History and coaching?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Histo_AC, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. Histo_AC

    Histo_AC Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2010

    I am a high school student that really wants to become a Secondary History teacher in the near future. I was looking through a local universities History Degree with secondary education and I found that Coaching was put on the site along with it. I found it kind of strange, but not too strange because I have seen a few coaches at my school who taught history too.

    Is this common, because I really want to become a history teacher, but coaching is not for me at all.

    What are your thoughts on this? Have you seen a rise in coaches who are also History teachers. Is your school district still hiring history teachers who aren't coaches?

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Aug 5, 2010

    In my area it's completely separate. Athletics hiring is different than Academics hiring.
     
  4. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Different areas have different needs. Perhaps the majority of High School History teachers that graduate from that college also become coaches.

    Shoot an email off to the school
     
  5. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Aug 6, 2010

    It's one of those stereotypes grounded in reality that history teachers are often coaches as well.

    Let me explain.

    In order to teach math at all, you need a certain level of expertise in mathematics.

    In order to teach English at all, you need a certain level of expertise in English.

    And in order to teach science at all, you need a certain level of expertise in science.

    In any of the above subjects, a person who has only had a few college courses in those subjects would be very uncomfortable teaching them.

    But history is different. A lot of people who have only taken the basic U.S. history and government courses in college are more than willing to try and teach it. Note that I said "try."

    History is very popular as a minor in college because the courses are perceived as easy. A lot of Phys. Ed. majors choose history as a minor for that reason. But let me tell you this. I majored in history and it was not easy. (I also never coached a day in my life).

    Now, let's say that a school needs a football coach. They can't hire a football coach full time - very few schools, if any, have the money for that. And they already have enough P.E. teachers.

    So what do they do? They find a qualified coach who happens to have taken a few history classes in college. They hire the person to teach a few sections U.S. history, and civics. But that person is really there to coach football, and everyone knows that.

    Mind you, this practice is not nearly as common now as it used to be.

    Fortunately for you, the trend is moving away from that. This is actually one of the bright sides to No Child Left Behind. Schools can't get away with having a history teacher who has only had a few history classes.

    A few more things.

    If you like research and writing, history is a fun major to have in college.

    In spite of the coaching stereotype I mentioned, the fact is that schools want teachers who are subject matter experts. They want historians to teach history, scientists to teach science etc. My teaching credential may have legally authorized me to teach in the state of California, but my undergraduate gpa is what got me hired.
     
  6. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    I think the above comments about the trend moving away from that is accurate. I don't coach anything, but teach history. That said, I also do a lot of technology work, and that gave me a hiring edge over those that might coach....
     
  7. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Many of our history teachers do not coach. We also have many English, Math, and Foreign Language teachers who do. It's not specific to history anymore.
     
  8. Histo_AC

    Histo_AC Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2010

    Thanks for all the comments. This makes me feel much better about becoming a history teacher. I really want to teach history for the love of history and the love of teaching people so I'm glad to hear this.

    I guess I was just kind of scared because this trend still happens a lot in my school. A lot of the newer teachers are teach for america though and pretty good with high expectations. But in my Sophmore year I had the not great pleasure of coming a cross a horrible history teacher/coach that only made us do book work. So I was afraid that a lot of school districts don't value history teaching as much.

    I am very glad to see I was very wrong.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 6, 2010

    Almost everyone in my building does some extra curricular.

    But we have so many sports, there's no way any one department could cover it. So, sure, the basketball coach teaches history-- he's also one of the deans.

    But the golf coach teaches English. The football coach also teaches English. The bowling coach is the math department chair.

    Another of the history teachers coached Speech and Debate for over 20 years. Another history teacher coached it for 10.

    There's no real correlation in my school.
     
  10. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    In our area the schools prefer to hire someone at the school to coach who is already an employee rather than hiring an outside coach because they know the kids, school policies, etc. It can be anyone - we have teachers in every area, counselors, campus supervisors and clerical people who all earn extra money coaching. Many schools require teachers to do something extracurricular but it certainly does not have to be teaching - it can be a club, tutoring or whatever.
     
  11. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2010

    In my school district there is a high percentage of history teachers that are coaches.

    Or is it the other way around?
     

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