me more! It sounds like it would fit into the tutoring time slot perfectly.
     
  13. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 24, 2007

    Do any of you use your morning agenda for this purpose? What about asking the kids to find words within words, for example. Or you could put a few similar sounding words in the body of the morning message and ask them to find words that rhyme.
     
  14. paulap

    paulap Rookie

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    Great Leaps is a phonics program that you use 3-5 days a week. It only takes 5 minutes a day. It is repititive, timed lessons using phonices, phoneme awareness, phrases, and short stories. The student tries to read it correctly within a minute, and they repeat this practice until they master it. It builds their fluency, and some kids just never got the pure phonics when they were young, and they need this. It really works. I think you can find it under GreatLeaps.com. Have you ever used the DAR for assessing?It is a wonderful tool to find the exact weakness in your student's reading. good luck!
     
  15. teach1st

    teach1st Comrade

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    Oct 3, 2007

    paulap,
    I presented the title one and principal with info about the Great Leaps program. Do you have any success stories or anything I can use to give then a better picture of how it works in a classroom setting. The website had great info, but I know the principal is looking for more hands on experience.
     
  16. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Yes, this is what we do in my school. It is a great way to multitask using the morning message.
     
  17. firstgradeteach

    firstgradeteach Comrade

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    Oct 3, 2007

    I am tutoring after school.... I have fourth and fifth graders. We are suppossed to use Academy of Reading. They use this individually. It uses audio for sound discrimination and visual pictures for matching. It has only been 2 weeks... so I do not know how much it has helped. I do know that a few teachers in my school really like it, but said it doesn't make a difference unless they use it at least 3 days a week.

    I also use the strategies like 1stgr8. This year I have them on a paper with picture reminderse of the strategies. On reallygoodstuff they have hands with the reading strategies on it. They are nice, but my first graders need more visual reminders and the hands only have words.
     
  18. paulap

    paulap Rookie

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    Oct 3, 2007

    We had great results at our school. I worked in a Literacy Success program, and after working with a group of 4 -2nd graders, every day, they all moved up a couple of levels in reading. One little boy definitely had a learning disability and was held back, but he still improved after about 6 months. All of a sudden it worked for him! It was the greatest thing! He was so proud! I hope your school will try it. But you do have to use it correctly. It needs to be used 3-5 days a week. Some classes even trained a few volunteers to come in and do it. Good Luck!
     
  19. smile10

    smile10 Rookie

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    Oct 19, 2007

    I would suggest a great book called "The ordinary parent's guide to teaching reading" by Jessie Wise. I think it can be used with any age. It makes teaching reading simple and systematic, breaking it down, from easier to harder words. You can do the lessons as fast or as slow as you need to. You can skip the ones you don't need. You can do some reading from the earlier lessons as review and to build the kids' confidence and then move on to the harder lessons. Each lesson includes sentences and/or short stories or poems made of appropriate level words.
     

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