How do I let them know I mean buisness?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by JulesW, Dec 16, 2004.

  1. JulesW

    JulesW Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2004
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 16, 2004

    I am a first year teacher, teaching remedial English to 9, 10, and 11th graders. I got the reputation for being easy after my first semester, but I plan to kick it up a couple notches in Jan! I only wrote 2 people up my first semester (I liked to deal w/ behavior probs myself..) but this semester I am not going to have the patience to deal w/ everything..I'm going to be STRICT.

    I need advice!!!
     
  2.  
  3. Prissypants

    Prissypants Companion

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    191
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 16, 2004

    I had a hard time with this one, too. My first year, everybody told me, "Start off strict, then you can ease up." I thought they were crazy. Hindsight is 20/20, as they say.

    I too, tried to toughen up the second semester. It worked out okay, but prepare yourself for a long year. They'll never get over the fact that you were a softy, and now a hard a**. That is, unless you are the lucky one who gets a whole new batch of kids each semester.

    If I were you, I'd go in on the first day of the new semester, and tell everybody that what we've done so far isn't working. We need to set some guidelines. This will let them feel like they are a part of the process and not be shocked when you spring it on them. Explain that you feel like things are not going as they should, and by setting some ground rules, they will know what is expected of them. It will save them the annoyance of having you suddenly snap.

    I know a lot of people will disagree with me on getting them to be a part of the new rules and guidelines. But I found that I always had better results when I let my students be a part of the process, and talked to them like we were a team. At the age you're dealing with, they think they are adults. They want to be treated as such. They're not, but they should be respected. They know how to act, but you have to admit, that when someone will let you get away with stuff, you tend to try to get away with stuff.
     
  4. JulesW

    JulesW Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2004
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 16, 2004

    thanks so much for your advice. that sounds like a great plan :love:
     
  5. SpanishSRTA

    SpanishSRTA Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 24, 2005

    try this---citizenship points

    I am a new teacher as well. I teach Spanish to 9th, 10th and 11th graders. I am a petite blonde, and I can't help but to smile all the time. I, too, was known this past semester as the fun, easy, new teacher. I run a very laid back class, but I am comfortble with it. I was having a few behavior problems-mainly talking out of turn, but I believe that is my own fault from starting the year with such a laid back atmosphere.

    This second semester, I have added a new category to my grading scale and it works wonders!!! As 10% of the students' grade, I have come up with a "citizenship" grade. Each day, the students will earn one citizenship point. They can get this point taken away if they 1) don't bring the necessary materials, 2) make inappropriate comments to the teacher/classmates 3) Bring food/drink in my classroom 4)Sleep or do not participate and then I also explained points can be taken away for other applicable activities.

    Once a student looses his/her point for the day, they can never earn it back. I am amazed at how this is working. Students who never brought their books are actually bringing them and the talking has significantally cut down.

    When grading time comes, just count up how many days are in the quarter or semester or whatever, and then subtract how many points the student had taken away. For instance, I do this system by quarter so my students can keep up to 58 points (one for each day.)

    When students realize their behavior is effecting their grade, they really change their opinions about how they act. Especially with new female teachers, I don't think they value our "discipline" techniques nor take them seriously. This way, they are hurting their own grade. You have to be very strict with this system when you begin it though so the kids know you are serious about implementing it.

    Hope this helps!
     
  6. daysy_may

    daysy_may Groupie

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,258
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2005

    I'm kinding having the same problem, I'm teaching 7-9th grade ld. Since Christmas break, everyone is bringing in attitude to my class. I don't know if it's because we haven't had one snow day yet and they need a break, or what's going on. The girls are starting to roll their eyes, get huffy, and "snort" so to speak when you ask them to do something. One girl said she wanted detention. I ignored her and the problem she was doing (not doing what she was suppose to), went away. Next time it didn't I wrote her up and she got detention. She came back to class saying "the principal didn't do anything, just gave me detention" (so I'm guessing detention is no big deal then to her?????) The boys, it takes them several times to get on track, instead of talking. I could go on and on even more, but I won't. It was not like this before Christmas. I'm just at my wits end here and needed to vent, if anyone has anymore sugesstions, that'd be great!!!
     
  7. litlmama

    litlmama Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    252
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2005

    I've had them call parents/guardians from class to let them know they were going to be sent to the office and the reason they were going. I ALWAYS dial the parent who is at work. This has helped in many cases.
     
  8. carebear78

    carebear78 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2005

    Someone once gave me some helpful advice when students are getting restless and disregarding classroom rules and procedures. Start off the next class by asking them how they feel things have been going, and share with them that you aren't pleased with the way things have been. Tell them that it is the first day. You're starting over. Review policies and procedures and see if there's anything that needs to be modified. Everyone needs a little refresher now and then. I think it's helpful to let them know that you take partial responsibility for their negative behaviors. The reason I have had that problem myself is because I let it go too long. Jump on bad behaviors and attitudes right away. Let them know if there have been times when you got a little cranky with them and apologize. Let them know that you care about them and aren't just doing this because you enjoy being mad and frustrated.

    I really like the idea about calling the parents right then in class, if you have a phone in your room. I believe that taking away points does nothing for the students who don't care about their grade or passing. It all depends on the type of students you have in your class.

    Good luck!
     
  9. sdhudgins

    sdhudgins Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2004
    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2005

    OH be careful about including behavior in your grade... it can be considered "illegal" depending on how it's done. Our school was told by our lawyer: You grade work, you discipline behavior.

    I've found with my students sticking to my guns is the way to go. I do not look my age (which is only 28 anyhow, but...) but I'm the teacher they don't like to see coming on duty, or anything else like that.
    I lay out the plan to them, stick to it.

    Make a plan, make it clear to your class, post it in your class, and show them you mean it.

    I work at a school where I have the option to swat, but never have, the year I had it posted as consequence #3 they never pushed me past 1 so I took it off again. If they learn you mean business you really do get to lighten up a little
     
  10. Sha-sha

    Sha-sha New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 3, 2005

    January is the hardest longest month of the year. If you can make it through January you are doing well, just hang in until it's over. There are several reasons it is such a hard month and if you understand them you will better be able to deal with them. The first reason is the obvious that they came off a long break and probably slept until noon everyday so they are very tired and some of them did nothing but play video games or watch tv their whole break so they went from bliss (home) to torture (school). The second is the cold. In some places it is so cold they cant go outside or don't want to go out, so the problem is that they are restless. And then there is the fact that there are 4 big weeks in January with no breaks and no hope of any breaks anytime soon. The closer it gets to spring break the better their behavior will get because then they will have that break to look forward to. Oh and the really big one is that us teachers spent our winter break preparing all those great lessons and neat things we want them to do. I know that I usually do overkill in January just because I have 2 weeks to plan and I remember all the things i forgot to get done earlier so I add those too. We spent our vacation basically planning for them to work.
    One way to combat the January sluggishness is to plan a few activities just for fun. A great high school/junior high incentive is to let them earn a no work day or play bingo for prizes (just go to your local dollar store and spend about 5 bucks on a few items like pencils, note books, stationary, also soda, candy bars, twinkies etc. or you could have them bring gifts to use as prizes), or have a root beer float day (ask each student to bring $1 for a fun fund, this will actually give you enough for a couple parties and bingo prizes). Another idea is to let them listen to their music in class. We sometimes forget that the O.K.'s need fun too.
    Elementary is easy, if you want them to behave just offer them 10 extra recess minutes if they behave for a certain period of time or even a read-a-thon. This breaks up some of the time if they have something to look forward to doing.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. VAMath
Total: 390 (members: 2, guests: 359, robots: 29)
test