High School Summer Reading

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by TeacherSandra, Jun 13, 2011.

  1. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    Jun 13, 2011

    I thought every school required it...but, my son's school didn't make any reading a requirement. What should I do...require he read at least 2 this summer for the heck of it (yeah; I know he'll hate my idea!!). Any suggestions?
     
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  3. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jun 13, 2011

    Our district "requires" it but doesn't enforce it. There is a lot of great YA stuff out there. I would have him pick two books completely of his own choosing if you're going to have him read.

    Tell us about about what he likes and his reading level, and we can probably give you some good suggestions. :)
     
  4. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    Jun 13, 2011

    Sandra, what year is he and what subjects do you think he'd most benefit from? I assign summer reading as do many of my colleagues. There are a ton of great choices.
     
  5. StudentTeach

    StudentTeach Comrade

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    Jun 13, 2011

    I would say, "summer is a great time to read for pleasure and pick books that you like. We should make some summer reading goals together. Let's go to Barnes and Noble and browse around!" Something like that ;) I would make goals along with him to show that you have reading as a priority as well. You can keep track on GoodReads.com and make it fun.
     
  6. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    Jun 13, 2011

    Starting an unofficial family book club could be fun. I would have hated being forced to read (if I wasn't already a voracious reader), so making it an event might help your idea go over more smoothly. You could plan to discuss certain chapters over dinner.
     
  7. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    Jun 14, 2011

    He will be a junior in the fall. He's an excellent student and excels in Math - all As in all classes. English is not his favorite course, but he pulls in a high A nevertheless. :)
    I just think summer reading should be the norm. But, like a few have said...I don't want to "make" him do it if it's not required and I don't want to be battling over it either.
    Any suggestions though? :)
     
  8. KateL

    KateL Habitué

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    Jun 14, 2011

    I always hated the required reading books. (Profiles in Courage = yuck!) I read plenty on my own anyway. Just take him to the library and have him pick out a few books. Ask the librarian to help. English classes tend to be heavy on the fiction, so if he'd rather read non-fiction, please let him. Books about how to choose a career or how to get into college might be particularly relevant.
     
  9. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2011

    Sandra, my juniors read works of history that are fun and offer an alternative view of something they think they know.

    This year, they're reading The Poisoner's Handbook by Deborah Blum (it's about the NY Medical Examiner's Office and how they developed the chemistry of forensic science! And each chapter talks about a different poison - lots of true crime in that one). They're also reading Paul Revere's Ride by David Hackett Fischer.

    But there are a ton of great books in history that read quickly and contain themes interesting to 16 year old boys. Edmund Morris's first volume on TR (The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt) is really interesting. My students liked Five Points, and if you're anywhere near NYC it's especially interesting.

    There's a great book on slavery called Soul by Soul. It's about the New Orleans slave market and my students loved the chapter they read. Your son sounds sharp as a tack so he might like it, too.

    I recently read The Warmth of Other Suns, about the Great Migration. It's good, but he could stop about 100 pages before the end and miss nothing.

    What I like for summer reading are books that read like a story but tell you something important. And all the books above would be useful if he's in US or AP US history next year. Or, for that matter, American lit.
     
  10. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Jun 14, 2011

    My district does not have a summer reading requirement. I wish they did though.
     
  11. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    Jun 14, 2011

    Thank you, Katharine. I'm going to mention going to the library or the bookstore this week. :)

    Thanks so much everyone! :love:
     
  12. eddygirl

    eddygirl Companion

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    Jun 14, 2011

    How about some books that are the basis for his favorite movies? My guys will often refer to movies in class, and my reply is usually, "Yeah, but you should read the book. It SO much better than the film version." It has prompted many of them to pick up a book to look for comparisons.
     

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