How do I get started with centers???

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by tmichrod, Jul 19, 2012.

  1. tmichrod

    tmichrod Rookie

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    Jul 19, 2012

    I am going to begin my second year of teaching this year. I teach first grade at a Christian school. I really would like to implement learning centers into my class. I have never done anything like this before...I would love to hear your tips/resources to help me get this going in my class this year. I have done quite a bit of googling and watching youtube videos on the topic... but I need as much help as I can get... thanks in advance!
     
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  3. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jul 19, 2012

    Debbie Diller is a great resource-she even has some tips on her blog:

    http://debbiediller.wordpress.com/

    For reading I really like: http://www.fcrr.org/

    You can just print activities for phonics or fluency, laminate and go.

    The main thing you have to remember is to model for the kids often what the expectations are before you put a station out. As long as you are consistent in setting those routines-it will be successful! :thumb:
     
  4. Lotte

    Lotte Companion

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    Jul 19, 2012

    Check out the Daily 5 :thumb:

    Super book tht explains a system that works. It even tells you exactly how to get the kids to be independent so you can pull groups out at the same time :)
     
  5. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jul 19, 2012

    1) Group the kids: I use DIBELS and STAR assessments to put kids into groups. There is debate about whether to group homogeneously or not. We are required to group students according to ability. I try to keep groups small (rarely have more than 6 kids per group.)

    2) Once you've grouped the kids, you'll be able to plan how long you'd like each group to last and how many groups you'll have. I generally end up with 5 groups and have each station last 10 minutes.

    3) When you know how many groups you'll have, decide what kinds of stations you'd like to use. I count GROUP as one station (the kids are with me at the reading table). I count COMPUTERS as another station. Then, I have Writing, Reading, and Spelling stations. You can decide each day/week what to have the kids do during the stations.

    4) Make a schedule. I make a chart with six columns and five rows. Down the first column, I skip the top slot and then list the five groups (I call them A, B, C, D, and E, but you can name them if you'd like). Then, I write the five stations in the second column: Group, Computers, Reading, Writing, Spelling. Then I move to the next column and write them again, but I start in the second square...and so on until I have scheduled each group at a different station each time. Hope that makes sense!

    5) Provide the kids with an easily accessible schedule to keep handy or post a large master schedule in easy view. Explain expectations for stations to the kids. Don't forget to tell them what to do if they need help or need to go to the bathroom. Practice switching stations. A lot. =) Make sure kids know who is in their group so they can figure out where to go if they're not sure. Set a timer for each station so that you can let the kids know when to switch!


    6) Find resources online to help plan what to do during stations!
     

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