Help!!!!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by MissBee06, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. MissBee06

    MissBee06 Rookie

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    Nov 9, 2006

    I'm a first year teacher and have a class of 22 second graders. I am at a loss on what to do. I work in a charter school and the other teachers and the administrators are great but we are all over worked and exhausted. But more to the point, my class is out of control. I am trying to keep the rules simple, I have a consequences chart that lets then see what will happen if they choose to break a rule. They just will not stop talking!! They are driving me crazy! One of the students talks constantly and if he's not talking he is making noises. I use a behavior chart on their desks with stickers to earn a trip to the prize box, but they don't seem to care. I can't find a way to motivate them to follow the rules. I can admit that I'm not very well organized but I am scared that I will get to the end of the year and still be just as out of control. I am beginning to feel so drained and exhausted that I dread every Monday morning. I need all the advice that anyone can offer me.
     
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  3. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Nov 9, 2006

    There is no one advice fits all that works for any teacher or class. Some things I have used or have observed other postings are:

    Use your teacher stare, body language and convey your msg to a specific problem student or area of the room when useful.

    Stop talking and teaching in the middle of your sentence and refuse to go on until all students are cooperating and looking. If they haven't figured it out you can say a prompt like "I'm waiting" and then not say anything else.

    Does that one student have deeper issues? Some issues like ADHD have poor impulse control. Don't diagnose if you don't already know but do have a parent meeting to ask what they have observed and see if they can be helpful.

    Separate chronic talkers.

    Consider your transition time. If there is a routine and they are engaged and busy, they have less time to talk. Consider more hands on projects that require concentration.

    Have a quiet hand signal that they copy so they know when you need them to calm down and stop.

    Call on them when they talk. This will stop them and others around them. This may not be the most popular advice here because there is a negativity aspect, but it works.

    Consider putting music in your curriculum.

    Consider having a sound cue (and not just a visual one) like clap-clap clap-clap-clap and have them repeat it. It is very effective.

    Hold a community meeting and discuss your frustrations. Ask what they think can be done and what you as a teacher can do to help also. Discuss feelings, productivity, and solutions. This is sometimes helpful, but not always.
     
  4. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Nov 9, 2006

    I would start calling parents in for meetings. This has really helped me this year. Be honest with them and then ask for support at home.
     
  5. txteacher5grade

    txteacher5grade New Member

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    Nov 9, 2006

    I feel your pain. I'm beginning to feel that I've chosen the wrong profession. I appreciate the replies from the other teachers, but I've tried them all. Calling parents only verified for me why these kids act the way they do. I chose this profession because I wanted to make a difference. I saw how my own children were being treated in school by teachers and decided instead of complaining about the problems, I should be part of the solution. Well, now I know what my kids' teachers acted the way they did. Lack of support from our government, lack of support from administrators and fellow teachers, and lack of support from parents. Kids today are raising themselves and it isn't pretty. I cannot seem to reward them enough, constantly "dog treating" them for any good behavior they show. I feel for my students because their parents seem to be idiots - no morals and values, not educated themselves beyond maybe a high school diploma, children raising children, etc.

    By the way, I'm told at my school that if I suggest to a parent that their child is ADHD or ADD, my district then becomes responsible for all medical bills including prescriptions that child may receive as long as they attend school in my district. Therefore, I would suggest leaving the ADHD questions up to your Spec. Ed. department.

    My suggestions to you... Take every recess away from the class until they can sit and be quiet during instruction time. They can practice during recess. If it's not the entire class, have the students who are misbehaving sit out at recess while the others are having fun. Document everything you can on the one student who is causing the most trouble. Get that parent's email address and email them every time he misbehaves even if you end up emailing twenty times a day. Just remember, even if you can get a parent to show up for a parent/teacher conference, they will blame you for their child's misbehavior. They will say that their child has never had trouble before with other teachers, etc. This also applies when you try to talk to your administrator about your problem. They will immediately enroll you in some sort of workshop/training that deal with discipline in the classroom. Unfortunately, these workshops will tell you to do the same things you're already doing. If they're not working, it must be you. :p

    Other than that, pray for a speedy year and hope you get a better group next year. I, in turn, will be praying for you.
     
  6. mhcooley

    mhcooley Companion

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    Nov 9, 2006

    I know how you feel. I had six kids today write letters to their parents explaining what disruptive behaviors they have been doing in my class. I put them in an envelope and they have to get them signed. Of course they did this during their recess. I don't know if this is going to help any but we'll see. I find that I have to be strict. When I say no talking during class, or in line and they do, there are no warnings because they have already been warned. They immediately pull their card. This lowers their conduct grade.
     
  7. IPinPa

    IPinPa Rookie

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    Nov 9, 2006

    a couple of ideas
    * while your talking, walk around the room, when you approach a child that is talking or not paying attention a decreet (sp?) touch on their shoulder lets them know you are aware of the behavior (just try not to break the rhythm of the lesson:)

    *reward and praise frequentlyfor the good stuff going on

    we use a super card program - long story short... each super card has the words responsible, respect, prepared and participate on it when a student is caught doing something good a staff member hands the card to them with the displayed behavior circled, when they get a certain amount of cards they can "cash" them in for a prize It works with our high schoolers. Everyone likes to be acknowledged for something good:)

    * last but not least... switch places with one of the students in the middle of a lesson while they are being shall we say...umm ..non attentive. make sure you disrupt their lesson as they do yours. The kids get a kick out, of it you get to smile and most times you can get the point across.

    hope it helps
    sorry so long:(
     
  8. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

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    Nov 10, 2006

    I'm going to throw out a question - and you can decide if it applies to you or not.
    What are your consequences - and are you IMPLEMENTING them every time? I learned - the hard way - that if I'm not willing to use that consequence EVERY time the misbehavior happens, then I'm inviting the kids to gamble "can I get away with it?" when I hesitate to follow through.

    I sound like I am focusing on the negative - but honestly, I have incentive charts in my class too, and they just are not enough to remind a child that it is not worth it to misbehave in my class. Trust me, they get PLENTY of love, and positive reinforcement. I love these kids to pieces, and they know it! Problem is, until this week, I thought that giving then "just one more chance" was the way to show it. It's not. It only frustrated me when they abused it. and why should I be surprised? I practically TOLD them " why sure! all you need to do is ask, and I'll be happy to let you walk all over me again!"

    The other day, I decided, with the principal on a new system and consequences that I was willing to implement - without hesitation. Sure, kids tested it, but that same day I found notes on my desk that said " Ilove you!" Kids crave the structure - they want to know - do you really care about what i do? " You don't need to say a word. Just show them.
     

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