Highly Qualified

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by Beth2004, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    Apr 18, 2006

    I'm just curious what the requirements are to be highly qualified in your state. There's been a lot of talk on here lately about NCLB and it just seems to me that every state varies greatly in their rules and requirements.
    In Massachusetts if you have a Bachelor degree, have completed an accredited teacher ed. program, and passed all of the content exams for the area you are going to teach (there are 3 for elementary) you are then eligible to be a licensed teacher. Once you have your license you are considered "highly qualified." To remain "highly qualified" and to renew your license, you must obtain a Master degree within 5 years, but again, if you don't do that you will not be able to renew your license and will no longer be a licensed teacher in Mass. So basically, anyone who has met the requirements for a license in Mass is already automatically considered highly qualified.
    What is it like where you live?
     
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  3. TeacherC

    TeacherC Connoisseur

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    Apr 18, 2006

    Beth, I think that here in CT it is exactly the same. Maybe us New Englanders stick together
     
  4. AngelHead

    AngelHead Comrade

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    Apr 18, 2006

    Kentucky is the same, except if you teach Emotional/Behavior Disorders or Middle School. They'll let just about anyone take those jobs for obvious reasons.

    Of all the ridiculousness and poorly executed standards that NCLB has mandated, the highly-qualified teachers part of it is not so bad. I think it makes sense to make teachers become highly qualified. Now if they could only be highly-paid as well (of course, this is NOT part of NCLB)...
     
  5. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    We are very similar in MD. Bachelor's in content area or in ECE or ELEM, depending on your placement. Master's within a certain number of years, and continual renewal of certificates, with credits as needed. Also, to be licensed, you must pass all portions that are relevant of the NTE (or at least, that's how it used to be - I haven't heard anything about the NTE in a long time...does it still exist?)
     
  6. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    In California, to be highly qualified, you must have a bachelor's degree, a teaching credential (an internship credential counts), and prove subject matter competency by completing an approved subject matter program or by passing the appropriate tests.
     
  7. Lesley

    Lesley Habitué

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    Apr 18, 2006

    In Indiana for highly qualified as a veteran elementary teacher you have to have a valid license in the area you teach AND one (1) of the three 1. pass Praxis II, 2. Pass NTE 3. earn 100 points on the state rubric. There are different requirements for special ed, new teachers, MS and HS teachers.
     
  8. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Louisiana up to 5th grade - degree, license, and pass the appropriate parts of the Praxis. For the majority of us, it was just a matter of sitting down, finding scores, and signing the paper.
     
  9. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    Apr 18, 2006

    It seems as though most of us have the same types of requirements to be highly qualified. Does everyone need to pass the state tests in order to be licensed, or is that something that comes later to become highly qualified?
     
  10. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    In California, the only required test is CBEST, which is a basic 3Rs test required for the crednetial. The other tests are optional in the sense that if you prove subject matter competence by completing an approved subject matter program you don't have to take the tests. But if you haven't completed an approved subject matter program, you can still prove subject matter competence by passing the tests.
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 18, 2006

    Not quite, Malcolm: anyone in California who wants a multiple subject credential HAS to pass CSET-MS: there hasn't been a multiple subject waiver since 2003. For those who aren't Californians, CSET-MS covers much of the same ground as Praxis II subject area exams for elementary school, though with somewhat different emphases that reflect California curriculum. I think CSET-MS is a little more challenging than the old MSAT (a Praxis II) in terms of content but less daunting overall because the format lets you spread the test out a bit and focus on just two or three of the seven domains at a time.
     
  12. Julie

    Julie Rookie

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    In NC, all you have to do is have your license, pass the praxis and renew your license every 6 years. NC seems to prefer National Boards over a Masters, but neither of those is required.
     
  13. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Yep, forgot about MS... AFAIK, legally, it is still possible to do MS without CSET if your major was liberal arts, but it doesn't seem like CTC has been granting waivers. And most folks going for MS aren't liberal arts majors anyway, so have to take CSET.
     
  14. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Apr 18, 2006

    I'm also in Kentucky . . . and I teach middle school. And, no, they don't let "just about anyone" take those jobs--at least not at our school! :confused:

    You have to have a bachelor's degree with teaching certification in either one or two areas. (I have one area because I'm an "old-timer" who went through the education program when certificates were K-8 or 9-12. Because our school is departmentalized, I teach middle school English with my 9-12 English certification.) You have to have a masters or rank II certification within 10 years of completing your internship. And then there are the continuing credits after the MA/ranking route. You must also pass the Praxis (or NTE for the old folks) for your area. Oh, yes, and you must complete a one-year internship.

    We all had to go through a qualifications survey a couple of years ago. Most of us had no problems because most of us were teaching within our major--either a "double" middle school program or a single-subject secondary program. Things got a bit trickier with those who were teaching middle school with an ELEMENTARY degree. However, most of those folks had enough years experience in that grade/subject to qualify on that anyway. We only had ONE teacher not qualify . . . and she was on emergency certification, so she was still taking classes, and is now highly qualified.
     
  15. TXTeacher4

    TXTeacher4 Companion

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    Apr 20, 2006

    In Texas you must have a bachelors degree, complete an accredited teacher ed program, and pass the state exams. We do not have to obtain a masters to continue our career. That seems a little harsh to me. Many people choose to, but I don't think it should be a requirement.
     

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