High-needs student

Discussion in 'General Education' started by curiouslystrong, Sep 25, 2014.

  1. curiouslystrong

    curiouslystrong Companion

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    Sep 25, 2014

    I have a 6th grade student I'm not quite sure how to deal with. Based on last year's test scores he is in the 5th percentile for reading and in the 2nd percentile for language skills. He doesn't have much sense of spelling (like today he asked me how to spell "draw" and "where," and he's asked how to spell other very, very basic words before, as well) and writing things by hand seems to be a pretty laborious process. He doesn't have an IEP, as we're a private school, though he does have an IECP (which, among other things, calls for a modified grading scale). I believe he only got the plan last year, though, as his parents just thought he would grow out of his academic issues, and I've been told not to expect much/any help from home with this student.

    I'm trying to differentiate things for him, but while I don't feel comfortable setting my current expectations any lower for a sixth grade student, I also think I may be giving him things at too high of a level. For example, for vocabulary, I have four different, leveled vocabulary lists for a class of nine students. His list consists of third grade words. I've also scaled his vocabulary packet waaaaaay back compared to the other kids and heavily modified his quiz (I gave him definitions to match to five of his words and synonyms to match to the other five, and I gave him the test orally). Part of the problem is that about 75% of the time, he doesn't complete any work unless someone is standing right next to him, prompting him to complete it. But some things he just doesn't know, or simply can't articulate at all; he got a score of 3/10 on his vocabulary quiz, for example, though I'd personally reviewed all his words with him beforehand.

    Socially, he also has some issues. At recess he literally does nothing but walk around, alone, with a spaced-out look on his face. He did this last year, too. If he's put in a group, he doesn't interact with anyone else, even though his partners are usually trying to engage with him, and he's always asking to do things alone when I have them pair up. Sometimes when I'm one-on-one with him, he'll make funny noises (like snorting or fart noises) - though it's clear he's not doing it to be rude or as a joke.

    Any ideas? I honestly think he needs someone with him one-on-one constantly, as that's the only way he gets work done and consistently actively engages with material...but that's not happening. I try to get with him one-on-one as often as possible, but even in a class that small, it's nowhere near possible - especially as 4 out of the 9 have IECPS and 7 out of 9 are part of our Title I program; he's by no means my only high-needs student in that class. How can I help him without spending all my time with him?
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Sep 25, 2014

    From the tone of your post, I am guessing that there is no hope for an IEP? I am afraid that I am not well versed in the SPED laws in your state.
     
  4. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 26, 2014

    It's a private school.

    Per Child Find regs, the school district he lives in must evaluate him.

    Beyond that, it's up to the district what they'll provide to a child who was unilaterally placed out of district.
     
  5. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 26, 2014

    I would definitely talk to your local public district and ask them to evaluate him.
     
  6. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Sep 26, 2014

    I teach in a private school, and we frequently have students evaluated by our public school district. They can also then tell us what services the child would receive if they attended the public school. At this point, parents occasionally choose to send their children there where the have access to more of those resources. If not, the joint services team then helps us write an ISP for the child.

    I think you need to have a conference with the parents to discuss the extent of the child's difficulties and get them on board to move forward with an evaluation. Having more information will help you know what to try going forward.
     
  7. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Sep 26, 2014

    I don't think an evaluation can be done without parents' permission. Find out what the process is, then talk to the parents, tell them what you've told us, and ask if the behavior is the same at home (they'll likely say yes), then you can get their permission to evaluate. Emphasize that you want to see their child succeed but he is really struggling right now and needs lots more support than you can provide.
     
  8. curiouslystrong

    curiouslystrong Companion

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    Sep 26, 2014

    Thanks everyone - he does already have an ICEP (Individual Catholic Education Plan); he was first evaluated for it last year. He is pulled out to meet with our Title I instructor twice per week (once for math, once for reading) and he is also pulled once per week for counseling. Otherwise, modifications include extra time for tests/quizzes, yes/no questions, taking things one concept at a time, incorporating pictures (he's a visual learner). He also has a modified grading scale that is implemented when calculating his final grade.

    The main problem for me is that even when I am using his ICEP to make modifications, it still doesn't solve the problem that he generally doesn't do work unless someone is one-on-one with him, and I can't be one-on-one with him during the whole class. His parents have also repeatedly been informed/met with and do not think he needs more support/services. Apparently this student has an older brother who had similar issues academically, but who turned things around once he got to middle school (or maybe it was high school) or so; they seem to think that the same thing will happen here, and will not be told otherwise.
     
  9. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    Sep 26, 2014

    May be invite parents to observe him in class?
     
  10. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Sep 26, 2014

    How do the parents respond to the poor grades he is receiving? What will happen in your school if he does not acquire the necessary skills required for promotion? Does he get passed along?
     
  11. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 27, 2014

    An evaluation cannot be done without parental permission or court order i.e. the school filing for due process and succeeding.

    A screening can always be done, however, it must be under certain circumstances.

    §300.302 Screening for instructional purposes is not evaluation.
    The screening of a student by a teacher or specialist to determine appropriate instructional strategies for curriculum implementation shall not be considered to be an evaluation for eligibility for special education and related services.

    (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1414(a)(1)(E))

    Were any standardized psychoeducational evaluations used as part of forming this ICEP?

    It sounds like as part of the ICEP, the student's grades are inflated (through the modification of the grading scale)
     
  12. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Sep 27, 2014

    That's what I figured (inflated grades).

    Many parents (I hesitate to say "most" but that's what my experience has actually shown me) are far more concerned about grades than they are about actual learning.

    This is why modified grading Pi$$es me off. Unless that child is not working towards an actual high school diploma. If he will be getting a certificate of attendance or such, then fine. But why lie and say the kid is learning the standards required by the state just so you can pass him along? So he and his parents can feel good about themselves? It is a ridiculous practice.
     

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