Hmm. I think I'm on the spectrum.

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by sarypotter, Aug 22, 2008.

  1. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    I know that might sound odd. But I thought about it a lot yesterday, after yet another day of trying unsuccessfully to adapt to social situations, and I really think I am. It's not unheard-of to figure that sort of thing out late; my sister was diagnosed with Aspergers at 30, years after her daughter was diagnosed with autism, and our father, although undiagnosed, is definitely on the spectrum.

    I was mentally "taking notes" yesterday during training. I have a really hard time making eye contact or knowing how to act at staff development events. I spent an exhausting day trying to figure out where to sit, where to look, what to say, and when to move. I have trouble sorting out what people are saying to me in those situations, and it takes me a minute to respond. Then they stare at me like I'm kind of crazy, or like what I said didn't make sense in context, although I'm fairly certain it did.

    Couple these sorts of issues with my extreme klutziness and the fact that I kept notebook upon notebook filled with notes on equine science from the time I was old enough to write until well into high school, and I really think I might be on the spectrum!

    The funny thing is, after half the day of meetings yesterday, I was so stressed out that went back to my classroom and closed myself in the sensory room, LOL! I might get as much use out of it as the kids ... :p

    LUCKILY -- the company of children does NOT stress me out -- particularly not my kids with autism. I can't wait to get them back Monday!
     
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  3. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    At my old school, people used to call me "Spectrum" for some of the reasons you're stating. I zip my jackets up all of the way and button my shirts to the top button. I have "outfits" that I've made in my closet (as in, pants go with shirt, go with socks, every time). I eat the same thing every day for lunch. I sometimes am so straightforward with people that it's awkward. I've never "felt" different or "out of it" but other people definitely notice my social oddities. I was ADHD as a kid (and guess I still am, for that matter) - but I was also in the Gifted and Talented school program from grades 3-8. I have crazy memorization abilities (as in I can remember what page a word is on in a book.... people's phone numbers from 4 years ago....etc.) I can't stand certain smells, have lots of weird sensory things (don't like tags touching my back, don't like the lines in the socks, my backpacks all had the straps as tight as they could go....) Also, if you ever saw pictures of my classroom.... you'd know that EVERYTHING has a place, is put in order, color coded, labeled, etc. People used to joke if my students didn't have autism before I got them, they surely would after they left my class, haha. I don't think it's that out of the question - I actually took an online Aspergers Quiz and I scored in the "highly likely to be diagnosed" category.

    It's not out of the question! Nor is it a bad thing...
     
  4. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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  5. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    LOL! I took that quiz too; maybe not the same one. The one I took said people actually diagnosed with autism usually scored a 32 or higher. I scored a 36 ...

    I'm extremely organized, too, except not by any system that makes sense to anyone else, so everyone else thinks I'm really disorganized. I just sort of put things places and them remember where they are. It makes total sense in my head. According to my partner, though, many things that make sense in my head make little sense elsewhere, lol.

    I've still got sounds I can't stand to hear, but that list is a lot shorter than it was when I was little. The sound of someone sweeping carpet still makes my skin crawl (that's why they invented vacuum cleaners, people!), but I can tolerate jingling change and whistling now, lol. I used to be quite the little tyrant about sounds I didn't like. I'm not sensitive to smell at all, except that certain smells trigger vivid memories of the last time I smelled them, but I think everyone does that. (Like smelling a shampoo you used in high school and it takes you right back.) I have a lot of little routines and scheduling idiosyncrasies, but they work for me. You're right -- it's not a bad thing at all! I keep trying to explain that to my niece, who has a strong aversion even to the word "autism," poor darling.

    Okay, I'm rambling. Thanks for answering; that's interesting! I guess it explains why we went into the profession we did!
     
  6. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Speaking of not being able to tolerate certain sounds... talk radio I cannot stand. I literally cover my ears. Not like the radio show hosts on the main radio stations, I'm talking like NPR type radio. Where someone is TALKING in my EAR. I can't stand that. Haha. My husband thinks I'm nuts but I will almost immediately switch the station if it's one of those guys talking on NPR.
     
  8. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    Took the quiz:

    << Your Aspie score: 180 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 24 of 200
    You are very likely an Aspie >>
     
  9. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    haha!
     
  10. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    My dad was diagnosed with aspergers at age 58.

    One of the reasons for the rise in spectrum diagnoses is simply because many people in older generations went undiagnosed. Adult dianosis is actually becoming more and more common.
     
  11. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    For me, it depends on what they're saying ... :p:lol:

    I'm that way with car commercials, but then again, who isn't?
     
  12. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    I actually was diagnosed with nonverbal learning disability when I was in school, which is similar to Aspergers.

    Bright lights and loud sounds bother me and I can't focus if too much is going on at once. I found myself covering my ears today when the kids were eating inside because I couldn't take the noise.

    I promise though, I seem normal enough!
     
  13. Ghost

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    Okay, I took the quiz and it said that I have both Aspie and Neurotypical traits....:lol: I'm half 'n half. I've always had problems with bright lights and sounds at certain pitches. I always have to do things my way and it is very hard for me to make changes. In fact, hubby is always shocked if I go somewhere by myself or order something different.
     
  14. Rockys_Mom

    Rockys_Mom Rookie

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    I'm mostly neurotypical according to this test. I took it out of curiosity. I've been diagnosed with a different mental health disorder and I wondered where it fit according to this test.

    I'm a raging self-stimmer with a nasty oral fixation. At almost 26 I JUST got to the point where I've pretty much stopped biting my nails, but things are constantly in my mouth, gum and hard candy are my best friend. I'm a "picker" so my cuticles and the skin around my nails look horrible. When I was younger I used to pick at zits constantly (I've just made myself sound SO attractive haven't I?) I'm very routine driven and have actually put myself on a "to the 5 minute mark" And if I don't start an activity at a 5 or 0 on the clock, I wait until it is.

    I'm slowly taking steps to reduce a lot of the traits I have, or channel them into an appropriate outlet. Just wish I hadn't realized a lot of this until I was 26. I wonder how different life would have been if I realized these things before.
     
  15. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Oh my gosh! I have the clock problem!! Everyone in college used to joke in about how I "had to start on the o'clock!" (on the hour)....homework, laundry, cleaning, etc.

    I thought I was the only weird one with that special trait!

    That's so funny.
     
  16. Rockys_Mom

    Rockys_Mom Rookie

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    It drives my boyfriend nuts. Actually right now he wants to go to the grocery store and I told him he had to wait 4 minutes (it's 9:21)!!

    I thought I was the only crazy clock person too!!!!
     
  17. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    My results:

    Your Aspie score: 110 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 69 of 200
    You are very likely an Aspie

    I'm not the least bit surprised.
     
  18. JustJim

    JustJim Companion

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    Late diagnoses don't come as a surprise, but if you are going to consider the idea it might be worth looking at a screening instrument that has some scientific support: http://www.msnbc.com/modules/newsweek/autism_quotient/

    The AQ (linked above) is only a screening instrument, but it might help you decide if you want to pursue a diagnosis (and your diagnostician will take it a lot more seriously than than the RDOS instrument. (I'm not saying the RDOS is not valid, merely that it lacks publication and peer review).
     
  19. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    Aug 23, 2008

    Hehe. 41. "32-50 Very High -- Most people with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism score about 35"
     
  20. positiveautism

    positiveautism Comrade

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    Here are my results.

    Aspie Quiz:
    Your Aspie score: 87 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 101 of 200
    You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

    Autism Quotient:
    32 (most people with Asperger's score 35)

    I think that it really helps me as a teacher of students with autism. I often feel like I have an instinct as to what will help my students learn, and how to teach them in an effective way.

    There's also an interesting article on this topic: Do we all have a little bit of autism? http://regulus2.azstarnet.com/blogs/puzzlepieces/10306

    Stephen Shore is a man on the spectrum who has gotten a doctoral degree in special education. He's written a book or two, I believe. For my autism newsletter ( http://www.positivelyautism.com/ )I also recently interviewed a young man on the spectrum who is currently getting his bachelor's degree in special education and is planning to be a teacher.

    Go Aspie teachers! :)

    Nicole
     
  21. JustJim

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    On a good day, I get a 49; bad days the score goes up.

    FWIW, many of the individuals I know who have received late diagnoses score in the mid thirties to low forties on the AQ.

    Jim
     
  22. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Aspie-quiz:

    Aspie score: 81 of 200
    Neurotypical Score: 142 of 200

    very likely neurotypical

    Autism quotient:
    25

    I actually am surprised, I've seen myself closer to the spectrum in some areas...
     
  23. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I took the test twice and got a 28, then a 27. So, what does that mean?:haha:
     
  24. JustJim

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    I'm not at home so I don't have access to my extended notes, but as I recall that puts you in the range where a clinician probably wouldn't consider further evaluation for ASD. The AQ is just a screening instrument, not a diagnostic tool (but it can also be a very useful tool to use to show NT parents/teachers/administrators how some individuals with ASD differ from the norm.)
     
  25. Beth561

    Beth561 Comrade

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    I just took the quiz,answering the questions in regard to how our son acts, We've recently begun to suspect that he may have Asbergers. He's 12 and we have always dismissed his differences as quirkiness or "marching to his own band" type of thing but now as he is getting older, his behavior is almost heartbreaking-he is sooo uncomfortable in most social circumstances. In fact, when he had to fill out his information for his classes this past week-he wrote "I don't like to talk but if I have to then I don't like to look at you" on every sheet for every teacher-it was in response to the question:tell me something about yourself. The only reason why I would like to get him tested is because we now tend to lose patience with him. If he gets diagnosed then we can learn ways to better help him and teach our daughter a better way to deal with her brother. BTW, he got a 143 out of the 200 on the quiz but I answered with a ? on a bunch of them and it was for adults not kids so maybe he would score differently if he had the kids version. What do you think?
     
  26. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Justjim...Do you know of an online tool like the link you provided that parents could use to evaluate their kids? I'm not talking about self diagnosis, but more of a curiosity thing...like is my kid just wierd or should I bring up his behavior with a doc kind of thing.
     
  27. JustJim

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    mmswm--I'm Just Jim (got tired of people calling me "James":D).

    I've not seen an online tool intended for children that works in the same manner as the the various sites that allow people to take the AQ. However, there are versions of the AQ for children and adolescents; both can be found on the web. Keep in mind that these are just screening instruments; they don't establish a diagnosis. I would urge anyone considering the use of these instruments even in curiosity to read and consider the entire paper; there is a great deal of information there.

    The adolescent version is:
    Baron-Cohen, S., Hoekstra, R. A., Knickmeyer, R., and Wheelwright, S (2006) The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ)--Adolescent Version, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders (36) 343-350.

    The version for children is:
    Auyeung, B., Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S. and Allison, C. (2008), The Autism Spectrum Quotient: Children's Version (AQ-Child) and has been or will be published in JADD.

    Both of these can be downloaded from the website of the Autism Research Centre at http://www.autismresearchcentre.com/pubs/search.asp Enter the title and download the papers. If you enter "AQ" as your search term, you will get a great deal of information on testing and validation of the AQ in various populations.

    I've not yet worked with the child's version, but after some testing/experimentation with the adolescent version I would be comfortable making recommendations for further evaluation based on the results.

    Jim
     
  28. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Jim...I'm bad with the shift key, sorry. I was just curious, not for any of my own kids (I have a child with mild CP, I'm way to familiar with the pedi neuro's office), but because the question would eventually come up and you are extremely knowledgable in this area. I would never consider an on-line tool as a diagnostic tool, but I've heard a lot of parents wonder out loud if they should bring up certain eccentricities in their children's behavior to their doctors. Something like that could give the parents of kids either reassurance, or the push they need to talk to the child's doctor.
     
  29. JustJim

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    Not a problem, mmswm.

    I've been meaning to assemble a web page with resources along these lines; I'll get to work on that as soon as I get caught up on other stuff.

    Beth561, it might be worthwhile to run the adolescent version of the AQ for your son, or even to pursue a clinical evaluation. But no matter what you do along those lines, you can always do your own evaluations or assessments to see how he communicates most effectively, how to communicate with him most effectively, and how to help him learn to learn and function. A diagnosis is just a (partial) explanation--it doesn't really let you know all the stuff he can or cannot do, or how to work most effectively with him. Good luck!

    Jim
     
  30. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Re: Aspergers, what are the main symptoms and what do you do for a child with it? I have had a couple of 4 year olds in the past that were definately "different," but we are not in a postion to diagnose. Parents are so sensitive to anything being "wrong" with their child at this age and when we see suspect something of this nature,we can't outright tell them, but may suggest they should have their child's "hearing," etc, evaluated by a Pediatrician. Some problems have been picked up by a sharp doctor, but other times the mother brings the child back from an appointment and says, "He/she is just fine, nothing wrong!"
     
  31. Beth561

    Beth561 Comrade

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    Jim, thanks for your insight. Yes, I totally agree with you that the diagnosis will only give us an explanation concerning his idiosyncrasies. My husband is great with modeling and giving our son the opportunities to learn how to do things for himself. For instance, our son walks a neighbor's dog 5 days a week. One day she had just returned home and was unpacking her car when he showed up, she gave him the house key to go in and get the dog.Our son left the key in the door,she felt that he did it because it was difficult to get out-needed to be jiggled etc. A few weeks later she had to go out of town for the weekend and called us to explain her concern. My husband met our son at her house and showed him how to do it correctly-he then asked our son why he left the key in the door the last time and our son replied "so she'd know where it was." I think that he reasoned that one out ok but once again, he didn't even consider asking her where she wanted him to put it or simply leaving it on the counter top etc. I just don't know what to pass off as typical boy behavior or a symptom of a thinking process disorder.(And I lose my patience with a lot of the stuff he does because I just don't understand why everything has to be so fully explained in minute detail. -I sometimes I think he just doesn't feel like thinking, that he has some sort of learned helplessness thing going on- and that he has learned to put everything back on us when he is asked to do anything-if I ask him to set the table for dinner I have to tell him everything that needs to be on the table-almost every night! (I know I must sound horrible and I swear that I don't let him see my frustration most of the time) Basically, the diagnosis could help me (and his sister) learn to be more understanding of his personality.I hope this makes sense-I think I rambled. Sorry.
     
  32. Beth561

    Beth561 Comrade

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    Hey Jim,
    I just took the test for him and I got a score of 43 (maybe 41-I was unsure of a couple of them) out of 50. It doesn't say what this score means-although I do have an idea. I am actually relieved that there may be something going on within him and he is not simply a product of bad parenting-BTW-his teachers love him-I swear, we've been told that he is the most polite/kindest etc. child they have ever taught. Thanks again for your help.
    Beth
     
  33. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    Okay, I just took the Newsweek version and scored 34. I knew I had tendencies but I wish I had this information growing up. It would have been easier to accept than to just think I was socially retarded.
     
  34. Chokita

    Chokita Comrade

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    I think this test can't be a good measure to determine who's on the spectrum. Otherwise, anybody who is an introvert would be considered autistic (and that's not true!).
     
  35. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    It's not a test, it's a screening tool. There's a difference. A tests diagnoses something. A screening tool gives a medical professional a little bit more information so he or she can decide wether a test is needed.

    I'm extremely introverted IRL. I don't like parties, I'd rather read a book then talk to more than one person. I hate meeting new people (unless they're students), I get upset if my routine is upset, I see patterns in everything (My degrees are in math). I answered the questions honestly and scored only a 25, which is well below where a doctor would consider further testing.
     
  36. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I have those same qualities, hate parties and talking with a group of people, or even one for that matter. My morning routine is of utmost importance and I have been late for work because of it. I scored a 28 on the test.
     
  37. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Then, in my unscientific survey of two introverts, the screening tool does a good job of seperating the introverts from people who could possibly be autistic. :D

    (Now there's a good use for a MS in mathematical statistics :D)
     
  38. TeachersHubby

    TeachersHubby New Member

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    As an INTP / HF ASD (Aspie) I thought I'd pipe in.

    This would be true in the case of moderate Introverts, but not all.

    You are looking at a classic bit of logic. All Aspies are Introverts, but not all Introverts are Aspies - though it could be close.

    Remember, ALL of the (I) profiles in the MBTI cumlatively make up only 4%-6% of the total population, and it would not suprise me at all to find 1% of the general population to be High Functioning Adult Aspies. Remember, we didn't have the "luxury" of diagnosis. We either worked with it and succeeded dispite it or disappeared into the system. Most were able to work with it. That's the whole "High Functioning" bit.

    Long before I took the two quizes I took multiple "Career" tests, including the MBTI. I literally rolled off the charts on I & T and tend to be enviornmentaly variable on J/P, with P being dominant. My N is average/strong. (My Strong & MAPP show similar trendlines.)

    In the past couple of years, I've been becoming more "classicly symptomatic" and started looking into what's up. I discovered the DSM VI and the 1994 inclusion of Aspergers and have been reviewing my life in light of it since.

    FWIW, My Low on the AS is 40.
    Tonight's AQ is 120.

    So the answer is - Not necessairly, but quite possibly. The MBTI may just be a way to help identify Adult Aspies - just like the AS & AQ.
     
  39. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    I might actually pursue this, simply because, when my sister was diagnosed, it seemed to help my niece some. She's twelve, has autism, and finds even the word "autism" extremely aversive. She still doesn't want to hear it, but she's stopped fixating on it quite so much since Jennifer's diagnosis. If I actually am on the spectrum, and we knew it, maybe that would help her realize that it's not a bad thing and it's okay.
     
  40. Beth561

    Beth561 Comrade

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    Aug 30, 2008

     
  41. TeachersHubby

    TeachersHubby New Member

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    Sure.

    INTP is one of the 16 Types in the Myers Briggs Personality Type Indicator. It stands for Introverted, iNtuitive, Thinking, Percieving which stands in opposition to ESFJ, Extroverted, Sensing, Feeling, Judging. There are 16 total combinations of the 4 oppositional pairs.

    I rate off the charts in Introversion and Thinking. I am within the statistical margin of error between Judging & Perceiving, though further typing shows a tendency toward Percieving. I have a statistically solit central tendency toward iNtuitive thinking.

    HF ASD - High Functioning Autisim Spectrum Disorder. Asperger's Syndrome (Aspie) is the most common.

    Strong: The Strong Interest Inventory (SII) is a psychological test used in career assessment. It is also frequently used for educational guidance as one of the most popular personality assessment tools.

    MAPP: Motivational Appraisal of Personal Potential is an assessment that defines the motivational levels of a person.

    DSM VI: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder vol 6. The DSM is the Primary Psychiatric reference book. Asperger's syndrom was included in 1994.

    Much like people with Post Polio Syndrome, as I get older, more of the symptomatic aspects of Aspergers that I was apparantly able to mask/suppress are coming forward.

    FWIW: For What It's Worth
    AS: The Cambridge Autisim Spectrum (as seen on MSN)
    AQ: The Autisim Quiz
     

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