Help!

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Shiloh17, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. Shiloh17

    Shiloh17 Companion

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    Sep 10, 2013

    I need some tactics on dealing with screaming, crying children when parents drop off. One student had a huge tantrum and kicked the door. She even tried to run out and hit my assistant.

    NEED SOME ADVICE!

    THANK YOU!
     
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  3. preteach

    preteach Rookie

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    Sep 10, 2013

    I am having similar issues this year with a couple students :(
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 10, 2013

    Make sure they are safe from hurting themselves or anyone else. Then try to ignore the behavior. They need to calm down and sometimes too much attention during separation fits only makes it worse.
     
  5. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Sep 11, 2013

    It will pass. Eventually, if the parent and the teacher don't promote it by their reactions.

    Get the parent to kiss, hug and get out fast.

    Acknowledge the child's feelings but do not focus on it too much.

    Have pictures of the family in the room - it often helps.

    Allow the child a comfort item if they need it.

    Work on development of relationships with you and the other kids through lots of conversations and play so the child feels safe.

    Have something really fun going on so the child will want to join in the fun.

    Make the child your special friend, give them helpful tasks, etc.

    Get to know the child. Does touch help? Singing? Leaving them alone? It is different for everyone.

    Ignore as much as possible and praise when they calm down.

    A transition period where they don't have to perform a certain task or be in circle will often help. They don't want to be pushed into something too quickly.

    Sometimes calm music may help during morning arrival.

    A sensory experience may help relieve the stress - playdough, water play, sensory tables, etc.

    Patience, patience, patience.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 11, 2013

    I think it's hard for 5 year olds to differentiate between being dropped off at school and being abandoned at the train station.

    Mommy and daddy have been the one major constant in their entire lives, and suddenly they're being left in the care of a stranger. These days, lots of kid don't even have the experience of a baby sitter, having been left only with relatives when their parents aren't home. It's a huge stretch to ask them to suddenly trust their safety to a stranger.

    In fact, in that particular scenario, having the smarts to yell and scream and try to escape is probably the sign of a kid with good instincts.

    I'll let others advise you on the strategies; I don't face these particular issues with my high school kids. But I would second the suggestions for nurturing patience as they come to understand that you're no threat and that their parents will return.
     
  7. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Sep 11, 2013

    You do what works.

    Things I have done:

    *sat and held the child in the rocking chair (we did this every day for almost a week) We also did this after every break.

    *gave a squish ball to a student to keep in his pocket. I told him that every time he thought he was going to cry to squeeze the ball.

    *can the student come early, say 5 min. to transition into the room before the others?

    *a set routine at drop off.

    *the other parent drop off (we have a teacher at our school who does this. Her son cries when she takes him to school, but not when Dad does, he did this in preschool too.)

    Good luck with finding what works.
     
  8. eyeteach

    eyeteach Rookie

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    Sep 12, 2013

    The longer the parents linger, the worse it will be. Reassure the child and have them go to a quiet area to calm down. Children need to learn how to self-soothe and calm themselves down. Good luck!
     
  9. preteach

    preteach Rookie

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    Sep 12, 2013

    I ended up having 2 parents pull their children because they felt they were not ready :( I really think they just needed some time to adjust.
     
  10. jbrinkm

    jbrinkm Companion

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    Sep 13, 2013

    Have parent record themselves singing a song or reading some stories to the child. Then ask the child if they can try to calm themselves for an amount of time (short at first) and then they can listen to the recording.
     

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