Historical Fiction

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by tinadog, Jan 14, 2008.

  1. tinadog

    tinadog Rookie

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    Jan 14, 2008

    Has anyone read Johnny Tremain aloud to fifth graders? The vocabulary seems challenging. I would be thankful for any recommendations for an interesting (to fifth graders) read aloud that is set in US history. Thank you.
     
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  3. luv2teach415

    luv2teach415 Companion

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    Jan 14, 2008

    Just to let you know about Johnny Tremain. I was thinking about that book for my 5th grade social studies class being we just finished the revolutionary war. I found out the the 7th grade class is reading Johnny Tremain and some of the vocabulary was difficult for them as well. Just to let you know
     
  4. wig

    wig Devotee

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  5. goopp

    goopp Devotee

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    Jan 20, 2008

    When we studied the Civil War last year, my kids loved Shades of Gray. I'm teaching 4th this year and we are finishing our study of the 13 colonies. We are reading The Witch of Blackbird Pond and they are enjoying that book, too.
     
  6. MsMaggs

    MsMaggs Comrade

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    Jan 20, 2008

    Try checking in your teachers editions. Our curriculum is Scott Foresman and at the end of each unit there is a list of read aloud books that relate to each unit we are studying. Just a suggestion!
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jan 20, 2008

    All the Dear America books and videos are appropriate for 5th.
     
  8. noreenk

    noreenk Cohort

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    Jan 21, 2008

    My teammate did Johnny Tremain but I prefer My Brother Sam is Dead because of its length. Another resource that I use to supplement my American Revolution unit are the Liberty's Kids DVDs... they're cartoons, but usually after all the dense reading that we do during the AR unit it's nice for them to see an easy-to-understand, more action-packed version of events. PBS's Liberty! DVDs are a drier, but more historically descriptive, resource, too.
     
  9. jessicalerner

    jessicalerner New Member

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    Jan 28, 2008

    I taught 5th grade and we focused on many of the big eras in American history. I found Patricia Pollaco really helpful. When we did Civil War, we used Pink and Say. Maybe you're looking for a novel, but I really liked using several short stories for different perspective. Kids got really into writing historical fiction, too.
     
  10. tinadog

    tinadog Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2008

    writing

    Thank you so much for your suggestions. How do you go about teaching your students to write historical fiction? I am new at all of this and I'm taking all the help I can get.
     
  11. jessicalerner

    jessicalerner New Member

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    Jan 29, 2008

    I tried to tie reading and writing units together - it works really well for historical fiction. We also had an American history time line (just sentence strips) along the wall. I found the time line really helpful. We labeled major events/eras.
    Anyway, I gathered lots of texts for each era during reading. We made some charts about important events/themes. I also brought people in to talk (my mom came in to talk about the '60s, etc.). The kids got really into the voices from the time, so I liked the narrative texts.
    For writing, we made a chart about characteristics of historical fiction. I think hearing those different voices is what propelled the writing unit. They were soooo excited about it. I let them make picture books when we were done editing. Let me know if you have questions about the writing process in general... I'd be happy to help. :)
     
  12. noreenk

    noreenk Cohort

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    Jan 29, 2008

    My students have done a decent job with letter writing at key points in the book (My Brother Sam is Dead) from the point of view of a specific character. The most effective historical fiction they've done was for the Middle Passage... I think they really connected to the events and were able to capture some great emotions in their writing. To prep them, we read several passages, took notes on our reading, and made a foldable that organized the three parts of the slave trade. Their writing had to focus on one part of the slave trade, so they started by reviewing their foldable and then went back through their reading to find more details. Some didn't quite get the hang of it, so I read aloud some good drafts (surprisingly, my typically low kids really shined on this activity) and that got the ball rolling.
     
  13. tinadog

    tinadog Rookie

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    Jan 30, 2008

    voice

    I'm not sure what you mean by "voices from the time." What texts do you use? Novels? Textbooks? I am struggling with teaching the writing process. We are using writing prompts to prepare for the writing test and several students are experiencing writing blocks. I thought combining history and writing would be motivating but I don't know where to start.
     

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