How are teachers paid?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by gabbyraja, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. gabbyraja

    gabbyraja Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 3, 2010

    I am a prospective teacher. I hope to enter the field in 2-3 years. Thing is, I know nothing about how teachers are compensated. I don't really mean how much they make. Everyone knows teachers don't make much.

    First, I have no knowledge of unions or how it works to be a part of one. I've been reading some things here and they've sparked questions:

    *Does the union negotiate every year what the pay and benefits for teachers will be in each district? At each school?
    *What are typical things teachers get besides base pay? Such as benefits and what kind, bonuses, etc.
    *What are steps?
    *What is it like to work under contract, does every teacher have a contract, and what does a contract entail?
    *Are you paid only for the time you are in the classroom, or are you paid a paycheck all year long?

    And anything else I don't even know enough to ask...

    Thanks
    Jessica
     
  2.  
  3. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 3, 2010

    Hope this helps
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jul 3, 2010

    I teach in a non-union Catholic High school in NY.

    We get paid twice a month, on the 1st and the 15th, all year long. We sign a contract for an annual salary, and it's broken into 24 pay periods. Even if I were to quit today, I would still be paid through the end of August for last year's work.

    Here's how steps work: It's actually a grid. Going down from the top left hand corner are the numbers of years you've taught: 1,2,3... Going across the top are your degrees/ graduate credits. So think BA, BA+ 15, BA+30, and so on.

    The amounts on the scale increase from top to bottom and left to right. The smallest salary is no experience, BA.

    As you gain experience and more graduate credits, your salary increases.

    As to benefits, to be honest, I forget exactly what my school does. ( I'm covered under my husband's school policy) We get medical, dental (no orthodonture, darn it :) ) , and prescriptions.

    We also have a 401K plan.

    There's more, but I'll let someone else who is less tired fill you in.
     
  5. gabbyraja

    gabbyraja Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 3, 2010

    Ok, steps make a little more sense now. In the "corporate world" we got a standard 3% raise, assuming we met the minimum performance qualifications. More if we had an outstanding review.

    So, steps are like the standard cost living, and "raises" are extra? And, what's a standard step look like? Like 1% or like 3% etc?
     
  6. luckyal29

    luckyal29 Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 3, 2010

    I suggest looking at a school district website in the area you are considering teaching in. Many school districts post their pay scale. Very easy to see all the steps laid out

    From my experience, there is no pay bonus/raise for outstanding reviews. Your movement is based on the steps and through years of employment. Getting more units/Masters/Admin Cred can move you higher.
     
  7. Windy City

    Windy City Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 3, 2010

    *Does the union negotiate every year what the pay and benefits for teachers will be in each district? At each school?
    The union negotiates for a contract length (usually 3-5 years), and then they renegotiate when the contract is done.

    *What are typical things teachers get besides base pay? Such as benefits and what kind, bonuses, etc.
    This totally depends on the district and is all negotiated by the union. For example, we don't pay a dime for single coverage medical and dental, but in two districts away, a teacher might pay $100 per month. We don't get bonuses (admins do, though). You can get stipends for doing extra duties (before/after school, lunch, sports, clubs)... this is also negotiated by the union. Some unions aren't strong enough to keep teachers from working lunch duty without pay, but ours is incredibly strong and if a teacher must do an extra duty beyond contracted hours, there is an hourly stipend.


    *What are steps?
    Your ticket to riches! For every year of service, you get a percentage raise (typically 2-4%). The more education you get, you move over to the right of the scale in addition to your year of service raise. For example, somebody in their first year of teaching with only a Bachelor's degree will make $41,000. The next year, that teacher with a B.A. starts the year with an additional 15 graduate credits. Instead of making only the service jump ($41,500), they will make the service AND education jump ($44,500). You would be crazy to not max out yourself on that scale as fast as you can because then you are making that extra money every single year. When you get a job, find out what the max out amount is (usually Master's plus 30, 45, or 60 credits), and figure out a way to get there as soon as possible.

    *What is it like to work under contract, does every teacher have a contract, and what does a contract entail?
    Every teacher has a contract. The contract states your pay, benefits, working conditions, hours, etc... Basically, you agree to abide by the contract and the district agrees to let you work according to the contract.

    *Are you paid only for the time you are in the classroom, or are you paid a paycheck all year long?
    You are technically only paid for your work (usually 10 months). Every place that I have worked lets you either get paid for those 10 months or spread it out over 12. So if you have it spread out over 10 months, your checks will be more, but you won't get paid at all in July and August. If you choose the 12 month option, your checks will be smaller because it's spreading your salary over the months that you aren't working.
     
  8. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,256
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jul 3, 2010

    *Does the union negotiate every year what the pay and benefits for teachers will be in each district? At each school? Usually but I don't have experience in this because my state is a non-union state.

    *What are typical things teachers get besides base pay? Such as benefits and what kind, bonuses, etc. In Arizona we have Prop 301 money in which part of it is given to us throughout the year and we also receive a "chunk" in Dec. and June around $1700. My school used to be a Professional Development School which meant we would have weekly visitors to help train other teachers. We used to receive $2000 in Dec. and June but because of the budget, we have lost that money. Our insurance is paid by the district 100% and they match our retirement and Social Security deduction taken out of our paycheck.

    *What are steps? At my district we only move ---> this way based on how many extra college credits we have after graduating...that is GRADUATE credits. We do not move V down based on years of experience.

    *What is it like to work under contract, does every teacher have a contract, and what does a contract entail? Depends on the district. My contract is very vague. It doesn't even tell us what hours we work. Only the start and end date.

    *Are you paid only for the time you are in the classroom, or are you paid a paycheck all year long? You can opt to receive your paycheck year round or only through the school year. I chose year round so I get a "chunk" at the end of June which is the remainder of my paychecks for the year (about 4) We get paid every 2 weeks regardless. Other districts may only pay you once a month. Just depends.
     
  9. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    733
    Likes Received:
    1
  10. gabbyraja

    gabbyraja Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 4, 2010

    I posted a reply last night, with quotes and links and it said it had to be "approved my a moderator"... Still nothing, and I don't have the time to rewrite it. So, stay tuned for my good news I found!
     
  11. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 4, 2010

    I think you have to have a certain number of posts before you can post links so your post might not show up for awhile
     
  12. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    2,305
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 4, 2010

    Thanks Alice! I asked this question on another thread.
    I work in a small private school, so I wonder how this would work with teachers who are not degreed?? We have a curriculumn to follow, but it sure makes sense and is a wonderful incentive for thos who do not have their certification.
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Jul 4, 2010

    :thumb:
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Jul 4, 2010

    No, steps are not COLA necessarily, they are negotiated pay raises. On each step there are several 'pay points' as Alice described based on your education...So I'm on Step 11 in my district, with a Masters plus 60 additional credits so I'm making the most money I can at my step...
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jul 4, 2010

    I honestly don't think we have any non-certified teachers on staff. We certainly don't have any who don't have at least that BA.

    What do you mean by "not degreed"??
     
  16. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,256
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jul 4, 2010

    I believe it is a nationwide law that all teachers MUST be highly qualified meaning a teaching degree no matter if you are in a public or private school.....
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jul 5, 2010

    You're mistaken there.

    Private schools have the right to set their own standards. I'm sure there are limits there, but you do not have to be certified to teach in a private school.

    "All 50 States and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed. Licensure is not required for teachers in most private schools." from http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos318.htm

    That said, I know of no private schools who would let someone teach without at least a Bachelor's Degree, with or without state certification.
     
  18. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Messages:
    7,507
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jul 5, 2010

    I teach in the same state as czacza, so some of our answers may be similar :) Each district may be different in terms of how the contract is laid out, etc.

    *Does the union negotiate every year what the pay and benefits for teachers will be in each district? At each school?

    Our contracts are generally 3 years long. Once we are in the final year of our contract, we begin renegotiating with the school board for the next contract. The contract covers all teachers and anyone else in our union (school psychologists, dean of students, etc are in our union...admin and support staff have their own unions).

    *What are typical things teachers get besides base pay? Such as benefits and what kind, bonuses, etc.

    We currently have our benefits paid for, but we will start contributing to them in 2 years as per the governor's new law. My district doesn't do any bonuses, but if you earn a stipend for something, that goes into your paycheck too.

    *What are steps?

    I don't think I could explain it much better than the others already have. All I can add is an example for me: I'm currently moving onto step 8, column 3 in my district...I'm going into my 8th year of teaching and have a master's degree. So for me, step 8 is my experience and column 3 represents my degree (for us, column 1 is Bachelors, column 2 is B +30 credits, column 3 is masters, column 4 is masters +30 credits, and column 5 is doctorate).

    *What is it like to work under contract, does every teacher have a contract, and what does a contract entail?

    Everyone in my district works under a contract, even if you are a leave replacement sub. Our contract states our hours, expected duties, and lots of info on health benefits, grievance procedures, schedule B stipends (our club and activity stipends), our salary guides, and other info.

    *Are you paid only for the time you are in the classroom, or are you paid a paycheck all year long?

    Our district only pays 10 month employees for 10 months. We do not have the option like others do to have our checks spread out. However, many people I know have money taken out of their checks for the credit union and they receive money in the summer from there.


    Hope that helps! :)
     
  19. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    2,305
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 5, 2010

    A few of our teachers do not have a teaching certificate, and follow the school curriculumn

    yes, I work in a private school with their own standards and our school does have a few teachers wtihout a Bachelor's degree.
     
  20. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    2,305
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 5, 2010

    Thank you Leighball!

     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. 1xbet Registration,
  2. North Fork,
  3. Pikachu
Total: 230 (members: 3, guests: 209, robots: 18)
test