Holding kids after the bell

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Mar 11, 2019.

  1. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Mar 11, 2019

    What do you think of this as a classroom management strategy?

    I have common planning after my difficult class this year, so I don't have kids coming in right away. Over the past few weeks, I've been using time after the bell as a classroom management strategy. At first, I thought that holding the whole class after the bell would be effective, but it was not.

    I've been writing down+ keeping track of disruptions and I told the kids that if they have more than 1 disruption, they will owe me seconds after the bell. I usually have them sit for about 10-15 seconds while their friends leave class. It isn't enough to make kids late as their classes are in the same hallway. One group has class upstairs but the teacher told me that if the kids are being bad, I can keep them as long as I want haha. I usually end up having about 6-7 kids stay in a class of 33. (Friday was bad though and I had 12 kids stay.)

    I know that we are technically not supposed to do this, but it wasn't reasonable to assign detention to 6-7 kids a day. This strategy has really helped with classroom management because it gave the kids some incentive to listen and they don't like staying after. I think the "good" kids are also better behaved because they see that there is some (minor) consequence for bad behavior. The issue is that I obviously don't catch ALL of the behaviors. Earlier, I would count down from 5 and there was no incentive to stop talking when I got to one. Now, I usually have 95%-100% of the kids quiet when I count down (on good days) and the behavior has been better.

    Does anyone else use this as a classroom management strategy?
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Mar 11, 2019

    If it's only a few seconds, I think it's okay, but I'd be careful about not making them late to their next class if you are using this regularly. In my own class, I'll have students stay after to talk to me if their behavior was particularly bad, but not very often. It seems that it could be an effective small consequence, as you've already observed. Small consequences are very important! You need things that annoy them just enough to deter them from acting out, but not so big that you're escalating the situation. Staying after for 10-20 seconds would certainly do that. I worry, though, that it may lose its luster after a week or so if it keeps drawing the same students. Please update us later on!
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2019
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  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    I've been using this strategy for a few weeks now. The behavior hasn't been great (or good) but it's improved. I've had lessons where they would not stop talking even when I counted down and that doesn't happen anymore since I tell them there's a consequence if I get to 1 and they're still talking. They are doing better at listening to each other when they are talking which is good. They also mostly do the do now silently. The behavior still isn't great but it is a little better. I think it is because there is slight accountability for behavior now but I am also worried that it will wear off. I do know that the kids do not like staying after because it takes a little bit of their time to socialize.
     
  5. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    Mar 12, 2019

    I do that sometimes but instead of making them stay between classes I make them stay at lunch or recess. And I use the time to chat with the kids about their behaviour, reiterate expectations etc. rather than just us staring at each other.
    And I use increments of minutes. So I don’t say a word about the bad behaviour because I don’t wanna waste class time or get into a “discussion” with the student, I just write the name on the board with a 1 after the name. They keep talking the number increases. They do the right thing the number decreases. The number at the end of the lesson is what they owe me.
    But I don’t do it that often tho. Only when I’m really annoyed.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Mar 12, 2019

    Staying for lunch or recess is a much better idea. As the potentially next teacher where these students should be, I will not enjoy waiting for them to show up, nor enjoy catching them up when they walk in late, disrupting my class that is in session. I am even hesitant about lunch, since many lunch periods are already tragically short. But al least if you are spending the lunch period with them, they know how important discipline is to you. That may mean something to them.
     
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Mar 12, 2019

    I did this when I was student teaching (it was middle school). As most things, it wears off after a while but it was effective for a few weeks. I had to make sure not to make the kids late for their next class, but when it was before break or lunch, I was able to hold them longer. Actually we had a block schedule, so it was really only 1st period that had to go to their next class.
    I released the "good" kids first, just a few seconds before the bell rang (not too long that it would be a problem, and it was only a few kids, the exceptionally good one). the rest I released as the bell rang and held back the misbehaving ones. They hated it, and the great kids loved the recognition.
     
  8. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Mar 12, 2019

    I agree but all of the kids have different lunches and we aren't allowed to keep kids for lunch. Our kids don't have recess. We can only assign after school detentions.
     

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