Help with out of control behavior!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by tiffbabey, Nov 25, 2013.

  1. tiffbabey

    tiffbabey Rookie

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    Nov 25, 2013

    I really don't know what to do anymore. My kids will flat out ignore me when I tell them to do something and will do the opposite. They don't listen and just constantly fool around. I have a behavior system in place, but taking away recess doesn't work. Talking to parents, and taking away fun activities also hasn't worked. It's just really frustrating and I don't know how I'm going to make it through this year if something doesn't change.
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Nov 25, 2013

    It may be time to go back to the beginning of the year and retrain the group. Practice every single routine you want them to follow and repeat that practice 40 or 50 times if that's what it takes. Be prepared to give up instructional time while you are practicing routines (but you are already losing instructional time, I assume).

    Practice and practice again until every child is doing what you want them to do. This may take a whole week, but better that you get them back under control than lose the class completely.

    While you are practicing, you may want to consider some changes to your behavior plan, as well. Are you a yeller? Become a whisperer. Do you begin talking before every student has quieted down? Wait until you have the attention of each child? Do you use a punitive system (stop light, move cards, etc)? Begin using a positive reward system (Are you familiar with PBS?)

    How do you have the children seated? Can you move desks around do the friends aren't sitting next to each other? Do you do group activities on a rug near you or at their seats? The closer the children are to you, the more control you have over them.

    Just some thoughts.
     
  4. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Nov 25, 2013

    Good thoughts, swansong1! I would add: stay completely neutral. Keep your voice level, without emotion. If the students are "practicing" walking correctly in the hall, do not move forward until they are all in line properly and no one is talking. If someone talks, stop immediately and wait until it stops. If someone complains, quietly tell students that you will move on to other things when they do this correctly. You have to do this immediately and without fail, even if they mess up after doing it great for months. The minute things go wrong, stop and reteach. I have had to learn this the hard way.
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Nov 25, 2013

    I agree with reteaching the procedures and rules of the classroom. I would start with an entering the classroom procedure. How should students enter your classroom? What should they do and in what order? How do they check in? What are they supposed to do until you begin your lesson?
     
  6. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Nov 27, 2013

    Get the book The Inner Wealth Initiative: The Nurtured Heart Approach for Education.

    You will be able to apply the techniques right away and notice a big difference.

    The basic premise is that we as teachers and parents put loads of energy towards unwanted behavior. We put mild energy towards wanted behavior, because, after all, shouldn't we just expect appropriate behavior?

    Children, especially those with stressful lives, are seeking intense relationships with us. The author's theory is that if you provide intense energy to positive behavior, you will get more of the same.

    It's a quick read, and I can attest that this works even with very challenging children.
     
  7. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Nov 27, 2013

    I read very similar information about two weeks ago and it has literally turned my classroom around. I used to say, "Aaron! Stop running around and sit down! Now!" and "Thank you Lily for sitting." Now I say, "Wow! Look at how great Lily is sitting, with her hands in her lap and her eyes on me! Awesome, Lily! I love it when people sit just like that!" and "Aaron, come join us," if I speak to the rule-breaker at all.

    It is totally true that kids seek intense energy. Giving the intense energy to the well-behaved kids has helped incredibly. It hasn't solved our problems, but most kids immediately look at me to see what I am yelling about and then do the same thing, either positive or negative, to get a similar reaction. It is much better for them to want my energy and excitement for doing the positive actions! I will say, though, that a few of my kids seem to not be motivated by this energy switch at all. I'm still trying to figure out what to do with those ones.
     
  8. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Nov 28, 2013

    I'm so glad you can see a difference with this approach - it shows that you are on the right track.

    I'd highly recommend that you read the book. It outlines exactly what to do for children who have more challenging behaviors.

    These children are the ones that are most lacking in inner wealth. By highlighting their small successes, you will help them see themselves as capable, valuable young people. This is an image that has eluded them their whole lives.

    By helping difficult children take on a different perspective of themselves, you can be very influential in guiding them to make better choices in life.
     

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