Help With Student Behavior

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by tchngu, Sep 26, 2007.

  1. tchngu

    tchngu New Member

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    Sep 26, 2007

    I am an ACES Group Leader at an elementary school and have 20 kids. I need help in trying to get my kids to follow rules and to be respectful to their fellow classates when I ask them to. I have tried having them write sentences (which lasted a few times) and I have tried having them write a letter to their parents explaining what they did wrong and what they could have to toprevent what they did. This doesn't seem to work. I have even taken away any privlages as a whole for one or two that were misbehaving and this doesn't seem to work. I am out of ideas on what to do to get these kids to understand they need to follow the rules and to do what I ask them to do. Please help, I am desperate. Thank You, tchngu
     
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  3. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Sep 26, 2007

    What grade do you have?

    One thing that usually works even with my most unruly groups is to turn off the lights, make them sit with their heads down and no talking. Just sit in the front of the room and stare at them.
    Then, after 10-15 minutes of quiet, some will be ready to do something, anything, else. I also strongly recommend you get the Love and Logic info, either the teaching book or the parenting book (same principles) or the video series, and learn the techniques.

    I will also give a small candy out to the students who are listening or whatever the behavior is you want. Sometimes I will say to the one or two who are responding to my directions, "Thank you for following directions. I will have something special for you a little later." This might be extra recess time, extra free choice time in the room, or a trip to the prize box.

    I sure feel for you!Sometimes it takes a long time to get them where you want them. The Love and Logic techniques put the burden of figuring everything out on to the student, and you don't have to get emotional to get them in line.
     
  4. tchngu

    tchngu New Member

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    Sep 28, 2007

    Thank you for the info. I have 3rd and 4th grade kids, which about 12 out of the 20 really do listen. I told them I was going to bring cake in for the birthday's that I had for the month and the ones that didn't listen were going to have to eat the snack the school has for them to eat while the other kids eat the birthday cake. I have also told them will be giving out a pair of moive tickets each week by drawing a name from a hat from the ones that have been good. I do have 5 that pretty much feed off one another and I am at my witts end with these 5. I don't think there really is anything I can do for them. I have noticed a couple of them are follower's and look to another for guidance in what to do as far as being bad or good. I will check the book you told me about, thank you again, tchngu.
     
  5. IRAEnglishT-chr

    IRAEnglishT-chr Rookie

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    Sep 28, 2007

    I give out behavior tickets each Monday (3 per child) and take one away when necessary. The kids hate to lose these because they get to trade them in for small prizes/treats on Friday afternoons. It is working well for me.

    Also, I try and be very consistent. If a "good" student is talking when (s)he's supposed to be quiet, I take a ticket-- even if the student is completely shocked. If a "bad" student makes a good choice, I say, "Thank you for making good choices!" Every great once in a while I give an extra ticket to someone who demonstrates exceptional behavior.

    Once the last ticket is gone, students must write a note home to tell their parents about their behavior...the note is followed up by a call home to make sure mom/dad received it. (This hasn't actually happened yet, but the kids know this is what will happen).

    Also, for some behaviors, I take away recess time. For example, if a child misbehaves on the playground, (s)he loses some recess time. I do this because I have my class and the other fifth grade class on the playground together, so I wanted a plan I could use across the board. I can take anyone's recess time away. Sometimes, when the kids waste time and don't finish morning assignments, I have them finish up their work on the playground.

    The most important thing, I think, is to find their "currency," so to speak. What means the most to them? My kids value the trinkets they get on Fridays, their Safety Patrol Belts, and Recess Time, so I make the most of that knowledge!

    I also use positive reinforcement, like "Thank you, class! I like the way you entered the room this morning!" I have a big plastic container that I add rocks to for good behavior. On the front it says, "Good Behavior Rocks!" When the level of rocks reach a mark on the container, the class will receive something special. This time they chose a "Game Day" where they play games in every subject all day long. It's been almost six weeks, though, and the rocks haven't made it to the line yet...but almost!
     

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