How are students selected for tutoring?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Mrs. Mom, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. Mrs. Mom

    Mrs. Mom Cohort

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    I am curious how other schools select students for after school tutoring programs (a program funded by the school, NOT paid by parents).

    1. Do you tutor students who already qualify and receive spec. ed. services during the day?
    2. Or do you try to work with those who probably should qualify but didn't?
    3. Or.....
    I'd really like to focus on the really low students during the day, during small group time. AFTER school, I'd like to keep a somewhat larger group of students who, I feel, could make some great headway in the right group setting. I have a group of kids (5-6) in both reading and math who are 1/2- 3/4 year below grade level now. Of course, I could flip flop and focus more on that group during small group, BUT I really think they would do well after school. If I do it MY way, I could target a larger group of kids for after school tutoring. Otherwise, I may only be able to keep 1-2 kids due to the different skill levels of my students.

    So, please share how your tutoring students are selected! Thanks.
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Our students are selected based on their test scores. If they are deemed to be "bubble students", i.e. students close enough to passing to just need a little boost, they will be offered extra services. In general, though, even our tutoring that is federally or specially funded is available to all students. We just make more of an effort to advertise it to the bubble students.
     
  4. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    We have "help sessions" that are required for any student with a grade below C- on a progress report, but are open to any other students. I have requested that other students who were struggling attend. If I have a student attend repeatedly who I think does not need to come, I would talk with the parents (but that's never happened).
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    We dont have such a program. We have in school basic skills instruction for strugglers, but nothing free after school offered by the district. Some teachers offer free extra help before or after school hours in school.
    I do a lot of private tutoring for many student needs: struggles, homework help, enrichment, test prep.
     
  6. missalli

    missalli Companion

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    Well, the district and the state (i.e. taxpayers) fund a program in my district for low SES students, but our ENCORE program is kind of a mismatch of students 'on the bubble', EL students, and students who have been identified as needing some kind of extra intervention, including students who are Spec Ed.
     
  7. Mrs. Mom

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    I've never heard the term "bubble students" and I'm not sure what you mean. You mean kids who are at risk to actually fail a grade level? Not kids who are scoring just below where they should be??
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I mean students who are close to passing their state proficiency tests but who haven't passed yet. For example, if the passing math score is 300, bubble students are the ones who score like 230-290 or so.
     
  9. Mrs. Mom

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    I just want my time after school to be well spent, with kids who actually WANT to be there. I am very tired of trying to work for an hour on 2 different days with kids who don't try very hard during the day, and REALLY don't try after school. I know there are low kids who will be hard workers, but the ones I'm considering haven't given me any indication of that!
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Those of you who have such programs...are you required to work them? How does the pay compare to private tutoring rates in your area?
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    At our school the teachers are paid for after-school tutoring. I think they are paid our hourly rate (which is the same rate we are paid to attend professional development stuff and that sort of thing, pretty standard in our district). It's always done on a volunteer-basis, and there are always more than a few teachers willing to do it.

    Teachers who tutor at school earn less than what they'd make if they tutored privately. The perks for doing it at school are that the hours are guaranteed and that you don't have to do any special scheduling--it's always from 2:30-4:00.
     
  12. Mrs. Mom

    Mrs. Mom Cohort

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    Ok, now I get the term bubble students! Those are the kids I am wanting to target. Since I am in third grade, these kids haven't taken the high stakes state assessment yet. I am trying to target the kids who, based on second grade Terra Nova scores, are behind but not WAY behind, so that I can get as many kids up to that level as possible. I know that all kids should get the help they need, but my butt is on the line if the largest % of my class doesn't do well!!!! Therefore, it is in the school's best interest to let me target the larger group of kids who, with after school intervention, CAN get caught up.
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    That wouldn't be comparable to private tutoring rates in my area. As it is, what our district pays for homebound instruction is about half what teachers make as private tutors.:(
     
  14. Mrs. Mom

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    So what do you all get paid for tutoring?? We don't have any private tutoring, I think that would be frowned upon. It would have to be done totally outside of school, and I am not sure the district would approve unless it was for a child who was NOT your student currently. Our school pays a whopping $10 an hour for tutoring, but we still have a district "career ladder" plan in place to reimburse teachers who have been teaching a while. It pays $2400 for 48 hours of work (I think that is the right amount). 40 of those hours must be student contact, the other 8 can be curriculum work or other school approved activities.

    Note: I wouldn't tutor for $10 an hour!!
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mrs Mom...the going rate in my area for outside of school private tutoring is $70 per hour. I tutored between 8-10 hours per week last year and have started setting up my schedule for this year. The only school regulations regarding outside tutoring ( since it is on our own, private time ) is that we don't tutor students from our district who are on our grade level.
     
  16. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    I'm jealous... In my district, we can't charge for private tutoring during the school year. And after making some nice change this summer by tutoring, it is going to be quite difficult to go back to free tutoring this school year.
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Even outside your district? On your own time?:dizzy:
     
  18. Mrs. Mom

    Mrs. Mom Cohort

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    $70 per hour???? Man, I am way underpaid.....
     
  19. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Our after school program is funded by a local charity for the most part. Parents do pay, but it's only 25 dollars a month per family, for an ulimited number of siblings. Considering the fact that it's 2 hours every day afterschool and kids get free bussing back home compared to the cost of sending the kids to daycare or a babysitter after school...that's an amazing price. Kids who are below grade level (in special ed or regular ed) are given priority for spots in the program and we heavily advertise to their families. Other kids can come after that on a first come, first serve basis. I don't believe we had to turn anyone away that wanted to come last year.

    ETA: Teachers in afterschool program get paid 26 dollars an hour. I thought that was really good. As a new teacher, it was actually slightly more than I made per hour during the day if you were to break down my salary into an hourly wage. In all honesty, most other after school activities are volunteer unless you're the head coach for a sport (and they don't get paid much), so many teachers jump at the chance to still "be involved" but get at least some compensation for it. I'm still deciding if I want to do the program this year because due to a later school day it's now running until 6 pm!
     
  20. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    At our school, when teachers have tutored students after school it was completely by their choice. They chose what days, what students, what they wanted to tutor them on, they did it because they wanted to, there is no actual program. I have tutored in the past. I have found it most effective when I had a very small number of students; between 1-3. When it was more than that, it did not seem to help much. And it is was based on what students I felt needed tutoring and could be picked up late after school.
     
  21. missalli

    missalli Companion

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    I'm with you on that. Luckily there is always a waiting list for getting into our ENCORE program (since it's not only an hour of tutoring but essentially 3+ hours of free babysitting) and the program coordinators don't seem like they put up with a lot of ****. I already know of a couple who've been kicked out for bad behavior.
     
  22. missalli

    missalli Companion

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    The rate in our district for most extra voluntary work is $40/hr, and that includes the afterschool program. (There's a couple instances when it's only about $20, and I can't quite figure out how they decide which rate applies when.) And none of that is coming from the parents, so I am perfectly happy to accept it :) If you do the program full time it comes out to an extra $450-500 a month before taxes. :thumb:
     
  23. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    The teacher selects the students for our tutoring program, based on her own discretion.
     

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