Home-School vs Traditional School

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Math, May 4, 2014.

  1. Math

    Math Cohort

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    It is required that teachers have at least a college degree to teach within their field of study. Now, this is what makes teachers highly qualified to teach as well, right? If this is correct is it truly beneficial for kids to be home-schooled at any grade level? I was thinking this may do more harm if the parent or whomever is the instructor if the person has nothing beyond a high school diploma. What are your thoughts?
     
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  3. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Teaching 1 child is completely different than teaching in a school. And as the content gets harder many homeschool parents seek out subject-area experts.

    I definitely don't think a college degree is required to educate your own child.
     
  4. Math

    Math Cohort

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    If you can teach one you can teach many or do you suppose it does not work that way? Do you think there is a potential for a learning gap if the parent decides to have the child enrolled in a school system though?
     
  5. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Different states have requirements for parents home-schooling. Some states do not allow a parent with just a high school diploma to home school.

    Also, some states have rigid policies about proving the child has progressed sufficiently. If the child doesn't, they are no longer allowed to home school.

    As the other poster said, many homeschoolers seek out alternative schooling for their children. In our area there are co-ops designed to teach upper level classes and co-ops to teach even lower level content. They tend to pull resources and often purchase their own curriculum that is designed for homeschooling.
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I don't know a whole lot about homeschooling, but I have heard that the child still needs to pass state tests and have to pass other tests provided by the district he belongs to. So if it's not really working out and the student is not learning anything, it will be obvious.
    I also agree that it is different to teach one child and a whole classroom.

    I think the only disadvantage can be is the socialization aspect, the child may get very isolated and does not have friends, doesn't acquire social skills, etc. However, often that is why homeschooling is required, the child was bullied, has anxiety, etc.

    I have one friend who is homeschooling her son, and based on her posts from Facebook he is way ahead of the normal grade level content and he's able to do a lot of things that aren't offered in schools. He's analyzing Shakespeare, performs in plays, does a lot of science projects, everything is hands on and he seems to be doing well. It seems that the mom is doing a great job.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Many who choose to homeschool do so for reasons beyond state standards.
     
  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I have had many students who begin homeschooled. Many parents begin homeschooling their children in Kindergarten and then enroll their child a few years later when they are ready for 4th or 5th grade.

    Academically these children tend to do fine in school. My experience is that they are often in the top 1/3 in the class. If I only had one child in my class, I could do wonders as well. This benefit is a large one.

    I do find homeschooled students struggle greatly in making friends and fitting in socially.

    I have lots of mixed feelings about homeschooling. I don't think it takes a college degree to teach your own child at home. 25 Kindergartners at one time--that is another thing.
     
  9. 2ndTimeAround

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    In my state there are practically no requirements for homeschooling. Attendance must be taken, a curriculum named (even "none"), and standardized tests taken (given by mom and no consequences if a child fails). Unfortunately many parents wait until high school to enroll their children in public school and it is usually disastrous. The students are not in the top third by any means.
     
  10. gr3teacher

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    My teammate has a student who was homeschooled for K-2... nice kid, extremely bright... absolutely no concept of either rules or socialization.
     
  11. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    I think that the post-secondary schooling (either at the undergraduate level or beyond) is what makes teachers 'highly qualified' to teach /in our educational system/. Obviously, the classes taken in preparation programs are hugely beneficial to the would-be teacher and very much prepare them to be 'highly qualified.'

    However, I think that there is an inherent difference between teaching /in general/ and teaching /in our educational system/. Likewise, I also think that there is an inherent difference between teaching one and teaching many. I'm sure you've heard many teachers complaining of issues related to class sizes, correct? The number of students that you're responsible for at any given time most certainly does make a big difference.

    I'm confused by your last question, though. Are there not already learning gaps within the school systems themselves?
     
  12. 2ndTimeAround

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    In my opinion, homeschooling works well (or extremely well) when the child is exceptionally bright. It is a disaster when the child is average or below average in intelligence.

    Unfortunately, few parents are able to recognize that their children are anything but highly intelligent.
     
  13. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    My sister in law graduated with her BA in elementary education. She never planned to use it to actually teach, but to use it to homeschool her future kids if need be. So far, she has two boys but hasn't started homeschooling because she and my brother have been happy with the school districts the boys have been in.
     
  14. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I love homeschooling! I know several people who have homeschooled or been homeschooled including my siblings. I don't think my parents were the model homeschool, though. Okay, far from it. But done right, it's awesome!

    I do not think a college degree should be required to teach your own children.
     
  15. waterfall

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    I did a paper on home schooling in one of my college classes. I figured I'd find a bunch of negative research because every single "real life" homeschooling situation I knew of turned out to be disastrous for the kid later in life, but literally all the research I could find was extremely positive. I actually sought out research that would prove it was a bad idea to add both sides to my paper, and literally couldn't find any. Now this was almost 10 years ago, but I still think it's interesting.
     
  16. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I have seen both good and bad homeschooling. There have been a couple of high school students from my previous school that were taken out to homeschool, but the parents have never made any attempt to really teach them. One pulled her son out for a semester and then brought them back after a few months. He was so far behind because the work they were doing was so far below where he was supposed to be. I do have a couple of friends that homeschool with younger kids and it is working out great.
     
  17. Upsadaisy

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    I work at a tutoring center. Not a chain center, but a private, kind of exclusive one. The kids consider themselves 'homeschooled'. Middle and high schoolers have different tutors for each subject. All of the students (except some elementary) are enrolled in online curricula like Indiana University, Missouri U, Laurel Springs, etc. So, the tutors don't have the option of teaching whatever they feel like teaching. The schedules are very tight for the kids to complete their courses in the time allowed. I wish there was more leeway, actually. This is a really different kind of homeschooling, but it does exist out there and it works well for many students. We have year-round students and some who travel in to the area for a few weeks or months to compete in the winter and spring. (The ones here short-term are tutored on the materials sent by their home schools.)

    If you want to tutor in the Wellington, FL area, there are opportunities here much better than the chain centers.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I have toyed around with the idea of homeschooling my own children when the time comes. It may not be an option financially, but I would really like to see if we can work it out. I think that I am skilled enough to do the job and make sure that learning happens.

    I've had several previously-homeschooled children in my classes over the years. Honestly, most of them have very poor social skills and seem to struggle with following typical school rules and procedures like raising hands to get the teacher's attention. I'm not sure if this is a product of the homeschooling itself, of the type of family that would opt for homeschooling (if there even is a "type"), or something else. The correlation there certainly seems apparent, though, even if there's no causation, and that's enough to make me hesitate a little.

    I don't think that every homeschooling parent needs to be an expert in every subject. I do think that homeschooling parents should be willing to consider what they know and are skilled at, as well as what they might need outside help on--and work to get that outside help for their kids.
     
  19. a2z

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    It would make sense that homeschooled children would take a while to learn school procedures. Raising one's hand, having almost every action controlled by the environment, and having little individuality allowed takes time to learn. In school, failure to be a compliant robot is seen as defiance.
     
  20. underthesun

    underthesun Rookie

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    Speaking from no teaching experience with homeschooled students, but plenty of experience with friends and cousins and the likes that have been homeschooled: I think that the lack of social skills can be relatively easily countered if the parent makes an effort to counter them. My cousins, for instance, were all homeschooled all the way through high school, but none of them had any lack of social skills, and none of them had issues adjusting to college life afterwards. The way their mother arranged the homeschooling, though, she made sure to be very active in get-togethers with others in the homeschooling community, so they always had plenty of class-like experiences for field trips or days where all of the local kids would get together and do a group lesson, and things like that.

    On the other hand, though, a few of my homeschooled friends have definitely had issues adjusting when they transferred (is that even the right word?) into middle school or high school for the first time. Some didn't, because their parents had used a lot of classroom-like rules so that they were already used to the idea, but others just took a few days to get used to things like asking to use the restroom and whatnot.

    Long story short, I just think it depends on the parent. As someone who seems well aware of the potential social downfalls, my guess is that you'd go the extra lengths to make sure your kids had plenty of social experiences. :)
     
  21. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I understand. That doesn't make it any easier on the student, though. Where I've seen the biggest problem has been when the formerly-homeschooled kid becomes frustrated that the teacher isn't immediately available 100% of the time to address an individual need.

    For the record, I don't think it's about being a "compliant robot". A teacher is typically the only adult (or one of very few adults) in a room along with many children. Without rules and procedures, things could quickly devolve into chaos. Rules and procedures aren't the devil, just part of the system that everyone has to learn to navigate if they want to be successful in it.
     
  22. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I have several friends who homeschool their children. Each takes a different approach. Each seems to be working, though I have my reservations about a few.

    One friend I think does it best. Her two sons primarily school at home, but do attend public school several times a week for gifted courses and some years for music or art, depending on how the schedule works and if the kids are interested. They are also involved in a homeschool group, which has a Lego team, and a 4-H club that they are very active in, as well as other enrichment activities. They are rarely at home, as they do frequent field trips to parks, nature preserves, science museums, libraries, etc. The kids are well-socialized, inquisitive, polite, and intelligent. The parents carefully monitor their academic progress against state standards, and the students take state tests to make sure they are performing well. (They always make top marks!)

    Another of my friends does a more traditional homeschool, where they have a curriculum online. They do it because the parents travel often, and didn't want to pull the child out of school often, so now school travels with them. While the child is seeing the world, I do worry that the child mostly interacts with adults and isn't learning how to be a child, really.

    My other friends who homeschool are really into the unschooling movement. Their day has little structure, and students set their own goals and learn through daily activities. There are five children, and they live in a fairly isolated area. I worry the most for them because there is no one ensuring academic progress, and really no measure of growth at all. But, it works for that family, and the children do not seem to be harmed by it, so whatever.

    In all three of these cases, both parents are college educated and living at home. I do think that makes a big difference in the success of different cases. Also, in each case, both the parents and the children are academically gifted (I know all of these people from gifted ed activities) which also may contribute to the success of the programs. The key is to find the right program for the kid and parents. If it's a struggle, then maybe look at more traditional schooling options.
     
  23. a2z

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    I didn't say rules are the devil, but it certainly is a different way of acting. Some kids, homeschooled or not, struggle with it, and others take to it easily. Much depends on personality. That is why you have multiple children in families that behave differently.

    However, I think the idea that homeschooling is a bad thing because kids don't learn to do school the way school does it is a bit short sighted. I've seen kids pulled from school to be homeschooled because they weren't learning in the classroom. I've seen parents homeschool from the start and the kids who are of average intelligence come to school way advanced for their grade and with social skills but not some of the classroom skills desired. Some also lack, for a better term, street smarts to deal with the type of students they may never had to deal with before. Heck, I've seen that problem with kids that have moved from other areas who are now struggling because of the "social skills" in the new location.

    Some kids will come from homeschooling ahead of the curve in every way and some behind. That is because kids are all different and people are people.

    Just think, that struggling kid might have been an extreme struggle in class had he been in public school all along. That might have been the kid that kept everyone from learning who needed the 1:1 attention in order to learn. It is easy to draw a correlation and have it inaccurate. (I might be wrong, too.)
     
  24. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I never suggested this.
     
  25. a2z

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    Apologies. That was just a general comment to the topic. I didn't adequately explain that.

    Obviously you aren't against homeschooling if you were toying with the idea.
     
  26. HorseLover

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    as a homeschooled person myself

    As someone who was homeschooled all throughout elementary, middle, and high school, and am currently a teacher in a public school, I can say that I LOVE it! Certainly their can be bad situations, but that can occur in any private school as well. I truly believe that is is not only suitable for the very bright students, but can be beneficial for any level (though not necessarily every kid no matter their abilities). My mom does not have a college degree at all, and I went on to do very well in college. While I know there are some counter-examples, much research has shown that homeschoolers tend to do very well upon entering college because they are used to working more independently. As for the socialization aspect, there is more and more available for people who homeschool; clubs, sports, even proms!
     
  27. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Of the people I know who were homeschooled, this is one of the main reasons they weren't successful in college. They were not used to dealing with different personalities and different rules in all of their various classes, and they had no "real world" problem solving skills. My mom has a close friend who homeschooled all of her children. Most people would probably say they "did it right." The kids took AP classes, got great SAT scores, and were part of plenty of clubs/activities and a social homeschool group that went on field trips. Honestly, they just weren't prepared for a teacher that wasn't their mom, haha. One of them failed several classes because she was "helping a friend" the night before final exams and didn't have time to study. She honestly assumed the professors would let her take the exams on a different day if she simply explained the situation. She ended up dropping out because she couldn't handle all of the "unfairness." Another of her siblings dropped out after about 2 months when she was apparently traumatized after being locked out of her dorm for 20 minutes, and the third sibling dropped out after claiming that the professors were not teaching the way he liked and didn't pay enough attention to him. One of my best friends freshman year also lasted only a couple of months because she claimed she wasn't used to not having someone "making her" complete all of her assignments and go to class. She was used to having a teacher who was only focused on her and her needs. When "class" was at home, she had no choice but to go. The sad part is, she was absolutely brilliant- just totally unprepared for life on her own.
     
  28. 2ndTimeAround

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    These are similar to the experiences I've had as well. I had one student tell me as I was handing out tests that she wasn't ready for the test and would take it the next day after school. Uh, no you won't. I had one frantic mother in tears because her "straight A" daughter was failing my class three weeks in. Mom couldn't understand why I wouldn't let the child take the test over and over until she got the score she wanted. And one boy was in tears himself because I chastised him for calling out all the time. He was more knowledgeable than most of his classmates and was tired of having to wait while I answered questions that he already knew the answers to. So he would shout out answers in the hopes of moving things along. The concept of wait time eluded him.
     

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