Home Pre-Schools?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Miss J. Pre-K, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Aug 18, 2011

    I'm starting a home pre-school this school year in my parent's home. I have pretty much all the materials I need, including naptime/outdoor play equipment, and center materials. I have one newborn baby (in October), a two-year-old, and a four-year-old enrolled, and I may have another baby part-time and a two-year-old part time. I'm not going to be licensed, at least at first, and I'm following the local school system's schedule (I'll be keeping teachers' kids). This is a first for me, and while I'm excited about the staying home part, I could use any and all advice or ideas. What would you do if you could plan anything in your classroom? Do anything? :)
     
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  3. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Aug 18, 2011

    My advise is if you have children from more than one family GET LICENSED! Most families will expect it but even more importantly, you are putting yourself and your family at great financial risk of liability. Around here you wouldn't be able to get insurance so your parents, as the homeowners, would be liable for running an unlicensed center. Also, expect the neighbors to complain about the extra traffic, noise, etc. and go to the city who will discover you don't have both a business license and a daycare license.

    I am sorry, but it is a really bad idea to start without the basics to protect yourself.
     
  4. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Aug 18, 2011

    I totally agree with scmom! Get licensed.

    That said, I really have enjoyed my time in this field. I will be moving in the future to public school....so my family can have the home back....but it was a great plan.
     
  5. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Aug 18, 2011

    My DD has a PS in her home. She also has a variety of ages. I notice that her general set up is lacking since she has to make it safe for the little ones. She is not able to set up an art area--the little ones get into everything. I have suggested to her that she open an infant room, and she is thinking about it.
     
  6. busybeeprek

    busybeeprek Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2011

    I don't disagree with the comments about being licensed as being safer. However, if I am counting right, you will only have 5 kids. In Arkansas it is legal to operate with 6 without a license. Not sure if that is the case in North Carolina but you could check. My grandmother had an in-home daycare for most of my life and she was only licensed for a portion of that time. She did it so that she could keep more kids, but in the end decided that she liked having a smaller group and let her license go. She is still well-known for her daycare and many people used her throughout the years. It can be done if it is done within the realms of what is developmentally appropriate.
     
  7. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Aug 19, 2011

    I don't know the answer to this question... but what is the point where it becomes a home preschool and not babysitting... even if it was considered babysitting, you could still do curriculum and preschool stuff. Is that how it's considered in order to not need the licensing?
     
  8. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Aug 19, 2011

    Here if you are looking after children from more than one family and being paid for it and it is more than occasional babysitting, you need to be licensed. It protects children because the site is inspected and the daycare person has to have some training and go through a background check, etc. An unlicensed person may have no training, have a criminal record and the site may be unsafe. Also you can't get insurance without a license and your regular homeowner's insurance doesn't cover a business being run in the home. In our area, you would also need a permit from the city and your home would have to be zoned for it or they hold a hearing and the neighbors have to agree. It is cheaper and easier to run without a license but it puts you at great risk of liability. I don't know why any parent would put their child in that situation. Maybe the rules are different in your state, and I apologize if I am sounding strident but there have been horror stories of unlicensed situations. Here a local daycare (big one) hadn't bothered to get a license, someone asked the licensing agency and they closed they down the next day. She will never be able to get a license again, in my opinion.
     
  9. pink

    pink Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2011

    Go outside a lot! Take lots of walks and do a lot of things with nature. It seems like that's something I always want to do but the school always has rules about where we can go and it's basically the fenced in area.

    I would also do longer projects and encourage children to leave creations (blocks, for example) to work on more the following day.

    Let me get into the school year and I'm sure I'll have a lot of other ideas about what I wish I could do if there weren't so many rules! Good luck!!
     
  10. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Aug 19, 2011

    In WA you can only watch one families children without a license as scmom said.

    I love having my own program. I have infants, but I have a really low teacher child ratio. 1:4 children. We find ways to have the art area open and things like that and just make the "away" spot see through and show the proper age children how to open it. However, I have seen my share of programs where the duties of caring for small children ended up outweighing the education of the bigs. I know my clients don't feel that way, nor does the school I feed into.
     

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