How difficult will it be for a contracted teacher to find a new school?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by LittleShakespeare, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. LittleShakespeare

    LittleShakespeare Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2017

    I'm a bit curious about something.

    I recently got a contracted position at a new high school. I am having a good time so far, but I am curious about something: if I ever wanted to leave this position, would it be difficult for a new district to hire me?

    Please forgive me, I want you all to know something. I had a terrific day at school today. I rapped Shakespeare with my kids and we had a fun assignment. I don't hate this school in any way. I am honored to be working for them. But to be honest, I want more.

    I want to work with kids that actually want to be in school. I have 75 students, and according to a survey, only 5% of them want to go to college. A few others have claimed that "dropping out" is the way to go. I get that this is my job and I have to inspire them to achieve above and beyond, but I don't know if this school is the right fit for me.

    I'm working with kids from low-income families. Many of my kids are not US citizens, and this school is more like an inner-city school. I have some really lazy freshmen. I had one who got written up today for plagiarism; he copied and pasted a graduate school essay from JSTOR. :O

    I want to challenge the kids, but the resource teacher I am working with is very sulky when it comes to challenge. Creativity is simply not allowed, and that I can understand, but it's not working. 75% of the kids in the resource classroom are failing.

    Not only that, but we don't have enough classrooms, so we have to share. I am sharing a classroom with this special education teacher. May God forgive me, but she is driving me crazy. She gossips like crazy about our boss, the principal, and she tells me about who's sleeping with who, why she hates everyone, etc. I have an 80 minute prep, and I'm thinking of leaving the classroom for prep because I can't get any work done with her there. All she does is nag, nag, nag about how much she hates her job. It's driving me crazy.

    Like I said, I love these kids and I don't mind the school, but in case I want to leave at the end of the school year, how difficult would that be? Thanks in advance, everybody. :)
     
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  3. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Oct 23, 2017

    It will really depend on your references.
     
  4. LittleShakespeare

    LittleShakespeare Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2017

    Just FYI, I won't leave mid-school year. That's just awful. I would probably resign when my ten-month contract is over. I'm just curious.
     
  5. LittleShakespeare

    LittleShakespeare Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2017

    Hey there. Like letters of recommendation?
     
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    It’ll depend on your area. Here, they email or call your immediate supervisor. I’ve only heard of lors used often on this site. It’s not been my personal experience.
     
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  7. LittleShakespeare

    LittleShakespeare Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2017

    I understand. I won't ever want to burn any bridges. I actually love the principal at my school, and I am happy working with such a supportive group of English teachers.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2017
  8. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Oct 24, 2017

    First off, I would advise against resigning unless you actually have another job. If you are fine there, stay until you have something new. As far as districts hiring people who had had contracts elsewhere, around here it happens all the time. In fact, some districts prefer that you have 3-5 years teaching experience and will even state this preference in their job postings. I started in my current district with 6 years experience in a different district.

    The one tricky part about leaving when you're under a contract is giving notice. In PA for example you need to give 60 days notice and then it's up to the district if they'll hold you for those 60 days or not. So, that's the one tricky part with getting a new job while under contract - the new district needs to be okay to wait for you to stop working for the other district. But since all of the public schools follow this policy, most districts are fine holding the position for you until your other district releases you. Unless the teacher is coming from a private or charter school, the new district knows there's the possibility of not getting the person for 60 days. A former coworker of mine got her job offer around Aug 15th and started off the school year in the district she had been working in and then finally in mid October she was able to go to her new job. She wasn't released before the 60 days because no replacement was found in that time. But the other place held the job for her so it worked out fine. A pain to have to wait to start, but not a big deal.
     
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  9. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Oct 24, 2017

    To answer your question - it wouldn’t be a black mark to resign at the end of the year and change districts. It happens all the time and as long as you have good references and don’t burn bridges, you’d be fine.

    However. Reading your post gives me the impression that you’re looking for this ideal, romanticized idea of a school that may not actually exist, and it may be helpful to check how realistic it really is. If it’s not realistic, you will be discontent in any school no matter how amazing the school is. It’s great that you’re passionate about your subject; that passion will be contagious to your students. But there will be motivated and unmotivated students in any subject at any school in any grade. That’s just life. Make it as engaging as you can for as many students as you can, but don’t jump from school to school looking for an academic Eden that likely doesn’t exist the way you imagine it.
     
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  10. LittleShakespeare

    LittleShakespeare Comrade

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    Oct 25, 2017

    You probably misunderstood. Of course every school has children that aren't engaged, and I'm not exactly looking for an academic "Eden" as you say. Everyone has a fit, and this school might not fit me well, and that's totally okay. I can adapt. Don't automatically jump to conclusions.
     
  11. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Oct 25, 2017

    If you have a 10 month contract, at the end of your 10 months, you no longer have a contract unless you have been offered another contract.

    Near the end of each year, we have to submit an intent form letting them know if we want to return or not. We can also indicate if we want to change schools or levels or subjects.
     
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  12. LittleShakespeare

    LittleShakespeare Comrade

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    Oct 25, 2017

    Thank you for actually answering my question and not giving me a philosophical lesson. :)
     
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  13. Zizka

    Zizka New Member

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    Oct 30, 2017

    @LittleShakespeare:

    This is a bit off-topic but I'd like to pitch in something about miss-m's comment. Judging from this:

    "Thank you for actually answering my question and not giving me a philosophical lesson"

    I'm guessing you didn't appreciate her input. Maybe you felt she was lecturing you or maybe you felt judged, I don't know.

    Either way, I think her point was not to have too high of expectations. I'd go as far as being satisfied as a teacher sort of implies having lower expectations. Don't get me wrong, we should do our best to bring the best out of students but focusing on little demonstrations of interest, a bit of homework done, little improvements is the best way to remain interested in the job and in the students. That's just my opinion, feel free to disregard it. I'm saying this because I've felt that bitter disappointment of dealing with demotivated students and I found that work became more bearable when I started to focus on the little things they did right. Little steps if you will towards something greater.

    You know when you said you did a rap and you liked your lesson? I'd say that's a success. Ok, it doesn't mean they'll get to college or that they'll be interested next class, but you got them motivated and interested for that period. That in of itself is a success I think. One day at a time, one lesson at a time. I personally like the way you approached literature that way. It's so creative and you managed to bring in students who probably wouldn't have paid interest otherwise. Quite a challenge!

    Someone told me something at the school I work at, students who are the hardest to love/to motivate are the students who need it the most. Your lesson brought some interest in students and who knows where that can lead them. It can be a struggle to deal with them for sure however but I try to remind myself of this when they get on my nerves.

    Anyways, I hope you find the right school for you!
     
  14. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Oct 30, 2017

    It will depend on where you live. I've been trying to get into a district closer to home. It's been five years of applying and I've had 2 interviews and didn't get either position. For one position, there are hundreds of applicants. It's hard to stand out! I can't afford to take a year and sub, so I'm staying in my district until one day when all the stars align and I get another position. I'm not unhappy in my current district, I just don't like the long commute.
     
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  15. LittleShakespeare

    LittleShakespeare Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2017

    That's fantastic advice, but I never asked for it. I asked how difficult it would be to find a new school under contract. I never asked for advice on how to manage my classroom or how to feel about a certain set of kids on a specific day. :)
     
  16. LittleShakespeare

    LittleShakespeare Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2017

    I know what you mean. I had a long commute at my first teaching job: an hour and fifteen minutes one way. I don't know how people can do it. :(
     
  17. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    Oct 30, 2017

    I think the OP is irked that they were given unsolicited advice, which is rude. However, I don’t think miss-m meant to offend, either.
     
  18. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    Oct 30, 2017

    In my first year teaching, I really didn't like the school. I was offered renewal, but declined it. I had no problem finding a job in the same state. During the interview at the second school, the principal just asked if I was offered renewal at the school, and then why I declined. It was a non-issue.

    One note: If you are offered renewal but decline, make a copy of the renewal letter (whatever form it takes) for your personal files, so you can prove that you were indeed offered renewal if asked.
     

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