How awful is it to leave a job mid-quarter

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by We'veGotDodgesonHere, Oct 25, 2016.

  1. We'veGotDodgesonHere

    We'veGotDodgesonHere New Member

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    Oct 25, 2016

    I'm a 7th/8th grade ELA teacher at a title I school. It's my first year teaching, I was hired last-second, and things have been chaotic ever since. I'm having severe classroom management issues. The students talk/shout/throw things/wander around the room non-stop, to the point where the quiet ones just put their heads down because they know we're not going to get anywhere with the lesson. They laugh or get angry when I "dare" tell them to stop talking while I'm talking. I've built friendly relationships with many of them, but it doesn't seem to change their behavior. (Though I guess laughing and saying sorry before going right back to what they were doing is an improvement over insulting me to my face.) I'm not certified to be a reading instructor, but I'm dealing with kids who read at a 3rd-4th grade level. Between my sloppy pacing and lack of control over the class, I worry I'm doing more harm than good. I'm up late every night planning lessons that are never good enough to hold their attention. I wake up nauseous with dread every morning, I'm breaking out in anxious hives, and I keep nodding off during the 45 minute drive home. The administration is very supportive, and I'm friendly with the other teachers, but I'm exhausted and moody and half-worried this job might literally kill me.

    And then last week, I got a call from my mentor teacher of last year, and the A+ school where I did my internship wants to know if I'd be willing to take a position there. I almost declined, but after three different people (non-teachers...) told me I was insane to even think about passing it up, I set up an interview. It shaves 20 minutes off my drive, starts an hour later, I'd be right across the hall from my mentor teacher, I'm only teaching one grade level, and the ELA department plans lessons as a team, whereas right now I'm floundering to do it all alone. It's a dream position, but I feel like a complete traitor to my current school and students. I don't know how to break the news to everyone if I go. I'll be the third teacher I know of to quit this year. How badly does it reflect on a new teacher who quits 3 months in to find a "better" school/students? How screwed would my kids be, having to deal with a new LA teacher in the second quarter of school when they're already so far behind? I feel sick thinking about leaving and staying.
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Oct 25, 2016

    Can you get out of your contract? I would check on that before going farther in the process.
     
  4. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Oct 25, 2016

    It would suck for them, but if it's not an issue for school B and there's no ramifications other than you couldn't list school A on your resume or reference list, go for it. A new (more experienced) teacher MAY come in with more management, lay down the law and whip them into shape... so who knows?
     
    MsAbeja and We'veGotDodgesonHere like this.
  5. We'veGotDodgesonHere

    We'veGotDodgesonHere New Member

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    Oct 25, 2016

    I'm not 100% sure, but the ELA department head at school B seems to think it wouldn't be an issue. Although the schools are in different districts. Would I have to call the school A district and ask to make sure? I hate to call and let them know I'm planning to leave before anything is set in stone.
     
  6. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    You should be able to look up the answer for your district online in your policy manual.
     
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  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Oct 25, 2016

    If you leave in the middle of the quarter, and stay working at your new job at least a couple of years, this will not be an issue. If you end up leaving the new job mid year, or get non-renewed at the end of the year, then you'd have a problem, because you had 2 jobs within one year.

    Check your contract and see if you can get out
    Don't leave until you have a set in stone decision from the other school.
    As far as the kids, they'll be fine. They seem fine, having fun making their 3rd teacher quitting, I doubt they'd be heartbroken, so please don't base your decision on them.
     
  8. We'veGotDodgesonHere

    We'veGotDodgesonHere New Member

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    Oct 27, 2016

    Hi everyone, thanks so much for the replies. I checked the district policy, and as a first year employee, my contract is probationary, and I can resign without breaching it. I formally accepted the job yesterday (yay!!), and plan to tell my principal tomorrow (yikes). He mentioned to me today that he was planning on placing a sub in my room to help with all the discipline issues... I'm hoping he/she might turn into the long-term sub and ease the transition.

    Now I guess the question is, should I admit I'm leaving to take another position?? Everyone I've asked has a different opinion. I've heard everything from "Tell him about the new position" to "Don't give a reason and say it's personal" to "Tell him the school hasn't effectively assisted with the discipline problems." :confused:
     
  9. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Nov 1, 2016

    I would tell the principal that you took a new position closer to home.
     
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  10. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

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    Nov 1, 2016

    I just accepted a new position in a different district and while it sounds like it's partly for the same reasons as you - very difficult school, challenging learning environment (and while I will admit that it's partly me struggling, it's partly the whole building struggling) - it's also a different grade level and a special ed instead of gen ed, something I really, really wanted. My principal did ask what my rationale was for resigning and I just told her the new position was a better fit for me. I did have to complete an exit survey and did talk more there about the building not having enough support staff for our level of emotional/behavioral need, but with the principal, I kept it pretty simple. I'd agree that "closer to home" is also a perfectly fine (and true) explanation.
     

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