How did you get your current job?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Dare2Teach, Jul 18, 2018.

?

How did you get your current job?

  1. Relationship with someone at the facility

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Referral from a peer

    2 vote(s)
    10.5%
  3. Previous experience/relationship with the facility

    3 vote(s)
    15.8%
  4. Other

    14 vote(s)
    73.7%
  1. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jul 18, 2018

    Hi, everyone. This is Dare2Teach.

    I have currently been a year and a half out of college ever since I graduated back in December of 2016, and have been trying to get a job ever since. This has been really tough on me, lately, and I'm sure this is just a way of life.

    One problem I have with getting a job, though, is that I would hate to play the "relationship" card. In other words, I would hate to get a job simply because I know someone from the facility, and vice versa, especially if that person is head of the facility. I just think that this is unfair for other applicants who do not know anybody, and might be a better candidate than the one who does know someone. No offense for those of you that got your job this way.

    I am creating this thread because I thought it would be interesting to hear how some of you got your current position.

    I just want to know if you got your job by a means of knowing someone from the facility/someone knowing you, referral from a peer, previous experience/relationships with the facility, etc.

    The reason I want to know this is because I would like to try and see if I can get responses that are across the board, meaning that there were different ways you all got your current job position.

    Thank you in advance for your answers! I look forward to hearing your responses.

    - Dare2Teach
     
  2.  
  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    8,312
    Likes Received:
    1,433

    Jul 18, 2018

    I have to technically say "previous experience" because I interviewed for another position for which I was not qualified (the person who was awarded the job has since taken over as principal). Originally, I took the interview to see how my new M.Ed. in Educational Leadership would fly, but I found myself falling in love with the way this particular school functioned. I watched postings regularly and was thrilled when an ELA position opened. Coming to that second interview felt like when I first checked out the house I've now lived in for almost a decade. It was a little odd sitting across from the person who got the first job I interviewed for, but I understood why she got the position withing 90 seconds. She is my mentor now as I finish my administrative license.
     
  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,840
    Likes Received:
    586

    Jul 18, 2018

    I did not know anyone at the schools that I interviewed in this year. However, I emailed every single principal/department head for all of the schools that I applied to with my resume and cover letter. I was surprised that this principal actually replied to set up an interview -- and even apologized for replying late! Most of the principals did not reply or said the position is filled. I then went to a job fair that had about 50 districts from my state and I met the principal there, before my scheduled interview. Unless a job application says not to, I would email principals. I also called a few secretaries and inquired about the position. One of them even printed my resume and put it on the principal's desk. It didn't lead to anything but it was a nice gesture.
     
  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,467
    Likes Received:
    2,355

    Jul 18, 2018

    I sense that you believe many of us were hired because of who we knew. However, after applying at multiple schools that had openings in my certification, I simply earned the job based on knowledge, experience, and the ability to interview well, while answering their questions well. My son had a similar experience, after going out of state to take multiple interviews in a short number of days.
     
    ready2learn, pommom and bella84 like this.
  6. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,849
    Likes Received:
    716

    Jul 18, 2018

    I have held 3 different teaching positions and none of them were obtained through connections. I moved across the country from my home state in order to get a position right out of college. I didn't know anyone in this state when I moved, and I didn't know anyone working in either of the other 2 schools I've worked in either. My dad is a teacher and his principal offered to interview me "for practice" when I graduated. He stated that he couldn't hire me at his school as the district didn't allow family to work together, but if he liked me, he would recommend me to other principals in the district.

    There is still no guarantee this would have led to a position, and my dad did warn me that if the principal wasn't "very impressed" he wouldn't pass my name along. Obviously, this was still an advantage that other applicants wouldn't have had. I didn't want to take him up on the offer at all because I felt guilty about it. My parents convinced me that was stupid and that I needed to do whatever I could in the job market (in my home city, there were thousands of teachers applying to each position). I ended up getting my first teaching position before the interview with my dad's principal.

    I remember telling one of my teammates about this in a conversation about how I ended up in a state I knew no one in for my first job. I told her I wouldn't have wanted to work in my dad's district anyway, because I'd be afraid everyone would judge me for getting the job through "nepotism." My teammate looked at me like I had three heads and said, "Well, obviously they'd figure out that wasn't true as soon as you started working!" Maybe, but I'm still glad things worked out the way they did. People spend years as subs or aides to get into that district, and if I had gotten hired right away I'm sure there would resentment from some regardless of my performance.

    My current district is one of the only ones that doesn't attend any local job fairs; which is how I got most of my other interviews. I just applied online. I'd been applying for a couple of months at that time and started getting nervous about having a position, so I started interviewing in another city about 90 minutes away. When my current school called to interview, I already had an interview set up for 8 AM in the other city. I also had my 2 best friends from college visiting and I had told them we'd go down, stay in a hotel, and do some touristy stuff there.

    My current school allowed me to do a phone interview; scheduled right after my other one. I went to the 8 AM interview and knew I'd gotten the job. The P purposely introduced me to others in the building and had someone show me my classroom. Therefore, I wasn't very nervous for my phone interview. When I got back to our hotel, there were 60 mph winds outside and I couldn't hear anything, so I tried to go to the lobby and kept getting distracted by kids and loud people. I honestly had no idea how it went.

    About 2 hours later, I was up on Pike's Peak with my friends and got the call that I got the job! I initially asked for time to think about it, but ended up deciding I wanted my current position over the one in the other city, so I called the P the next day to accept. I did end up getting offered the other position too.
     
  7. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,060
    Likes Received:
    538

    Jul 18, 2018

    I got an interview at my current school because of a referral from a peer. Our job market is over saturated with unemployed teachers and each posting gets hundreds of applicants. But I believe being able to articulate my unique experiences and qualifications sealed the deal.

    ETA: I also went on an interview once because a principal called in a favour from another principal, and I did not get the job. So, just because strings are pulled for the interview doesn't mean you'll get an offer. Since then, this same principal has had multiple openings at her school, I've applied for them all and have not had a single interview.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
  8. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2015
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    417

    Jul 18, 2018

    I applied to this district, got an interview, and got an offer on the spot.
    It helps when there's a teacher shortage.

    I'm now moving onto a second school in the same district, a position I didn't even apply for.
    My last principal raved about me and my coteacher to my new Principal, so she decided she wanted both of us (my coteacher applied for a position at this school, that's why new P was talking to old P)
     
  9. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,431
    Likes Received:
    949

    Jul 18, 2018

    After graduation, I subbed in my hometown district. I ended up at the high school full time the second semester for two English teachers. One was on maternity leave. As soon as she returned, another left on medical leave. The next year I was offered a position at the school. That’s how I started in the district. As far as the school where I am now, I had taught a reading class at the school for two years because they had a huge group of kids, and they needed one more section offered to get them all in. My primary job was high school one year and home bound kids the next year, but I taught that one class at the middle school. The next year I was contacted by the middle school principal asking if I would be interested in teaching language arts for a year for a teacher who was taking a leave to teach in China for a year. I took the position, and I’ve been there ever since.
     
  10. mamaotter

    mamaotter Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2014
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    8

    Jul 18, 2018

    I did not know anyone in the district. I had a scheduled interview that went well, and after I left, the principal called two other principals in the district. One of them called me before I left town and interviewed me as well the same day. I got that job.
     
  11. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,277
    Likes Received:
    743

    Jul 18, 2018

    I filled out an application.

    I brought a photo brochure to my interview and some data on test scores in a chart.
     
  12. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,430
    Likes Received:
    1,400

    Jul 19, 2018

    I didn’t know anyone or have any connections for any of my four teaching jobs. For the current job, I applied and interviewed for a position but didn’t get it. The principal asked me to interview for a different position about a month later, and I got that one. It was my resume and cover letter that got me the first interview, and it was a combination of my performance in both interviews that got me the job. Most others who get hired at my district also have no prior experience with the district or connections of any sort. There are those who do, but they earned the job on their own merit, not because of who they knew.
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    13,830
    Likes Received:
    1,653

    Jul 19, 2018

    When I was subbing, I twice had principals recommend me for interviews--once for a long-term sub position and once for a permanent position--but I got the positions on my own merit. I didn't need to interview for my current job, as the majority of the staff at my previous school was moved because of a change of program.
     
  14. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    976
    Likes Received:
    196

    Jul 19, 2018

    I'm sorry, but I just don't understand why you see it as a negative if someone has a connection with a district. I teach in the district where my children both attended school, so naturally I had connections who knew me. I also subbed exclusively in that district for five year, so I also knew the principals and they knew me. I would expect their knowledge of me, my capabilities, and my experience to play a role in the hiring process.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  15. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2015
    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    138

    Jul 19, 2018

    I've only got one job through connections. My third position was at an relatively new school (only open 1 year), and my department head's niece was leaving her position, and a former teacher from my current school was department head at my new school. I was recommended. But, I still had to be interviewed and hired. I do believe the recommendation put me ahead of the game, but other than that, every job I got was based on my qualifications and whether I "fit" the school.
     
  16. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,467
    Likes Received:
    1,349

    Jul 19, 2018

    I have only earned one teaching job because of someone I knew in my 40+ years of teaching. My job was being eliminated due to low numbers and the P recommended me to another school. Every other job I have received was earned the old fashioned way.
     
  17. cocobean

    cocobean Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2016
    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jul 19, 2018

    After I graduated, I packed up and moved two hours away to a small desert city. I obviously had no connections, but I chose to move to an area that needed teachers. I have a wonderful principal and teach the grade I love. This will be my third year and I have no intentions of leaving. I have friends who stayed put, have connections through family/subbing/etc. and still don’t have full time teaching jobs ‍
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
    Backroads likes this.
  18. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    445

    Jul 19, 2018

    While I do think it is extremely possible for people to get jobs with no connections, I think it is naive to assume connections play no role in the hiring process. In some areas, not having connections makes it very difficult to obtain a position, and that’s just how it is. It took me six years to get hired in my current district because I had no connections. I’ve been in my district eight years now, and almost all new hires have some sort of “in,” whether they know the right people, graduated from the district, or subbed to get their foot in the door. I work in small town, highly desirable district with no lack of applicants each year.
     
    Backroads and Leaborb192 like this.
  19. greendream

    greendream Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    597
    Likes Received:
    127

    Jul 19, 2018

    I'm a college administrator who hasn't taught K12 for a few years now, but I got my current job by applying and being willing to take a shot interviewing 1000 miles from home. To say I had no connections would be an understatement.
     
  20. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    146

    Jul 19, 2018

    I've had two jobs. Both were ones I got by filling out an application and then getting an interview. I knew no one in either situation. I've also seen people who have an "in" with the district get passed over for an outsider with more experience or more to offer in general.

    With my second job, I think the biggest thing that helped was that I had experience in what they were looking for. If I hadn't had any experience, I don't think I would've gotten the job I have now. Getting that first job was definitely the hardest.
     
  21. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,225
    Likes Received:
    1,163

    Jul 19, 2018

    I did a really good job student teaching, so when they needed to hire a 1st grade teacher, the principal told me, “I hope you’re planning to apply!” I applied, interviewed, and got the job. I put forth 150% as a student teacher and every time the principal did an informal and unannounced walkthrough, I was doing a fine job.

    Then, when I applied for my current job (assistant principal), I had already won County Teacher of the Year, so I surmise the panel knew that (my district made a big deal about it).

    My work speaks for itself. I pour my heart and soul into everything I do.
     
    agdamity and bella84 like this.
  22. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    514

    Jul 19, 2018

    It's interesting how we have such different experiences. My student teaching experiences couldn't have been better - I had outstanding master teachers! Even though I had no difficulty landing jobs, always put out 100% + as a teacher and my students excelled, I never received any recognition for my work in over 30 years. Good references were invaluable whenever I applied for jobs.
     
  23. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,225
    Likes Received:
    1,576

    Jul 19, 2018

    I went in for an interview. Apparently one of the teachers on the team thought I was "adorable".

    I actually have nothing against networking, but I don't think it's so strong in education as in other fields.
     
  24. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2013
    Messages:
    321
    Likes Received:
    62

    Jul 20, 2018

    I got both teaching jobs I have had with no connections. The first job I had I moved 12 hours from home, and the second job was 2 hours away. I knew no one in either location.

    I have had situations before where I thought I had an "in" and didn't get the job. I figured the job wasn't meant to be. The connections I had decided to go in a way that was better for their school at that time.

    I have been the connection for people looking for jobs, and have lost jobs to people who had connections that I did not have. I had no hard feelings about the jobs I lost and understood completely. For the most recent person who used me as a connection, I had talked to three previous coworkers who had all told me what a great teacher this guy was. I passed that onto my school, as I trusted these unofficial references and felt their words said a lot about his ability. I would hope this would carry weight with my administration, and it did.

    Connections are not always bad. Better the devil you know than the devil you don't. There are different kinds of connections that have been talked about here. I think there is a big difference between having a connection from substitute teaching or student teaching and the connection of being related to someone. If you substitute taught or student taught, you were on a several month, or several year, job interview. You were hired because administration liked the way you handled situations. Where I grew up you needed to sub to get a teaching job and I would call subbing a strategic career decision in many cases there. Also, while I feel my opinion is in the minority, sometimes that relative is the best candidate for the job and is the correct hire.
     
    bella84 likes this.
  25. rpan

    rpan Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    637
    Likes Received:
    470

    Jul 20, 2018

    I got hired by the school I student taught in. I guess it was a combination of me making a good impression and there being a vacancy. It doesn’t matter whether its relationships that get you the hook in, it’s not unethical, if you get the job on your own merit and you were the best candidate for the job. Trust me, if you got a job that you weren’t qualified for, your inadequacies will show relatively quickly, you can’t really hide it. You will either be a hamster on a wheel trying to catch up all the time (that is not fun) or you will be non renewed.
     
  26. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jul 20, 2018

    Hello, everyone.

    Thank you to all that have replied to this thread. I really appreciate it, and I have enjoyed reading your stories as to how you all got your jobs. I have been seeing a lot of different ways you all received your jobs.

    I am especially glad to hear from those who got their jobs without connections. It's good for me to know that it is possible to get a job without connections, even though having connections can have a huge impact on getting a job.

    I, myself, managed to get two interviews last year, each for a Paraprofessional position, and both in the same county school district. I got to the interview stage for both of these positions without any referrals, connections, etc. I did not get either of the positions, though.

    Fun Fact: I have a relative who works for the county school district where I applied, and she was part of the interview panel for one of the positions where I was doing an interview. I did not know about this prior to the interview. (I do not see her much, anyway.) Thankfully, I was oblivious to her being on the panel, and inadvertently kept a professional relationship with her throughout the interview.

    Even though she works for the county school district, and is related to me, it goes to show that just because you are related to, or know someone, doesn't guarantee you're going to get the job.

    Once again, a huge thanks to those of you who responded! I really appreciate it.

    - Dare2Teach
     
  27. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    514

    Jul 20, 2018

    Just curious. On what basis have you reached this conclusion about networking in education in comparison to other fields?
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2018
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  28. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,885
    Likes Received:
    1,081

    Jul 20, 2018

    Correct. Anecdotal experiences don’t speak to the majority at large and are not necessarily representative of a population or populations.
     
  29. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    514

    Jul 20, 2018

    I find that sooooo many responses here are based on: a) ones's limited experience, b) one's own workplace or c) heresay - any one of these makes it easy to disagree. In addition, the reader has no idea what the background of the person is who posted a response which may lend credence to the comment that they have a problem with. Gut responses are also difficult to deal with, as are the one-liners. It would be nice if people would think more globally and analytically, so as not to get hung up on minutiae. Hope this makes sense and doesn't sound condescending.:)
     
  30. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,431
    Likes Received:
    949

    Jul 20, 2018

    I'll argue that experience (personal or workplace) and what people hear are how the majority of people form opinions about everything. Participating in forums such as this are one of the way to learn how to think more globally because we can see how things can be very different in different areas.
     
  31. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,430
    Likes Received:
    1,400

    Jul 20, 2018

    I agree with this. If I was looking for evidenced-based research or something more scientific, I wouldn't come to this forum. I'd go read a scientific or educational journal. I come to this forum precisely because I want to read about others experiences - limited as they may be - and share my own.

    In a thread where the original post is specifically asking about each individual forum member's limited personal experience, I'm not sure why this is such an issue. The OP didn't ask for statistics. He asked for anecdotal experiences.

    Now, I'm not the poster who you asked, but I will share my limited and personal experience in response:

    Before becoming a teacher, I briefly worked in hospitality and tourism. My positions had titles such as "sales manager" or "account manager". Networking was a required part of the job, one that I did during work hours and one that my supervisor not only condoned but claimed was necessary in order for us to meet our workplace goals. I hated it with a passion. I'm introverted, and I just don't like to talk to people face-to-face, especially in the phony capacity that is necessary when it's for the purpose of meeting sales goals.

    That's just not how it is in education. Sure, as with anything, networking and knowing people can be positive and work in your favor. However, in education, rarely is it a part of one's daily job duties. Rarely is it necessary in order to achieve your individual workplace goals. Networking may help you get an interview. It may help you gain access to resources. It may help you learn something that you didn't already know. But, it's not usually something that you do because it's required. If networking isn't your thing, you can still work in education and be highly successful. That's not the case for other professions out there, particularly anything to do with sales. Perhaps administrators do have to occasionally engage in some forced networking, but it's quite rare that a teacher must do the same.
     
    Backroads and YoungTeacherGuy like this.
  32. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2015
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    28

    Jul 20, 2018

    I've had friends personally hand my resume to their principal and heard absolutely nothing so I don't hold much stock in relationships anymore.

    The only ones I have heard of as getting an "in" are young teachers, fresh out of college. Experiences teachers and connections? Not so much.

    I applied and went to a job fair. I've had much better success from job fairs and being interviewed by principals there who then put their rating on you in the system and then I've had a good handful of principals call or email.

    Next to that, simply email principals. That got me a job twice.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  33. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,431
    Likes Received:
    949

    Jul 20, 2018

    I am getting ready to start year 26 in education, and two online forums are the closest thing I get to networking. I am still able to get my work done effectively without active networking.

    Now, my DSS is all about networking. He is an event planner. He did seasonal work at Churchill Downs during Kentucky Derby season. His full-time job is with a large, luxury hotel. He cannot effectively do his job without networking. A lot. He is very social, so a job requiring extensive networking if perfect for him. (He gave law school a try, but he seems better suited for public relations.)
     
  34. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,430
    Likes Received:
    1,400

    Jul 20, 2018

    I'm going to further respond by sharing a few things that I've learned - things that have helped to shape my global opinions on education - from hearing about other forum members' limited personal experiences and anecdotes:

    - Not all charter schools are bad. Where I live, working at a charter school is the worst. You do it to get experience on a resume, but no one wants to end up at one long-term. I've learned from this forum that some people are happy working in charter schools, and some treat their staff very well.

    - Some schools don't have "specials"! I thought every elementary school offered specials classes for students, which led to plan time for teachers. Who would have thought that they didn't?

    - I've learned that secondary teachers have "preps" and that their jobs really aren't any easier or more difficult than elementary teachers' jobs. They just deal with different challenges and stressors.

    - I've learned that some principals really do have it out for teachers and that due process is helpful and necessary for some, despite not ever needing to take advantage of it myself.

    - I've learned that some private schools actually don't pay terribly. In my area, most pay worse than public schools, except for the very elite private schools.

    I'm sure that there is more, but this is what came to my mind in the past five minutes or so. I have a broader view on education in our country as a whole. My opinions on some issues, policies, instructional strategies, philosophies, etc. have been shaped by reading about and pondering others' experiences. I'm grateful to have the opportunity to learn from so many people in so many places who I would not otherwise have an opportunity to learn from - even if what I am learning comes from their limited, anecdotal experiences.
     
    teacherintexas and MrsC like this.
  35. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,225
    Likes Received:
    1,163

    Jul 20, 2018

    I had to respectfully ask what specials were when I joined this forum! Because of my “limited and anecdotal experience” due to having only worked in one district, I had no idea what that term meant!

    I’ve also learned from my colleagues here at AtoZ that not all unions are as strong/powerful as the one in my district. Each July (next week, actually), we’ll see a chart thatll show us the number of grievances that each site received. Our superintendent tells us, “Don’t be the site with the most grievances. Grievances = headaches for the district office”
     
  36. RaiderFan87

    RaiderFan87 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2018
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    31

    Jul 20, 2018

    Generally, when one needs to end his/her post with, "Hope this makes sense and doesn't sound condescending", then it's probably condescending! Just my two cents!
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2018
  37. MaleTeacher

    MaleTeacher Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2017
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    20

    Jul 20, 2018

    I got my first job (as an classroom aide) because I graduate from that district, had a high GPA, had all of my qualifications, and was a model student throughout my educational career.
    My first attempt at student teaching was also through connections. However, that turns out horrible. Now I found a student teaching job in another part of my state, in a small village where I don't know anyone. It is more difficult in several ways but worth it.
     
  38. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,225
    Likes Received:
    1,576

    Jul 20, 2018

    I think bella said it well. Teachers on the whole simply don't network to the extent of other careers. We don't "collaborate and create jobs" (often happening in networking), at least not to any significant amount. We may have a fine array of skills, but they tend to fit the simple category of teaching said skills. Of course I'm not knocking teachers, but rarely do we run into other people to discuss jobs and opportunities and crazy growth promotions to the extent of many other careers.

    Sure, we might know people to gain interviews and whatnot, but that's not what networking has become.
     
  39. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1,172

    Jul 20, 2018

    Other. In the district I was subbing in, I actually had a ton of contacts, relationships, and positive feedback -- one of the more asked-for subs despite not really advertising myself much. I had applied there several times, never got a position. Over the summers and school years I kept applying places nearby, slowly branching out further.

    Eventually, 4 years ago, I put in an application to a school district pretty far out in my state. Got a call Monday about an interview Wednesday, went to do the interview (no joke: the song, "Best Day of my Life" played as I pulled in, exactly on time, after having taken a wrong turn onto the wrong direction on the freeway), then got a call Friday asking if I wanted the position.

    Given that the teacher days started on Monday, I had to literally pack and prepare that weekend...and was pretty much crying 75% of the time (not good with change, and it was going to mean that my wife and I would have to live in separate places for at least a month or two). Moved down...after managing to break the side-view mirror on my car and having to duct-tape that before driving down...and the rest is history.

    I've heard a rumor that I was actually a second choice to one of my colleague's friends who turned it down...not sure how true that is, but at this point, no use in looking back. While I was initially told by my university supervisor during student teaching that I might want to do something different (my belated mentor teacher believed the world in me), and didn't get hired for a while...and still struggle with confidence... the relationships I've developed and positive accolades from parents/kids have changed my beliefs in myself as a teacher. Most important move ever. (And now I'm having to decide whether or not to move to a different district because of housing costs here...ugh!)
     
    bella84 and Backroads like this.
  40. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,225
    Likes Received:
    1,576

    Jul 20, 2018

    I will say this for connections, though. I think I have mentioned during my job hunt that I found out I was going to be interviewing with a principal who was a friend, Sunday School teacher, neighbor, etc., growing up. I didn't get the job at her school, but she did insist I make her a reference.
     
    bella84 likes this.
  41. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2015
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    417

    Jul 20, 2018

    I think it depends on the district.
    My friend works for a district where you NEED a connection. Top rated schools, hundreds of applicants, very few positions open.
    My district is short on teachers so they'll take anyone who is sane and certified! Most positions are filled by substitutes
     
    Backroads and YoungTeacherGuy like this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. RainStorm,
  2. Melrachelm,
  3. Preschool0929,
  4. Linguist92021,
  5. miss-m,
  6. Kelster95
Total: 479 (members: 7, guests: 446, robots: 26)
test