Here’s how I would fix urban public schools

Discussion in 'General Education' started by AlwaysAttend, Dec 16, 2017.

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  1. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Since the other thread is closed, here’s how I would fix urban public schools.


    1. Close all for profit charter schools. Educating students in and of itself shouldn’t be a business venture.


    2. Close any charter school that does not improve upon nearest comparable school in testing performance (only works if all students are required to take the test).


    3. Have 1 social worker for every 100 kids and require group therapy as a class that meets at least once a week and individual counseling for students in need. Trauma is something we need to work proactively to deal with.


    4. As much as many seem to hate it, schools need to invest in actual curriculum assembled by experts, not things purchased off of teachers pay teachers and worksheets from mathdrills.com. Teachers need a framework and can break off from there.


    5. Teachers need to start reading research more. Too many rely on the poor pd they receive. Even grad school doesn’t do a great job with this.


    6. Teachers must be incentivized to work in the toughest schools and the toughest subjects. The highest paid teachers should be math, science, and highly trained reading intervention teachers working with the toughest populations. I would not lump hard to staff positions like SPED and ESL into this because they would become patronage positions.


    7. School days need to be longer in areas where the population is working poor. Teacher pay should be commiserate with the extra hours. During this time, any homework assigned should be completed and students should be fed 4 times. Breakfast, snack, lunch, snack. Specials and electives should also be available during this schedule.


    8. Medical professionals need to be brought in quarterly and students should receive individualized health treatment plans. Any sign of abuse or lack of health plan follow through should be referred immediately to social worker.


    9. Students should be tested frequently for academic growth and advanced based on growth not age.


    10. Parents collecting government benefits while not working must volunteer a certain number of hours per week in the school. These volunteers would lessen the financial cost of before/after care, and lunch/recess coverage, and office staff/hall monitors. If they act out of line because they don’t possess the skills necessary to function in society, they must attend training to correct this or risk losing their benefits and eventually children. Those with criminal history will need to volunteer in community beautification programs instead.


    11. School leaders should be held accountable by annual votes of confidence and should be replaced if they fail to maintain a certain percentage between staff and the community.


    I could think of others but that’s a decent start.


    You may ask how I’m planning to pay for these things. Money is gonna have to come from somewhere and I start with existing government programs like Medicaid and SNAP. School funding for meals should come directly from snap since schools would now be feeding students all but 1 meal per day. Scale cost of food purchases would be significantly lowered and some abuse of the system would be curtailed. Medicaid should be paying for their health, including mental health, so that’s a good place to begin.


    Between those and current funding, we probably get a significant amount paid for. Obviously, literal budget estimates would need to be made.
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I agree with many of these points. Speaking from personal experience, I'm not sure how many of them will work without extreme parent and community buy-in.

    My school is in an inner-city area classified as "extreme poverty". It's almost entirely brown and black, with a large population of ELL students and students with special needs (many students with dual designations). We receive a lot of additional money as part of a special grant; when I say "a lot", I mean A LOT. We have numerous wraparound services, including a health center staffed by a PA or NP in addition to our regular school nurse's office, several community groups with "classrooms" on campus to provide additional support for students in virtually every area from homework support to funding for families' utility bills and groceries to clothing to college guidance to school supplies to snacks to pregnancy tests. We have an extended day and several after-school programs that go two to three hours beyond dismissal time. Students are assessed in ELA and math monthly using a program called Evaluate. We provide school supplies to all students at the beginning of the year. We provide free breakfast for everyone and lunch for students who qualify for FRL (which is nearly 100%). We have numerous specialists and strategists who are highly trained and skilled in specific areas like ELL, math, ELA, special ed, etc. We have on-site social workers and school psychologists, plus a decently-sized counseling staff. We have access to far more technology than we need.

    First of all, many students don't give two poops about the things they are given. Within one day, all those brand new highlighters and binders and agendas and pens and composition notebooks are broken and strewn around the quad. The shoes and eyeglasses they are given are left on the ground outside the gym. The breakfasts they are given go directly into the trash cans. That's tough to see.

    Even with everything we have and do for our students, our scores, while improving, leave much to be desired. Our students come to us far behind the curve both academically and socially. It's challenging to bring them up to grade level when they are so far behind and when most of the students in their classes have fairly severe behavior problems. While the behavior issues aren't as bad as I've seen at other schools, they are pervasive and very hard to tackle even for seasoned, effective teachers.

    One thing we don't have is a ton of seasoned, effective teacher, though, and that is part of our problem. In spite of the extra money we get for teaching on an extended day, we are a revolving door for new teachers and TFA people. Many folks come to my school in order to get their foot in the door, "do their time", and leave for an easier gig as soon as they have a chance.

    We have a lot of issues with parents who are unreachable or combative or just basically unsupportive. Not all parents, of course, but enough that it really deforms the home-school-community circle. I talked to a parent the other day about a relatively innocuous issue (a lost textbook), and the parent said "F you" to me (but not abbreviated) and told me that she would be hiring an attorney. An attorney! Because her kid lost a book! There's a weird sense of entitlement and extreme anger that I've seen among both parents and students. It seems to be anger at The System, but it sometimes gets directed specifically at me or my colleagues. While I understand it on an intellectual level, it sucks on an emotional level, especially when we are working our butts off to help our kids be successful.
     
  4. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Buy in is always key.
     
  5. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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  6. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Thanks for this thoughtful post. Why would the other thread get shut down? Here's my reply to Belch:
    I don't know why the conversation we were having about Detroit schools was shut down, but I wanted to tell you that the school we were visiting in Japan was a private English immersion school. The children were darling, and my students formed long term relationships with their Japanese classmates. We all had home stays and got a profound glimpse of Japanese culture and hospitality.

    I felt bad that I just posted the negative aspects of the visit, but it was in response to your suggestion that kids learn from caring for their school. In my mind, this was not a successful practice.

    This summer my wife and I are going back to visit my hosts, since I also formed a long lasting relationship with my host.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2017
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  7. Belch

    Belch Companion

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    I'm glad to hear that your trip wasn't entirely bad. For what it's worth, corporal punishment is illegal in Japan, and that teacher you mentioned should have been fired, and perhaps charged with a crime if that had been reported to the police. In my 20 years teaching, I have never seen a teacher be violent with a student.

    The bit about cleaning schools is just one aspect of what I consider to be an attempt to teach students how to live in a civil society. We have to clean up after ourselves because we have to be courteous of others.

    I'll admit that students aren't all that happy cleaning their school, but it teaches them an important life lesson. We have to be respectful of others. If one student makes a mess, everybody who sees that student making a mess knows that somebody they know and respect is going to have to clean it up.

    While AlwaysAttend's ideas sound good, none of them address the concept of an incentive to living in a civil society. That key ingredient of being respectful of others is not addressed. How will students learn that they must respect others if they are not taught to respect others?

    A lot of the methods we use here have dual purposes, and one of those is cleaning our schools. One obvious reason is that it saves money. The much more important reason is to learn that our behavior has consequences.

    This idea of living with each other and respecting each other, no matter who the other is, is vital to understanding why our cities are clean(ish), why we are polite to others, and our safe country.
     
  8. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I love these ideas! The main thing that needs to happen in order for full buy-in to happen is that the schools, the families, and the greater community must realize they are all interconnected spheres of influence. If one party fails to support the other two, the model falls apart.
     
  9. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I can’t fix society. I can fix a school.
     
  10. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    I'm married to a Japanese woman and have been to Japan numerous times.

    Different areas of Japan tend to vary, so I wouldn't warn you against taking your experience as definitive. You've seen one school (an atypical English immersion school) and are generalizing that across all Japan. In general, having the students clean the school is effective. While corporal punishment is illegal, it does happen sometimes. It used to be much more prevalent.

    (By the way, do you know how often it happens legally in the US?)

    It sounds like there was some lack of preparation culturally on both sides, which is unfortunate.
     
  11. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Something I think would be interesting to try with urban areas is implementing more boarding schools where the students basically live at the school. It would offer a lot more control of home and school culture since both of those have huge effects on student lives and learning.
     
  12. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    St. Benedicts Prep in Newark, NJ does this in rare situations. I definitely think it could work, but I’d worry about abuse that could occur on a larger scale project. This would already be a population susceptible to abuse.

    Maybe starting with a smaller population would be the way the way to go. Homeless students.

    Either way, I’d worry about it becoming a juvenile detention type place where students and staff are perpetually in danger.
     
  13. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Before I started teaching, I volunteered at a private residential school that was almost exclusively orphans and foster children who would have otherwise been in group homes. It was AMAZING. These kids knew they had an opportunity and they took it.
     
  14. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Good ideas, but the racial factors must be addressed. We have a racist system that teaches from a Eurocentric perspective, no Black people, inventors, mathematicians etc are acknowledged on the equal level they should be with white scholars.

    So the curriculum is problem number 1. Schools ignore the very essence of Black humanity, Black creativity, Black genius..and trust me these kids know it! They feel excluded, ignored, degraded and that's from the curriculum.

    Then factor in the fact that people have preconceived notions about Black kids, and those stereotypes, biases, or whatever affect the way all adults in the schools interact with kids.
    This world thinks lowly of Black kids, and again, they know it, they sense it, and they will react back to the negative attitudes the world throws at them.
    They have to be tough, or appear tough, because no one, no one advocates nor listens to Black kids.
    This system is not set up for black kids. It strangles their natural cultural ideals and creativity.
    Now, I am not attacking individual teachers or individual admins, I am talking about a system that has already labeled black kids as more violent, and less intelligent. And they know it. They are frustrated and surviving the best way they can.
    Then, indeed, home lives are chaotic, but people have to examine why. It's often systematic torture such as police brutality, mass incarceration whereas a black person faces longer prison sentences for the exact same crime as a white person. That has completely destroyed black communities. Racist criminal justice sentences.
    Then consider loan discrimination, health care discrimination, real estate racism, red lining, gentrification, all types of issues that keep urban areas depleted. It's called urban decay and it's a result of environmental racism.
    People are trapped in poverty, and that's not natural.
    It's not about the parents education either. College educated Blacks are hired at a lesser rate than whites with a high school diploma. So again, you have people being trapped in all types of torture. Lack of resources will always correlate with high crime.
    Schools are a reflection of the racism and chaos urban kids deal with. Schools are not the exception, they are a apart of the problem.
    So we have to care about and reach the souls of black kids in order for anything else to ever work.
    I no longer teach, and yes I am Black, and I started an African Centered Education Program to help introduce Black kids to their African heritage and other topics of discussion. I am a school volunteer..
    Basically, black history is American history, black history is world history. February should not be the only month, black history should be taught all year. It should 100 percent be incorporated into every subject, on every grade level.

    A people's history has to be respected. From reading the other thread, Always Attend you are 100%on point!!!

    I can type on this forever. I am an advocate for Black kids, I believe in them, what's happening to them is not their fault and in many cases it's bigger than their parents as well.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2017
  15. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I saw a study from France of boarding schools for impoverished kids. The results were, sadly, that only some kids succeeded in the system. Namely those that were already resisitant to poverty around them who recognized the opportunity.
     
  16. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I was wondering when the standard PC nonsense would come up.
     
  17. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    I would agree that boarding schools would probably not work. Plus it looks like the government taking kids away from their parents. It might be a lot cheaper to support the parents with resources to allow for a less stressful childhood for poor kids and a richer neighborhood school curriculum.
     
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  18. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Call me old-fashioned, but I think a job of society is to support the family. If a family is struggling, should society's first response be to axe the family or help the family?
     
  19. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    I was wondering when the thread would be locked.
     
  20. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Wow.
     
  21. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    Perhaps there's a reason it's "standard"?

    I'm not convinced of any of webmistress' points, but that was a remarkably disrespectful dismissal of her post.
     
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  22. Belch

    Belch Companion

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    I certainly don't shy away from discussing race when it is relevant to the subject matter being taught, but how is race relevant to inventors, creativity, genius or mathematicians?
     
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  23. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I really, REALLY don't want to see this thread locked. Let's keep the flow of ideas going without insulting one another.
     
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  24. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    It’s not. However, when you have no other argument, then you have to make it seem like race plays a factor. Yes, slavery happened in this country and racism was rampant until the Civil Rights movement. However, the wrongs made against a group of people in the distant past can’t be used as an excuse for poor performance indefinitely. Eventually, you have to move on and decide to change your life. YOU have to be the change in your life. For example, the Japanese were put into internment camps during WW2 and many lost their homes and livelihoods. Are the Japanese still making excuses years after the fact for not doing well? The same thing can be said for the Jewish people, who have been persecuted for thousands of years by almost every single country at some point. Are they making excuses for not doing well? Oh wait, the vast majority of Nobel Peace Price winners are people of Jewish descent. The same can be said for many other races of people.

    You can’t keep using wrongs against your ANCESTORS for the problems in your life today.
     
  25. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    What insults were thrown? I just reread through the entire thread and can’t find any.
     
  26. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    As someone who is not from the US and who doesn't seem terribly familiar with American culture, you sure do have a lot to say about race relations in the United States. I find this very curious.
     
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  27. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    [​IMG]
     
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  28. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Lol, Caesar753, you’re awesome! Your sass is great! :)

    Please provide a rebuttal since you disagree!
     
  29. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    And this is how you and most other teachers would respond to their Black students who is trying to explain something about their lives, their families, their neighborhoods to you. Their fears, their hopes and dreams, their ideas, their experiences, their blood and tears gets dismissed as "excuses" for their innate inferiority. Bringing up other groups has nothing to do with Black people. Black people have the most unique history and present day status as any other group could ever imagine.

    Exactly my point. This is why some Black kids don't try, they don't bother, they shut down...because everyone already has their minds made up about them. Everyone has already labeled them and their entire race as inferior, and that again goes back to my original post.

    All educators, and all of society actually, needs to be honest regarding what it truly thinks and promotes about intelligence among the races. To say that slavery is over, well actually, nope, the exact same beliefs from slavery and Jim Crow still exists in every classroom in the US today. The ideology of slavery lives on 100%, and thus, these are the results of that poison.

    Everything you typed to me, will show in your actions and in your responses to Black kids. They know this! You cannot fool them.
    You cannot pretend that you think the races are equal, when in reality, you think Blacks are inferior. They will pick up on this! The problem is not them, they are innocent children, remember.

    No less innocent than white kids dealing with opioid abuses. No less innocent than Asian kids dealing with their cultural issues because let's be honest, all races/cultures has huge problems. I as a Black woman do not envy any other race, believe it or not. Your issues are just covered up better, but they are definitely there.

    The problem is a country that is built and based on lies by continuing to demand silence, or beat silence into historically oppressed people. The very people who built this country, built the New World on their backs for free. Yet, this country wants to keep that true history white-washed or down right hidden.

    Black people built the United States, and Black children, actually all children should know that. Every teacher should know the difference between the impact immigrants had, vs Black people forced here and certainly the Natives who were anhiliated.

    When I volunteer in a "failing" middle school and teach the kids about ancient African history, Juneteenth, Hurricane Katrina racism, police brutality, stereotypes etc etc.
    And these kids are engaged, they are smart, and when I request that they go watch a documentary or go to a specific website and research, they do it! Why? Because there is a real purpose to what I tell them to do.

    The system has given poor Black kids no purpose, no reason to even bother. Once people start to view them as human beings, and then go in and form a rapport with them...they absolutely will be great. But again, why should they even bother when so many educators, and society in general, thinks so little of them? They shouldnt have to prove anything to people who buy into white supremacy.

    They are human beings! It is unfortunate that Black schools were closed during integration, and that Black people never continued on with educating our own kids separate from white society that thinks so little of them. That is the only way, truly. And that's why Black Homeschooling is on the rise, and these Black homeschooled kids are geniuses, graduating college at ages 11 and 12, starting businesses, making inventions and just excelling beyond whites and Asians they are always compared to.

    Check into the rise of Black homeschooling and why those kids perform so high. This would provide more insight into what's wrong with an education system that never wanted to integrate nor educate Black people anyway.
    ((Private schools rose up after segregation ended. So this tells you, that everything happening today, every charter, private school is absolutely based on race.)) If this country was built on slavery, theft, lies, rape & built on genocide of the Natives, then that is the foundation of everything about this country today.
    And other countries as well. That history cannot be erased
     
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  30. Belch

    Belch Companion

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    It sounds as if you aren't interested in education, so much as making blacks feel as if they are the victims of abuse.

    Every race has their history of abuse, but I promise you, you aren't going to get from A to B by telling your black students that they are unfortunate victims. You will merely goad them into anger, hostility, resentment, and ultimately violence, which merely perpetuates the stereotype you seem to disagree with on one hand, while fomenting with the other.

    Sorry, but your ideas on racial relations are not helpful.
     
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  31. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Just as with profmath, reflect on how you would respond if a Black student told you they were the victim of a racist incident. How would you respond? Don't answer for me but for yourself.

    Such incidents are happening all day, every day, many of these racist incidents are on video tape for everyone to see. They are constantly reported and documented.

    As these Black kids across the nation report their incidents of racial abuse, the responses from admins and teachers is like what you have done above, to completely dismiss the issue, bring in unrelated distractions, and put the blame on the victim.

    I'm too old for that to work on me, but kids' concerns should never be dismissed or distorted. Is anyone listening to Black students? Does anyone truly care? I cannot imagine how many times Black kids' reports of abuse, any abuse, is not taken seriously. If you don't respect a people's history and culture, then you don't respect those people, period.

    I just emailed 4 Assistant principals and a principal about racist harassment happening to Black students at their school. Parents report it, students report it, and nothing happens. My email box should be interesting in the morning.
    I asked them to explain the concrete steps they plan to take to make sure that not only are Black kids' Civil Rights protected, but that their Human Rights are protected.
     
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  32. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Black people built the United States? Our history classes must have been different. Sure, they played an integral part in its development, but they did not and are the sole reason this country exists. Every race has experienced atrocities. Blacks are no different. Did 99% of the Black population get killed off by European settlers? We’re Blacks hunted down and killed off by the millions by German soldiers? We’re Blacks killed and raped in the hundreds of thousands by Japanese soldiers in the Rape of Nanking?

    Blacks are NOT the only people who have suffered so get off your high horse.

    Blacks were not the only slaves, either.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
  33. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Belch, what do you mean by get from A to B? Are whites and Asians at some amazing status that Black people should aspire to be? What point are you at, that we are not. There is crime, poverty, drugs and dysfunction in every culture.

    The alleged superiority of other cultures cannot exist without having a so-called inferior culture, so that is the only reason you see Black faces on news all the time because the media has to portray one group as inferior because that is the only way whites/Asians in general can feel superior.

    Also, the racial stereotypes date back to the 1600s. There once was no modern day concept of race, and back then Africans were in high regard. Once slavery became based on skin color, then came to the 'modern day invention of race' categories, and along with those categories came the so-called inherent capabilities of each race placing the white race as inherently superior. These stereotypes were put in place by scholars as a way to justify slavery after Africans started converting to Christianity.
     
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  34. Belch

    Belch Companion

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    I mean that you aren't going to get to B by stoking the fires of racial resentment.

    You need to be blind to color, and then maybe you might get there. You decided to take a different route, which I fervently disagree with.

    The rest of your post makes no sense to me. "no modern day concept of race back when Africans were in high regard"? That would not be a modern day concept, and even if I were to concede a small hiccup in your timeline, I'm not really sure when that time was.

    Race is not some modern day invention of race categories, but even if it were, you do seem singularly intent on maintaining that category.
     
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  35. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Our history classes were the same. I had to start researching for myself. Trading Black people and having them work to death for free, absolutely allowed the economy to prosper. Imagine not having to pay millions of people for their labor, because they weren't 'people' they were property, investments. It's how Wall Street began, how Harvard and many other universities were built...and slavery laid the foundation for capitalism that exists today.

    http://maap.columbia.edu/place/22.html

    "The enslavement of African people in the Americas by the nations and peoples of Western Europe, created the economic engine that funded modern capitalism. Therefore it comes as no surprise that most of the major corporations that were founded by Western European and American merchants prior to roughly 100 years ago, benefited directly from slavery."

    http://occupywallstreet.net/story/15-major-corporations-you-never-knew-profited-slavery
     
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  36. Belch

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    Dec 21, 2017

    First, you might want to look into the etymology of 'slave'. The slavs were not black, and furthermore, you would have a hard time finding anybody who is not a descendant of slaves.

    Secondly, slaves are not "free". An owner of slaves has many expenses directly attributable to maintaining the life of another. Food, shelter, clothing, training, etc. etc. etc.

    These expenses are why slaves do not exist in first world countries, although slaves do still exist in several parts of the world, including vast swaths of Africa. We are free to either pay for the upkeep of our own existence through the value of the sweat from our own brows, or we perish through an incapability to provide a tangible mutually agreeable benefit to each other, thus Darwin rises from his grave awarding yet more deserving individuals their ability to perish before passing their genes on to even more unsuccessful offspring.


    Capitalism is why we do not have slaves in the economically advanced countries today. The idea that private property rights do not include the right to owning your own hide is abhorrent to a capitalist. We capitalists believe in private property rights.

    I realize that this sounds political, and to the mods, I do apologize. However, I could not let webmistress's post go unanswered. She did bring the political subject up, and so egregiously in err, that I couldn't help myself.
     
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  37. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    I have taught in public schools for 40 years. I have taught hundreds of black children. I now teach many of their children. Rural south. I went to school when forced integration came along. Still rural south. My classmates black and white from that era succeeded pretty much at the same rate. They did close all the black schools and move them in with us. That was horrible. But they did bring their teachers in with them in my district. One reason we did well was sports. It allowed us to get to know each other. My experience was the similarities FAR outweighed any differences. The things I hear webmistress say about "schools" dealing with black children is far different than my experience. I see crazy and achievement on both sides. No race has a franchise on anti social behavior. My boss (principal ) at one school is a black lady almost my age. We have so much in common it makes our jobs easier. I have her back she has mine. She treats white kids like black kids and vica versa. She does NOT hesitate to let any parent know if the child is messing up. My take is if you have kids growing up in #*$&# holes they will not do so well and be a burden to society. If kids grow up in a nurturing environment they will for the most part do well. Rural areas are usually safer and more transparent. As long as we have grinding poverty and violent urban areas with schools we will have problems. Schools cannot go in those areas and "fix" the children or the environment.
     
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  38. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    To those with Black students, you have to listen to them when they bring up the problems I have in my post. Actually, white and Asian kids need to also know how to respect a Black person's grievances when they mention the effects of Black slavery and anti Black racism on their lives and their family and their community.
    It's time for Black students to stop being dismissed and ignored. They care about slavery, Jim Crow etc, they have had family members lynched based on their race, and again, if these responses to me are any indication of how you guys would respond to a Black student in the midst of racial oppression or crisis they are facing, then it's no wonder Black kids are so angry, they have a right to be
    Do your parts while they are with you. No one can fix the home lives, but you must research the issues that have caused their community problems, just as much as if you were teaching Native Americans you would need to educate yourself on how having their land stolen affects them to this day, just as Black people being stolen from their land affects them.
    I cannot imagine anyone telling Native Americans, oh, though most of your race was slaughtered in genocide, it's over, move on, it had no impact on your life today.
    Those are not appropriate view points and are exactly why oppression lives on. If a group is suffering, it's your duty not only as educators but as human beings to examine what role everyone plays, what role history and the laws play. Everything I have said is just a Google search away.
    There is tons of research, books, documentaries, news articles, online lectures and so on that should be able to clear up any disagreements anyone has with my points.
    If one truly believes in equality they would educate themselves on how the Constitution, laws, government funding, past presidents, wars...nearly everything you can think of has a history, a foundation, a birth...and reading will you show you that these laws are based on the system that this country was built on, and that's slavery and genocide.
     
  39. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    webmistress, you really don't offer a solution. There is nothing anyone can do about what happened in the past. It is done. It was very wrong. We can acknowledge that it happened, but going forward, you offer no solutions.
     
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  40. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    stephen,
    "Schools cannot go in those areas and "fix" the children or the environment."
    True, no one can ever fix the horrible home lives poor kids often suffer in, but it's imperative that people research the reasons why environments are the way they are, and therefore, people won't end up continuing to contribute to the problem.

    Redlining
    "The FHA also explicitly practiced a policy of “redlining” when determining which neighborhoods to approve mortgages in. Redlining is the practice of denying or limiting financial services to certain neighborhoods based on racial or ethnic composition without regard to the residents' qualifications or creditworthiness."

    One of the most heinous of these policies was introduced by the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in 1934, and lasted until 1968. Otherwise celebrated for making homeownership accessible to white people by guaranteeing their loans, the FHA explicitly refused to back loans to black people or even other people who lived near black people. As TNC puts it, "Redlining destroyed the possibility of investment wherever black people lived."

    https://www.theatlantic.com/busines...ng-policy-that-made-your-neighborhood/371439/

    -------------------------
    It's not as simple as being a good parent and having a nurturing environment. Now when these kids grow up in a world where they will be targeted, profiled, harassed by government other authority figures based on their skin color.
    One can be a straight A perfectly behaving student and still get targeted for being Black. And the rest of society justifies the harassment and targeting by using racist stereotypes as the reason why people should fear Black kids, and particularly Black boys...Black boys with hoodies.

    Black kid could be awesome and in the most loving home environment, yet let' be honest, people only see his skin color and thus they feel like he deserves every incident on police brutality, harsh school punishment, 911 calls etc placed against him or her.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
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  41. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    "quote"
    Environmental racism
    is a term used to describe environmental injustice within a racialized context. In some Western nations, environmental racism refers to socially marginalized racial minority communities which are subjected to disproportionate exposure of pollutants, the denial of access to sources of ecological benefits (such as clean air, water, and natural resources), or both.
    Instances of environmental racism can include exposure to toxic waste, flooding, pollution from heavy industrial or natural resource extraction developments, lack of utilities such as clean water, or exclusion from land management and natural resource-related decision making.

    -------
    "During the 1980s, African-Americans began organizing environmental campaigns to avoid poisoning farm workers with pesticides, lead poisoning in inner-city children, the zoning of toxic facilities such as landfills, polluting industrial complexes, and incinerators. In addition, many Americans questioned the placement of large numbers of nuclear waste dumps on Native-American reservations. "

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_racism
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
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