How can they support me?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by MissH225, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. MissH225

    MissH225 Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2010

    Today I had an evaluation conference and well it wasn't so good. Long story short I want to do well and my principal sees that but we are falling short in the area of classroom management. There are improvements but not enough. She says she commends me for coming in, sticking with it and being open to help/ideas but she can tell my "heart is damaged". I want to be good and help my kids but we are falling short.

    After that I was really tough on my kids and it was better, I felt in control. But anyway I am in the 3rd grade hall away from my team. But the 3rd grade teachers asked me to come by and really want to help me.

    How can they do that? What can my principal do?Any strategies. I think the 3rd grade rooms are going to be my buddy room and I'm not going to tolerate anything. You get a warning, an in class time out, then you are out to a buddy room. Then if there's another problem when you return it's detention! Thoughts?
     
  2.  
  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2010

    Having a buddy room is a great idea! Can any of the third grade teachers observe in your classroom and provide you feedback.

    It seems that you need to get a behavioral system in place (stop light, colors, etc...something). Maybe they can give you suggestions.
     
  4. MissH225

    MissH225 Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2010

    I have a stoplight system. I also have stars for indiv. good behavior and also table points for table groups. The whole class also has a marble jar.
     
  5. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,150
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2010

    I completely agree with Mopar. With the younger kids, visual behavioral systems work wonders. I personally swear my the clothes pins on a colored chart which the kids move based on their behavior.

    Also, I send home a monthly calendar which I color in at the end of teh day based on how well the student behaved. If a child had a rough morning, but improved in the p,m, then I split the box in half and color the top red and the bottom green.

    Plus, I do incentives. I give out stickers, high fives and sometimes when I can tell my kids are having a rough day(ie: right before a big holiday or right after), I give out little treats for lunch time if everyone follows directions.

    My kids especially love the class treasure box. They each have a chart on their desk. Anyone who has all the boxes filled in by the end of the month gets to choose something out the chest.

    Throughout the month I give signatures, especially when i see a child following directions and the others aren't. that encourages the others
     
  6. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 30, 2010

    This is JUST an idea. One teacher has a clothes pin for each of her kiddos. If they do something wonderful, or are doing much better today then they were yesterday, then she clips their clothespin on her shirt. At the end of the day, I believe, they get a small reward. Seeing their clothespin on her shirt seems to be a great motivator for this class.
     
  7. KateL

    KateL Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    810
    Likes Received:
    2

    Nov 30, 2010

    Can the principal give you any release time to observe other teachers? An hour here and there can give you lots of ideas to try in your own classroom. Also, is the principal or someone else willing to come and teach a lesson in your classroom? Seeing someone handle your own students can be incredibly enlightening.
     
  8. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,233
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2010

    Sometimes it's in the voice you use. You may need to develop that strong leader voice. I definitely don't mean harsh or mean or yelling. It's an "I am the one in charge" voice.

    It can be done by practicing a few things:
    1. Don't tack a question onto the end of your statements.
    "You need to take out your books. OK?"
    2. Go quieter instead of louder. If they aren't listening, talk in a
    voice that is quiet and slow and a bit imposing.
    3. Put your "please" at the end of the command. Instead of
    "Please sit down." which sounds a bit like begging, you say,
    "Sit down.....(pause) please." Make sure that end "please"
    doesn't come out as a question.
    4. Utter silence on your part can be golden. Practice the icy
    stare. This is not a frown or a glare. It's a non-smiling laser
    beam look. You can practice this at home. Imagine being able
    to freeze something in place with just a steady look, and
    then the release a few moments later.
    5. Add laughter often. Strange, but students who enjoy being
    in your class will quickly learn what it takes to put you in a
    happy mood. So show them that there is a world of
    controlled enjoyment.

    I have no idea if this will help. Yes, you need a behavior system. Just remember that going harsh sometimes creates the wrong atmosphere.

    I've been teaching many years. I still remember the day during my second year that I felt so overwhelmed with discipline and motivation problems that I finally decided I was tired of being upset. I put a huge yellow smiley face on the back wall where I could see it all the time. It worked. (Perhaps because I would get very silent and look at it and then slowly smile. Maybe the kids were freaked out by my behavior?)
     
  9. wrice

    wrice Habitué

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2009
    Messages:
    758
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 30, 2010

    Any specific concerns they can help you address? Is the class too loud during transitions, or takes too long to settle? Any problem students they can observe then give you hints how best to effectively reach those challenging kids?

    I think it best to set little goals and work toward nailing them- "This week the kids will walk quietly and in line to and from lunch... For the next three days, Sammy and Susie will not blurt out but will raise their hands and wait their turn...." And if you formalize it, you'll have documentation of your continued efforts and improvement.
     
  10. mkate

    mkate Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 1, 2010

    I like the setting goals idea. I am also struggling with management with one of my classes and have tried various systems and charts etc. but have not had much success. I was lucky that another teacher was able to come in and help me out for a class or two here and there-- she actually taught this group two years ago (I'm a specials teacher, but I see each group for 8 sessions a week so it's a lot of time.) Anyway, watching her in action, I was able to see how someone can manage a class very effectively without any type of reward system (other than praise for good behavior.) They were like a totally different class with her. I still haven't been able to transfer that very successfully to my own teaching (probably for a number of reasons, though I'm hoping for a new beginning after the long holiday break.)

    Anyway, this is all just my long way of saying that observing other teachers is really helpful. I just wish I could do more of it! If you can, jump on the opportunity. It's great that the other teachers are willing to help you and that your P is supportive as well-- that makes a huge difference, IMO.

    Good luck!
     
  11. massteacher

    massteacher Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 1, 2010

    What types of things did you notice this teacher do that was able to manage her class effectively with praise and encouragement? We also don't have any visible behavior management system, except the children get breaks if they are talking out/being disruptive/etc.
     
  12. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2008
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 1, 2010

    Whole Brain Teaching is one option you should look into. The system is completely free, hundreds of pages of resources, and it integrates classroom management that is fun for you and for the kids. Classroom management will largely be handled by them, and becomes a game that the kids want you to play, but you can never lose. Check out the link. Ask me for more help if you have questions, I am a trainer for the method.
     
  13. mkate

    mkate Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 2, 2010

    Well, this might not work for your situation, because these kids are 5 (the youngest ones turn 5 at the end of December) and they sit on a rug for this session. But, she wouldn't start until everyone was ready, praising the ones who were sitting quietly and correctly and reprimanding the ones who weren't, and she would continually monitor. (Of course, when I do this, the whole class would go by and they wouldn't be paying enough attention for me to be able to start-- I actually tried this once.)

    Really, though, it wasn't so much about what she did, it was more her whole presence and demeanor. For one thing, she is very dynamic and expressive and has a loud voice, and she was really hamming it up so they were having a lot of fun. That's great, but she teaches third grade so it was fun for her to come back down and do that kind of thing one or two periods a week, while I can't imagine having to be constantly performing at that level for every class during the day.

    Also, and this is probably a big one, she was in my position two years ago and taught them 8 times a week as three year olds. Their classroom teacher was quite lax on discipline issues and she was the bad cop who got them to behave, so they probably also have that association of her as meaning business.

    I'm sorry, that probably doesn't help you at all! I wish I could isolate specific techniques she used, but again, even when I try the same techniques it doesn't work for me, so I think most of her secret comes from the relationship she built up with them and from her presence (and also I imagine there is a novelty factor at work-- if she took over my position full time again I bet she'd have it harder!)

    In any case, I think I will probably have to once again try some sort of reward/consequences system, though I'm hoping that maybe I would then be able to wean them off it. I have heard good things about Power Teaching as well, though I don't know how well it would work for my particular situation. Maybe I'll look into it again, too!
     
  14. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Dec 3, 2010

    Just making some suggestions off the top of my head here:

    I would ask for several people to come in and observe. I'd ask them to observe behavior management only, not lesson planning. And then I'd make a chart or a list of things that I wanted them to observe. With each person/each time observing a separate item.

    For example, it would be interesting to know how many times you did not notice the kid in the back of the room throwing paper at his friend. So you could ask a peer to monitor off task behaviors that you do not address.

    Things I would put on my list:

    how many times students interrupted while I was talking
    how often students got out of their seats
    how long it took for me to address students when they raise their hand
    how many times I had to call down the same students
    how many times I said one thing but did not follow through


    Also, I would love for someone to take note of my body language and intonation. Did I seem weak or unsure of myself?
     
  15. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,873
    Likes Received:
    229

    Dec 4, 2010

    Likewise (continuing from NCScience's post), perhaps you can observe one or two teachers who are notoriously great at behavior management and try to get some good ideas from that.
     
  16. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 5, 2010

    I'm just going to put this out there, based off my group of kids... they would be overwhelmed keeping track of all these different systems. They are all great tools, but might be too much for a group of seven year olds! Maybe start over with just one of these systems (personally I would do the individual one). I really like the clip chart system. Instead of the table getting a point, you could have the whole table move their individual clips up. That way you can focus on table/whole group behavior, but they are individually rewarded. It would probably be much simpler for you to keep track of too.

    I buddy with teachers next door to me. Each teacher has their private area for visitors where that child will not be distracting or disruptive to their classroom. I also sometimes send kids over to the preschool room when they are crying or having a temper tantrum. After a little bit of time in there, they decide that they are bored and want to start acting like big kids again.

    Buddying is great.... in all honesty, there are some times where you and that student need a break from each other. These other teachers might also be great "mentors" for any really tough children. We use a check-in/check-out program for some of the kids that have behavior problems (or some that struggle with their self esteem). They check in with a teacher in the morning, and that teacher gives them a little pep talk about how great their day is going to be. At the end of the day they also visit that teacher to let them know how they did. Sometimes they will give them a treat for a great day, a lunch bunch with them, a hug, a note, etc. Those kids need those small celebrations for doing well.

    I also have another great 2nd grade teacher who allows one of my students to come read with her for a few minutes a day during her students' independent reading time. He looks forward to going and reading with her everyday, and he gets to spend time in her room on Friday afternoons if he has had good behavior for the week. It's really improving his reading too, because he wants to practice his stories before he goes and reads them to her. Though it may not work for every teacher, she is very flexible in letting him come in and out of her room.
     
  17. Momma C

    Momma C Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2010
    Messages:
    269
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 5, 2010

    :yeahthat:
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 432 (members: 1, guests: 410, robots: 21)
test