help

Discussion in 'Montessori Archives' started by lyd, Sep 23, 2006.

  1. lyd

    lyd Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2006

    I have 2 toddlers - a boy and girl - in my all day program at a Montessori school who I am having some typical issues any young toddler would/ could have due to a very long day.
    I need some advice, for I am not yet Montessori certified, on how to approach crying and defiance in a "Montessori" way. I want to make sure that I deal with them both in no other way than what would be accepted under Montessori method. Can any one give me some advice? Thanks so much, would really appreciate it!
     
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  3. Pickles

    Pickles Rookie

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    Sep 25, 2006

    It would be helpful if you give one or more specific examples.

    My school gives a training called Redirecting Children's Behavior that stems from the philosophies of Rudolf Dreikurs. So far it's been very helpful.
     
  4. lyd

    lyd Rookie

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    Sep 25, 2006

    Thank you Pickles. Example for girl - after nap (around 3:00) does not listen, goes from one activity (work) to the next w/out finishing or putting away. She In reference to listening - she just disregards any directions or instructions. She leaves the snack table with her food and when told that the table is where we eat, therefore she must be done, she throws a short tantrum and runs from us.
    Example for boy (about 1.5 yrs) - as soon as he is done his after nap snack he begins to talk about his mom and day, wanting to go home. He usually begins to cry and does not stop. It is esp. a problem when he sees his older brother in the hall (older brother usually runs to hall when hears younger brother crying) - separating them after this is a HUGE problem.
    I understand that 8:00 am to 4:30/ 6:00 pm is a long day for any toddler. Hopefully with this new info. some one can help me with my dilemma. Hope this helps Pickles
     
  5. lyd

    lyd Rookie

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    Sep 25, 2006

    Pickles - response for you

    Pickles. Sorry my response for you went under my post by accident. I did something wrong. Anyway the extra info you asked for is under my first post as a reply. Hope i didn't make it too confusing. Thanks again.
     
  6. Pickles

    Pickles Rookie

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    Sep 25, 2006

    I also find the very young ones challenging. They are not quite conscious yet, and so talking doesn't really work. I try (with all the kids) to say something just once. If they don't listen, gently guide them or point to the object waiting patiently. With these super-little ones establishing the trusting, loving connection is important. So whatever direction you give, make it with an open heart. If they are having a meltdown, see their way - "yes, I understand this makes you sad." Especially in these first weeks of school. You really have to establish that connection so they are comforted by you rather than see you as the bad guy.

    I don't know if this helps. I've only had one class in Redirecting Children's Behavior so I'm not an expert on it yet!
     

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