Homeschooling Education- The drastic Change

Discussion in 'General Education' started by katie11, Aug 13, 2011.

  1. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    Aug 13, 2011

    I know that even before a decade "Homeschooling" wasn't that popular but in recent trend many families prefer to make their children learn from home. What do you thing as reasons behind these?
     
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  3. nikkiluvsu15

    nikkiluvsu15 Rookie

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    Aug 13, 2011

    Hmm - I'm not sure why it was for others.

    I was home schooled pretty much my whole life :D I absolutely loved being home schooled. My mom works, so the 5 of us would load up around 7:30 and get to her work. We had our own school room with desks where we did all of our school. We didn't leave for home until she was done with work (around 5-5:30). As we got older we dual-enrolled at the HS, as well as the community college.

    I graduated in May 2010 and had a graduation ceremony with 2 others. My mom is the director of a home school umbrella, which is basically recognized as a private school.

    It was also nice because my dad was a public high school teacher (oh, the irony!) and head coach for varsity football/softball. So, we would take him to work in Jacksonville (which is 1hr 10mins from our house!) and then go to the library to do all school work. After we got done we would just hang around J-ville until the game.

    For us, it is just something my parents wanted to do and I loved it :) I wasn't "sheltered" like so many people think home schoolers are, either :p:

    Don't get me wrong though, there are so many people that abuse homeschooling and it makes me mad. My parents did it the right way and still sometimes we were ridiculed.
     
  4. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

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    I was home schooled through most of my education and I absolutely hated it. I was soooo jealous of all my friends who got to ride the school bus every morning, got to have different teachers, etc etc. My mom would try to take us to "home school" activities (various sports, choir, art stuff, etc) and I found that most of the kids there had ZERO social skills. I disliked hanging out with them very much. She finally gave up on the home school activities.

    So, from personal experience, I think it *can* be done right. I think kids *can* get a good education and be successful, but more often than not, I think it leads to mis-socialized, mis-educated kids. If kids are only hanging out with other kids who also have no social skills, they aren't going to develop social skills. If kids are allowed to "choose" what they're interested in and want to learn, they're not going to learn everything they need to.
     
  5. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

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    Aug 13, 2011

    Most of the people that I know who home school do it for religious reasons, or because their child has special needs that weren't being addressed in the public schools. Most of the people with special needs children have kids with high functioning Autism spectrum disorders, and either couldn't get them qualified in the local system, or they were being bullied.
     
  6. nikkiluvsu15

    nikkiluvsu15 Rookie

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    Aug 13, 2011

    I'm confused by "kids allowed to choose what they're interested in and want to learn". We did what was required for FL to get a high school education... We definitely didn't get to pick. I'm interested if that's what you've seen other homeschoolers do that?

    Like I said, I'm afraid my parents are one of the few people who did it right. Which makes me sad.
     
  7. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Aug 13, 2011

    Around here, there are several reasons people home school their children.
    • Attendance--Their children were truant in the public school, so it was either go to court or send children to school. They choose to take them out and home school.
    • Behavior--The student was in danger of being expelled or sent to alternative placement, which the parent doesn't want.
    • Religion--We have a lot of extremely conservative religious families who do not feel that public schools are good places for their children. They object to certain theories and materials used to instruct their children. They do not like thier children being around children with certain other moral values.
    • Bad Experiences--Sometimes we get parents who have had bad experiences with school themselves, and they choose to keep their children at home. There are no private schools in our area.

    My DH was moved to a private school in middle school. He has special needs, and his mother refused to have him assessed for special education. He had a lot of trouble academically and socially. He lived in a larger town, and he was sent to a small religious school that specialized in kids with issues. Most had physical, social, or academic issues that made them not fit in with public schools very well. DH says that the school was NOT for special needs, but I've met at least 20 of his classmates, and they all have special needs . . . Autism, Tourettes, paralysis, MMD, Aspergers, etc. He had 3-5 students per class. In his class, they had 5 December graduates and 2 May graduates.

    In my town, it is really hard for parents to home school well. We are in a high-poverty area, and many of the parents lack education themselves, and we definitely lack the resources to supplement an education. Many parents mean well, but don't really understand what to do. We are 50 miles from the nearest big city as well.

    I know several people in larger towns who are great at homeschooling. Several have teaching degrees or have taken homeschooling classes so they know how to run a home school. One of my former co-workers quit to work with her own children. Her husband relocates often, and they also travel a lot. Her children have thrived with the stability of the home school environment, and they supplement with extra classes and travel. The children play sports, take music lessons, and participate in all kinds of other classes besides their main academic instruction at home. They live in a major city, so they have the opportunities.

    I have nothing against home schooling, but the sad part is that way more people do it incorrectly, and they end up with major issues.

    We sometimes get home-schooled children in our school because some parents aren't comfortable teaching more advanced materials. One family always sent their children public school in 8th grade because they wanted them to have the advanced math classes and music instruction that they couldn't provide themselves. Our high school also has a program where students can graduate in two years and attend college classes their last two years at the high school. That family had three girls who came to our school in 7th or 8th grade. They were great, smart kids who were a joy to have in class. Their son had been in public school since kindergarten. He had some special needs that she knew she couldn't address. He also had trouble separating "mom" from "teacher", so he needed the structure of traditional school. My two most pitiful cases were children (not related) who had never been to school. The girl was placed in 8th grade at age 14. She didn't even know her alphabet. She functioned pretty well socially, but had no academic background at all. She ended up marrying a 21 year old, and he signed her out of school. The other was a 12 year old boy who lived with his grandmother. He had NO social skills. He also stole and hid food. His reading ability was around first grade. He had lived his whole life in our community, but none of the kids his age knew anything other than he was "weird" and they never saw him. We were ready to report them to social services, and his grandmother pulled him out of school again.
     
  8. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Aug 13, 2011

    I was homeschooled from the 5th grade to 12th, and I hated it. I was raised a Jehovah's Witness, which I'm not anymore. School was really hard for me, I hated being different. So, it was kind of like a lesser of two evils for me - being the odd one out or being homeschooled. At the time, it seemed like being homeschooled was the best choice. Wrong.

    My mom, I love her dearly, but she didn't have the know how to teach me. She would get frustrated, I would get frustrated. It was awful. And, again, I love her dearly, but she didin't have a lot of the academic knowledge needed because it had been a while since she'd been in school. So, basically, my education ended when I was 15 or 16, and I just started working. I had to take every remedial course offered when I went to college. I really struggled at first. I mean, I didn't even know how to study for a test.

    I was very socially awkward, very. To this day it's really hard for me to make friends and to feel accepted. Like an earlier post, last week I think, asked when you felt accepted. I really just do at this point, and I'm going on my fourth year at this building. I really don't think it was the other teachers shutting me out. It was was me.

    However, there are lots of success stories. My niece's boyfriend homeschools. His parents are really strict when it comes to the courses he takes because they want him to be ready for college. They are also really strict when it comes to his day. He spends as much time "in school" as the public schools. They are a part of a homeschooling group who meet and put on plays, play sports, etc.

    I always think it's kind of ironic when a homeschooled person becomes a teacher, lol.

    Beth

    ETA: Sorry, forgot to list what I think are some reasons. I think religion; disagreements with the school's decision about an issue with their child; not agreeing with school curriculum; and uniforms, lol. Yup, that happened.
     
  9. Ms.SLS

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    Aug 13, 2011

    This was awhile ago before laws got as strict as they are now, but some kids I knew when I was growing up were allowed to choose "projects" for school. Some parents didn't believe in curriculum, and instead did a sort of project based learning system, except without the accountability. So, if the kid was interested in history, they would go to a museum and call that "school" for the day.
     
  10. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Aug 13, 2011

    My son is a senior and has been homeschooled since 4th grade. Our reasons for homeschooling were different than most people's, I guess. I considered homeschooling my oldest daughter years ago just because I had a difficult time sending her to a place where I didn't know anyone and leaving her there every day, plus I didn't have the best experiences throughout public school. I was bored and bullied, in a nutshell.

    My husband and I discussed homeschooling my daughter, but at the time a parent in our state had to have education 4 years above the grade level their child was currently in- that meant I (having 1 year of college at the time and not planning to go back any time soon) could teach her through 9th grade and would then have to put her into a public high school. We decided against it.

    Many years and two children later, our daughter got in with the wrong crowd in her freshman year of high school and exhibited some behaviors that really worried us. By this time, our state laws had changed and parents could homeschool their children all the way through school with just a high school diploma or GED, so we asked her if she wanted to be homeschooled (she said she wanted to get away from the kids she got into trouble with but knew it would be difficult going to the same school). She decided against it and thankfully she was able to make new friends, overcome all the negative stuff, and graduate with high honors earning a full scholarship- she has since graduated from college with high honors and will be starting grad school this fall.

    Well, my son (who was in third grade at the time) had been hearing us offer to homeschool our daughter and, since he absolutely loathed public school, asked if we could homeschool him. At first we told him no (by this time I was attending college again), but then he asked why we wouldn't homeschool him when his behavior had been good but we'd homeschool our daughter with bad behavior..and well, basically guilted us into it :rolleyes: I figured he'd hate it and want to go back the next year, but he LOVED it and has never wanted to go back since.

    I then homeschooled my youngest daughter until second grade. At that point I was teaching second grade and just transferred her to my school. She'll be in fourth grade this year and loves public school. When you ask which she likes best (public or home) she says she likes them both for different reasons.

    I believe that there is good homeschooling and bad homeschooling. There is good public schooling and bad public schooling. Both have benefits and both have drawbacks. I do not believe that only homeschooled kids lack social skills. I knew too many people in public school that couldn't relate well to other people (and still can't to this day).

    I do know a lot of people get upset with a school or teacher or principal and just pull their kids out of public school for whatever reason. I know some who feel their child's physical/emotional/medical needs aren't being met or considered in public school. I know others believe that character isn't taught in public school and want their children to have a strong moral foundation before sending them out into the real world. I know others want to protect and shelter their children. I also know people who can't wait to send their children to public school so they can get a break! We all have our reasons for doing what we do, but don't be fooled- homeschooling is NOT the easy way out!!

    I don't think homeschool is for everyone. But I don't think public school, charter school, or private school is for everyone, either.
     
  11. Pre-K Teacher 1

    Pre-K Teacher 1 Comrade

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    I homeschooled because I wanted my children to have a STRONG moral and religious foundation before they went back to PS. It worked! I think we need to have all options available to families. Public, private, charter, religious, home school, private tutor, and unschool.
     
  12. Joy

    Joy Cohort

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    I was home schooled K-12 and loved it. However, I think that everyone has had some bad experience with either meeting a very odd person that was home schooled or doing it for awhile and not having it work well for them. My mom was a certified elementary teacher and that probably made a big difference. We were also involved in other activities and socializing was never a problem! We had more opportunities to talk with adults and people who weren't just our age. We also were required to take ITBS every year and we covered all subjects and not just ones we were interested in.

    Towards the beginning of our home schooling, we did go to some home school activities but it didn't last long. There were some very strange people at them and we found that it was actually kind of depressing to go to them. You really have to do what works for you.
     
  13. Joy

    Joy Cohort

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    When my parents started homeschooling my sister and I, Iowa was one of the hardest states to do it. Fortunately, we now have more freedom with choosing our children's form of education. I hope that it lasts!
     
  14. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    The reasons why people who I know have homeschooled:

    religious - wanted to shelter their kids from the bad influences in public school, wanted the entire curriculum to involve Bible lessons, did not want certain theories taught

    bad public schools and no $$ for private schools

    flexibility in schedules - yes, I have had people tell me they wanted to homeschool so they could go to Disney in the off season. It isn't just a stereotype.

    wanted to sleep in - this particular woman did not actually homeschool because there was a death in the family during the summer before she started and it was no longer feasible. But she did not want to get up every morning to get her kids off to school so she was going to HS instead.

    Special needs - did not believe thepublic system could give the child what he needed.

    Safety - the assigned school is in a rough neighborhood and appeals were denied.

    Uniforms - the school they had committed to attending went to uniforms after the committment was made. Parents decided to HS instead.

    Bad behavior in school - Kids were sent to the alternative school for bad behavior so the parents pulled them out of the system. One parent said that she was called to the school so often for her son's behavior that she might as well just keep him at home.

    Other students - not just bad behaving ones. But demographics that were not appealing to the parents. A large ESL population or their child would be a minority in the school by a huge margin.

    Princess/Prince syndrome - The teachers just do not recognize the genius that is their child so they do not deserve to be in his/her presence. This is most commonly found in early school years when the child has spent some time in a classroom and he/she keeps having issues with behavior. The child is obviously so smart that he/she is bored and acting out for attention. The teacher does not understand that THEIR child just does not misbehave and it must be the other kids' fault. The discussion of homeschooling started the first time their child was reprimanded/punished in the classroom. No one tells MY child what they can and cannot do except for me!

    Parents' lack of education and knowledge - Mom and/or Dad are not as educated and worry about the child being under the influence of someone who they perceive is smarter than they. Also, what will happen if the child gets smarter and starts wanting more for themselves? He/she will try to move away out of the neighborhood/culture.

    Route of travel - one mother told me she started to homeschool because her child had to travel over a bridge to get to school. The mother has a phobia of bridges and knew she would not be able to get to her child in an emergency.

    Jealousy - Mom (usually) has been the sole provider for knowledge, comfort and joy to the child. She cannot handle the child loving another woman and turning to that woman for help instead of her.

    Those are the reasons I've heard from homeschoolers. I considered it once upon a time because the school system was so horrible where we were moving.
     
  15. alilac

    alilac Rookie

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    Aug 16, 2011

    Many reasons. One size does not fit all. Kids are not cattle to be run through the system using comparison and testing just to get through schooling.

    "Johnny" is not in 3rd grade in all subjects. He may be in 2nd for reading, 4th for math, 3rd for LA. And it's okay. If he excells in science then we can really delve deeper into that interest while still doing the rest.

    "Johnny" isn't being brought up most of his life from 7:30-3:30 by people that don't love him like they do at home.

    "Johnny" can pray over anything he likes, anytime, anywhere at home.

    "Johnny" can read on the couch, snuggled with Mom, seatwork at the coffee table or outside on the patio, screened porch or at the kitchen table. He can recite his math facts while floating in the pool, he can time his laps and subtract the differences.

    "Johnny" can have a soda, or candy monitored by Mom, a snack when he's hungry and home-cooked lunch.

    "Johnny" gets more hands on if needed. "Johnny" physically can go do it instead of read about it.

    "Johnny" reads about real stories, not textbooks with names, dates to be memorized and forgotten.

    "Johnny" can converse with adults as well as children and doesn't spend time saying, "Like" and "you know".

    "Johnny" isn't as concerned about the popular tv show, but enjoys science and history related shows at home, because he doesn't feel he has to keep with the peers.

    "Johnny" can take a vacation with his parents without letting the entire government entity know or have permission to do so. Then spend day and night playing catch-up.

    "Johnny" does better with school later than earlier or earlier than later.

    "Johnny" doesn't have to sit at a desk all day. He can go outside and find a verb and a noun. He can recess when needed instead of being ansy at a desk all day.

    "Johnny" isn't laughed at for being slow.

    "Johnny's" friend are his siblings and enjoys their company.

    "Johnny" learns all the time, in, out, doing, being, without it being from 8-3pm.

    "Johnny" gets to spend time with his family at night, not pushing a pencil for work that couldn't fit into class time.

    "Johnny" gets one on one learning every single day. Don't get it? We don't move on. We get it, then move on. Do we get it and it's easy? We skip and move on. We don't wait for others to catch up and we can slow down when we need to.

    "Johnny" has to know the answers, because there are no classmates to answer for him.

    "Johnny" doesn't need 3 pages of definitions of bullying, weapons, hazing, etc, etc. to read over or his parents to prior to the beginning of the year.

    "Johnny" isn't sick all the time.

    Mom is in charge of "Johnny". Not the teachers or the government.

    "Johnny" gets to keep all of his books, have them at home for his perusal at any time.

    "Johnny's" crayons are his and if he wants a binder he can have one.

    "Johnny" can do lessons orally, instead of spending busywork on writing it all out.

    In school, peers are the main influence in children, but influence should be adult. If you're around 90% children all day, who are they going to learn from? Adults or children?

    Field trips are Mt Rushmore, Grand Canyon, Washington DC. They can physically be visited, instead of only reading about them.

    Then there's the special needs, the gifted child, the child who's family member is dying, and I could go on, but I'm running out of room.

    I think schools see many of the failures. But are not open to really notice or see the higher averages of success.
     

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