High Kids Left Behind?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by YoungTeacherGuy, May 26, 2019.

  1. CherryOak

    CherryOak Companion

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    May 27, 2019

    Ours are pulled a small amount of time. The GT co-teaches some. But, I'm watching this strand because I see the same thing in our scores. We're currently told to not teach ahead, but instead go deeper and do more problem solving. I debate about that. I am not sure what I think of it. I get it.....but then also find the students excited by advanced concepts and just can't help but teach them some.
     
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  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    May 27, 2019

    I am also sure that your groupings allowed for movement between groups when necessary such as the low reader who all of a sudden has it click and can read levels higher in a short amount of time.
     
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  3. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    May 27, 2019

    I'm making sure that all of what I do ensures that all levels are hit. I think it's perfectly possible to ensure all levels are hit in a classroom, but it just takes constant reflection and learning on the teacher's part to do so:

    Mathematically: I work to try to either ensure that tasks I give are very low-floor, high-ceiling activities (Jo Boaler / Youcubed has a ton of those), so that all students are engaging with the topic, but it allows many students to dive incredibly deep into it. Also, I provide a variety of enrichment opportunities, from extension math menus I created for each report card strand (pushes kids deeper with grade-level content...problem solving that even I had trouble solving my first time! :)), to even just pushing them deeper with a particular concept -- i.e. taking what they know about the area formula for a rectangle, and then seeing if they can figure out the area formula for other shapes using that information.

    Writing: Easy to differentiate here, and I challenge them to use their favorite books to help them a lot, too. I'm either having higher-level conversations with those higher kids - i.e. how to write a more creative introduction/conclusion, or advanced sentence structure - or looking at skills they'd likely learn down the line (i.e. how to, in an opinion piece, ensure that the other side is addressed but brought back to your position)

    Reading: The beauty of driving a culture of wild readers is that that in itself auto-differentiates. If I'm helping them build their reading identity in a strong fashion, then they're all developing, no matter what level they're at. But beyond that, I can look at more Greek/Latin roots with those kids who may have other skills down well, or have more conversations when conferring that relate to author purpose or whatnot. Connecting it to writing, as well.
     
  4. stargirl

    stargirl Companion

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    May 27, 2019

    Yes, of course. We had students moving to higher classes when warranted. On occasion, students who truly needed it, would move to a lower level class. The "lower" level class was still taught grade level curriculum. But with extra support and reinforcement as needed. The kids in these classes really soared. And the higher level classes were easily able to do a lot of extensions.
    Now, teachers are running on a never ending treadmill, preparing 3 or 4 different mini lessons for each class. That's in addition to the the introductory whole group lesson, as well as planning for independent activities for students to work on while we meet with the other groups. It is extremely stressful and just doesn't work. Their independent work is terrible. They simply don't get enough direct instruction or modeling to be successful on their own. The quality of their work has gone way down. They need more teacher guidance.
     
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  5. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    May 27, 2019

    Stargirl, I'm with you on this. I think people confuse the old tracking of the past where the low kids never advanced and often had teachers that didn't believe they could improve.
     
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  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    May 27, 2019

    Once again:
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    May 27, 2019

    My school offers an accelerated math program at grades 4-6. It's similar to math intervention for the lowest performing students, except that we are reaching the opposite end of the spectrum. Students go through three rounds of assessment to determine if they qualify for the program. This year, only four students in my grade-level (out of roughly 120 students) qualified for the program. We probably had six students in the intervention program. In both cases, it's a small group pull-out program for students who need something different than what is being provided in the regular classroom. At the lower grades (K-3), teachers just differentiate within the classroom, and at the higher grades (7+), there is some form of ability-grouping.
     
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