How did you get your current job?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Dare2Teach, Jul 18, 2018.

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How did you get your current job?

  1. Relationship with someone at the facility

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Referral from a peer

    2 vote(s)
    10.5%
  3. Previous experience/relationship with the facility

    3 vote(s)
    15.8%
  4. Other

    14 vote(s)
    73.7%
  1. cocobean

    cocobean Companion

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    Jul 19, 2018

    After I graduated, I packed up and moved two hours away to a small desert city. I obviously had no connections, but I chose to move to an area that needed teachers. I have a wonderful principal and teach the grade I love. This will be my third year and I have no intentions of leaving. I have friends who stayed put, have connections through family/subbing/etc. and still don’t have full time teaching jobs ‍
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
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  2. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jul 19, 2018

    While I do think it is extremely possible for people to get jobs with no connections, I think it is naive to assume connections play no role in the hiring process. In some areas, not having connections makes it very difficult to obtain a position, and that’s just how it is. It took me six years to get hired in my current district because I had no connections. I’ve been in my district eight years now, and almost all new hires have some sort of “in,” whether they know the right people, graduated from the district, or subbed to get their foot in the door. I work in small town, highly desirable district with no lack of applicants each year.
     
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  3. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    Jul 19, 2018

    I'm a college administrator who hasn't taught K12 for a few years now, but I got my current job by applying and being willing to take a shot interviewing 1000 miles from home. To say I had no connections would be an understatement.
     
  4. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Jul 19, 2018

    I've had two jobs. Both were ones I got by filling out an application and then getting an interview. I knew no one in either situation. I've also seen people who have an "in" with the district get passed over for an outsider with more experience or more to offer in general.

    With my second job, I think the biggest thing that helped was that I had experience in what they were looking for. If I hadn't had any experience, I don't think I would've gotten the job I have now. Getting that first job was definitely the hardest.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jul 19, 2018

    I did a really good job student teaching, so when they needed to hire a 1st grade teacher, the principal told me, “I hope you’re planning to apply!” I applied, interviewed, and got the job. I put forth 150% as a student teacher and every time the principal did an informal and unannounced walkthrough, I was doing a fine job.

    Then, when I applied for my current job (assistant principal), I had already won County Teacher of the Year, so I surmise the panel knew that (my district made a big deal about it).

    My work speaks for itself. I pour my heart and soul into everything I do.
     
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  6. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jul 19, 2018

    It's interesting how we have such different experiences. My student teaching experiences couldn't have been better - I had outstanding master teachers! Even though I had no difficulty landing jobs, always put out 100% + as a teacher and my students excelled, I never received any recognition for my work in over 30 years. Good references were invaluable whenever I applied for jobs.
     
  7. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Jul 19, 2018

    I went in for an interview. Apparently one of the teachers on the team thought I was "adorable".

    I actually have nothing against networking, but I don't think it's so strong in education as in other fields.
     
  8. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    Jul 20, 2018

    I got both teaching jobs I have had with no connections. The first job I had I moved 12 hours from home, and the second job was 2 hours away. I knew no one in either location.

    I have had situations before where I thought I had an "in" and didn't get the job. I figured the job wasn't meant to be. The connections I had decided to go in a way that was better for their school at that time.

    I have been the connection for people looking for jobs, and have lost jobs to people who had connections that I did not have. I had no hard feelings about the jobs I lost and understood completely. For the most recent person who used me as a connection, I had talked to three previous coworkers who had all told me what a great teacher this guy was. I passed that onto my school, as I trusted these unofficial references and felt their words said a lot about his ability. I would hope this would carry weight with my administration, and it did.

    Connections are not always bad. Better the devil you know than the devil you don't. There are different kinds of connections that have been talked about here. I think there is a big difference between having a connection from substitute teaching or student teaching and the connection of being related to someone. If you substitute taught or student taught, you were on a several month, or several year, job interview. You were hired because administration liked the way you handled situations. Where I grew up you needed to sub to get a teaching job and I would call subbing a strategic career decision in many cases there. Also, while I feel my opinion is in the minority, sometimes that relative is the best candidate for the job and is the correct hire.
     
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  9. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    Jul 20, 2018

    I got hired by the school I student taught in. I guess it was a combination of me making a good impression and there being a vacancy. It doesn’t matter whether its relationships that get you the hook in, it’s not unethical, if you get the job on your own merit and you were the best candidate for the job. Trust me, if you got a job that you weren’t qualified for, your inadequacies will show relatively quickly, you can’t really hide it. You will either be a hamster on a wheel trying to catch up all the time (that is not fun) or you will be non renewed.
     
  10. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

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    Jul 20, 2018

    Hello, everyone.

    Thank you to all that have replied to this thread. I really appreciate it, and I have enjoyed reading your stories as to how you all got your jobs. I have been seeing a lot of different ways you all received your jobs.

    I am especially glad to hear from those who got their jobs without connections. It's good for me to know that it is possible to get a job without connections, even though having connections can have a huge impact on getting a job.

    I, myself, managed to get two interviews last year, each for a Paraprofessional position, and both in the same county school district. I got to the interview stage for both of these positions without any referrals, connections, etc. I did not get either of the positions, though.

    Fun Fact: I have a relative who works for the county school district where I applied, and she was part of the interview panel for one of the positions where I was doing an interview. I did not know about this prior to the interview. (I do not see her much, anyway.) Thankfully, I was oblivious to her being on the panel, and inadvertently kept a professional relationship with her throughout the interview.

    Even though she works for the county school district, and is related to me, it goes to show that just because you are related to, or know someone, doesn't guarantee you're going to get the job.

    Once again, a huge thanks to those of you who responded! I really appreciate it.

    - Dare2Teach
     
  11. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jul 20, 2018

    Just curious. On what basis have you reached this conclusion about networking in education in comparison to other fields?
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2018
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  12. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Jul 20, 2018

    Correct. Anecdotal experiences don’t speak to the majority at large and are not necessarily representative of a population or populations.
     
  13. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jul 20, 2018

    I find that sooooo many responses here are based on: a) ones's limited experience, b) one's own workplace or c) heresay - any one of these makes it easy to disagree. In addition, the reader has no idea what the background of the person is who posted a response which may lend credence to the comment that they have a problem with. Gut responses are also difficult to deal with, as are the one-liners. It would be nice if people would think more globally and analytically, so as not to get hung up on minutiae. Hope this makes sense and doesn't sound condescending.:)
     
  14. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Jul 20, 2018

    I'll argue that experience (personal or workplace) and what people hear are how the majority of people form opinions about everything. Participating in forums such as this are one of the way to learn how to think more globally because we can see how things can be very different in different areas.
     
  15. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 20, 2018

    I agree with this. If I was looking for evidenced-based research or something more scientific, I wouldn't come to this forum. I'd go read a scientific or educational journal. I come to this forum precisely because I want to read about others experiences - limited as they may be - and share my own.

    In a thread where the original post is specifically asking about each individual forum member's limited personal experience, I'm not sure why this is such an issue. The OP didn't ask for statistics. He asked for anecdotal experiences.

    Now, I'm not the poster who you asked, but I will share my limited and personal experience in response:

    Before becoming a teacher, I briefly worked in hospitality and tourism. My positions had titles such as "sales manager" or "account manager". Networking was a required part of the job, one that I did during work hours and one that my supervisor not only condoned but claimed was necessary in order for us to meet our workplace goals. I hated it with a passion. I'm introverted, and I just don't like to talk to people face-to-face, especially in the phony capacity that is necessary when it's for the purpose of meeting sales goals.

    That's just not how it is in education. Sure, as with anything, networking and knowing people can be positive and work in your favor. However, in education, rarely is it a part of one's daily job duties. Rarely is it necessary in order to achieve your individual workplace goals. Networking may help you get an interview. It may help you gain access to resources. It may help you learn something that you didn't already know. But, it's not usually something that you do because it's required. If networking isn't your thing, you can still work in education and be highly successful. That's not the case for other professions out there, particularly anything to do with sales. Perhaps administrators do have to occasionally engage in some forced networking, but it's quite rare that a teacher must do the same.
     
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