Hosting New 4th Grade Teachers/ tips?

Discussion in 'Fourth Grade' started by Gopher4, Jun 8, 2010.

  1. Gopher4

    Gopher4 Comrade

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    Jun 8, 2010

    In August, I will be hosting the new 4th grade teachers for our district. They have new teacher field trips each year and they are visiting 2 classrooms at their grade level. I am really excited to be able to share with these excited teachers as they begin their careers. I will be sharing things such as: preparing for day 1, beginning of the year plans, classroom organization/discipline tips as well as some of my favorite websites and resources. Another thing I plan on sharing is this great forum and others that allow teachers to share and receive wonderful ideas. If anyone has a great tip, resource or piece of advice for a beginning 4th grade teacher, send it my way. I have started making a list of what I would like to share, but I know I will not think of everything, so I would appreciate any responses.
     
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  3. rgreen116

    rgreen116 New Member

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    Jun 17, 2010

    If the teacher is a brand new teacher - READING/WRITING WORKSHOP HELP!!!
    Not just an overview but offer a source for them to read...

    If they are new to 4th grade but have taught before, I would discuss the importance of teaching organizational skills and the new curriculum.
     
  4. collteach

    collteach Comrade

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    Jul 18, 2010

    Tips for communicating with parents-I think most new teachers are a bit nervous about calling home, writing notes, having conferences, etc. One thing that I have learned over the years, is if I can find ways to keep parents up to date on what is going on in the classroom, I have to deal with fewer parent complaints/phone calls, etc. I set up a website, ask for email addresses, use classroom newsletters, etc.

    I think it is important for new teachers to understand that HONESTY is the best policy when communicating with parents. My first 2 years of teaching, I would sugar-coat things when talking to parents, and in the end, it made it more difficult to get the parental help I needed when it came to discipline or academic issues. They would be surprised when I contacted them and asked for help, because previously I made the mistake of acting like some things were not a big deal. I wish someone had explained to me how I could approach problems in a respectful way, while still letting parents know that the issues were important and needed attention. Does that make sense?? It seems that the parent communication part is something many people have NO experience in before setting foot in their own classroom.

    I also think it would be great to talk about collaboration with other teachers. If you and your colleagues do anything special to work together as a team, maybe you can share that. Offer your contact information in case the new teachers do not have a team that seems as receptive to helping out. Thankfully that seems to be the exception, as most teachers love to help one another, but I have worked in a school where I was a fairly new teacher with great plans and ideas working on a team with 20+ year teachers who were quite set in their ways. At times, I felt so lost because I was not sure if my ideas were good ones, since the other teachers did not want to try things out or give me feedback.
     
  5. Gopher4

    Gopher4 Comrade

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    Jul 18, 2010

    Thanks

    for all the responses. Keep them coming!
     
  6. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 23, 2010

    I would recommend Guiding Readers and Writers by Fountas and Pinnell as material to prepare for a reader's/writer's workshop. Get a LOT of pictures from veteran teachers because the new teachers can then have visuals of great classrooms. Besides that, if they are brand-new to teaching, encourage them to visit thrift stores to locate decent chapter and non-fiction books for an inexpensive cost.
     

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