How do I respond to my principal's email about how things are going if things aren't

Discussion in 'General Education' started by futureteach24, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. futureteach24

    futureteach24 Companion

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    Aug 30, 2012

    going so well?

    My dept. mates are great. Some of my student's are so sweet and hardworking, but some of them are having some difficulties in terms of behavior.

    I'm a first year, high school teacher and I think it's a mix of being a "too nice" (what people have told me) and "looking like a kid" (what quite a few people have told me). I have tried to toughen up a bit, but it doesn't seem to be working:(
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 30, 2012

    You respond truthfully, or you ask for an appointment so you can talk face to face.

    Your principal is looking out for you-- that email was a friendly way to check in and help before any problems become serious. Graciously accept that help, particularly in the area of classroom managment.
     
  4. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Aug 30, 2012

    Ask your P for help.
    I would have the convo in person.
    Spend time reflecting on things you can try to be more effective. Offer those ideas to your P and get input from your P.

    I've seen a career start to derail in the 2nd week of school and no matter how much support was offerred, it was ignored or shaken off as "I got it, no worries," until it was too late. There was not a 2nd year offerred to get it right.
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Send your P an e-mail asking to meet in person. Then have an honest conversation about what is going on, what you/teammates believe the problem is, and what you plan to do to combat the issue. Ask for advice on your ideas and be open to other advice given.
     
  6. MissApple

    MissApple Companion

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    Be open and honest. Point out where things are going well, but express that you need help in terms of behavior management. You never know what resources they may have for you. If your principal is good, they've always got their ear to the ground to learn new tips and tricks.

    If the behavior is just a bit of rowdiness, you may be able to find a better behavior management system. if you have aggressive or EBD kids, a few quick visits from APs or other disciplinary staff can help. If the kids think you're friends with the big, scary AP who used to be a linebacker, your voice may carry more weight :lol:

    As for being too nice, it can be an issue, especially if the kids don't know you. They have no reason to respect you. Take some time to build a rapport with them and, with any luck, they'll behave because they want you to be happy, not because they're afraid of you. That's how I had to do it anyway, since I also look young, and can't keep a straight face to save my life. Don't be afraid to hand out some detentions though and show that you ARE serious.

    Don't know if it will help, but you can check out Whole Brain Teacher, which helped me with a rambunctious class last year, as well as Class Dojo, a behavior management system.

    If you go to the principal armed with some options for what you can try, you turn that weakness into two strengths: willingness to ask for help, and proactiveness in trying to find solutions.
     
  7. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Aug 30, 2012

    I agree with the above...meet in person and be open and honest. I would also would make sure to say the many good things that are going on in your room too...as I am sure they are it's just not always easy to see them. Tell your P that your team is great too.

    Your P is probably quite aware of the potencial difficulties you may be facing. challenging students and parents tend to be repeat offenders...sigh.
     
  8. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Aug 30, 2012

    Agreed to all above. Better to ask for help now than to be observed unfavorably later.
     
  9. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Aug 30, 2012

    All this is great advise, especially the last paragraph.

    Do NOT ignore the problem or the email.
     
  10. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 30, 2012

    In addition to the wonderful advice above, you might want to check with your union as well - ours offers new teacher classes - on classroom management, paperwork any number of topics, and they are free!
     
  11. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Do you have a mentor?
     

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