Help with my first IEP meeting

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Miss Steele, Oct 22, 2005.

  1. Miss Steele

    Miss Steele Companion

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    Oct 22, 2005

    I am a first year teacher teaching preschool and my first IEP meeting is this week. The special education supervisor asked me to prepare 2 reports for the meeting. One is based on an assessment that we administered a couple of weeks ago, so I have no problem with that one. The other is observations in 5 different areas. I was wondering if anyone could give some advice on types of things to include because I am a little confused about it.

    1) Adaptive (I wrote down self-help and function next to that)
    2) Social
    3) Motor (fine and gross)
    4) PreAcademic
    5) Communication

    I feel like I should be able to do this without asking for any help. What types of things should I include for each area? Does anyone have any examples?

    Thanks so much. :)
     
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  3. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2005

    hi.
    these are not a complete list, but maybe they'll help you a little--i usually don't separate the reports completely, but use the testing and the observations together to write the report. do you have access to something like the HELP (or is that what you used?) that is a nice list to use as a springboard to help you think about the child and her/his performance

    1)some of these cross with motor, but things more like feeding--how does she/he eat--fingers, silverware, grasp on silverware, scooping motions, holding/use of a cup. handwashing, toilet use, routine--where to go when, where to go for needs (when i need to wash my hands i go to the sink, when it's time for recess i line up by the door with my classmates, etc)

    2) does he/she initiate interactions with other peers? with adults? at playtime, what does he/she typically do? preferred activities? parallel play? pretend play? does he/she have preferred peers? will he/she participate in reciprocal interactions?

    3)does he/she: jump? run? walk? fatigue easily? do stairs (and how: step over step, or both feet on one stair before the next one i cant remember the term for that now!)? fine--buttons, pencil/crayon grasp, scribbling circles, lines, scissors, zip/unzip or snap/unsnap jacket, zipper backpack,

    4) what age/level of preschool are you? how does this student do at the tasks that the other kids in the class are working on? sorting, color, shape, sizes, counting, one to one correspondence, recognizing text, how to hold a book, turn the pages, answer questions about a story. . .

    5)this is a biggie. since you didn't mention anything about the student, i'll be vague with my thoughts. my students are all nonverbal, but i write about things like gaining a listener's attention, maintaining eye contact, acknowledging greetings, giving greetings, reciprocal interaction, comprehension of vocabulary--objects, actions, etc. . . Consider both receptive and expressive language skills, whether or not your student is verbal. Receptive: does the student comprehend vocabulary? can he/she understand and follow one-step directions? two-step? associate a spoken word with an object, action, place, person. . . Expressive: how does your student greet, gain attention, does she/he communicate with one-word utterances, multiple words, sentences, will he/she initiate or only speak if spoken to--does the student use alternative communicative means? (sign, picture symbols, voice output, photographs) if so describe it and the students use of it.

    good luck--the first report is always the hardest--if you have any more questions i'd be happy to try to help

    Bethany
     
  4. Miss Steele

    Miss Steele Companion

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    Oct 23, 2005

    Thanks! That is very helpful! I almost feel like I should know this stuff and not have to ask for help, but I'd rather be prepared than look like an idiot!
     
  5. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Oct 24, 2005

    don't worry about asking questions--this is definitely something you learn as you go--happy writing!
     
  6. jcg

    jcg Cohort

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    Oct 25, 2005

    Adaptive- bathroom issues, feeding issues, dressing issues
    Social- getting along with peers and adults, following rules, do they know social standards of the community?
    Motor-scissor use and pencil use, stacking blocks, lacing, buttoning and unbuttoning, zipping, just think about what most of the other kids can do, not the high ones. Steps, hopping, running in one direction, catching a ball.
    Academic-match or name colors, rote count, meaningful count numbers, match or recognize shapes, identify concepts like above below, above, empty, full, tall, short, little, big.
    Communication-i agree with bcblue! this is a biggie! Listen to the child speak. Is the the language mixed up, what kind of articulation mistakes are they making?
    Do you have any kind of checklist or standardized test test available to You? For example the Brigance, which provide milestones that children should be reaching or the DIAL which is standardized and indicates whether children are performing above or below the typical range?
     
  7. zolar16

    zolar16 Rookie

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    Nov 3, 2005

    Well, this is what I'd put for each area:
    1) I think you're right on that one. Independence in toileting, hygiene and the cafeteria.
    2) Sharing, turn-taking, time on task, complying with adults, etc. Are the social skills of this student similar to his/her same age peers? If not, think developmentally and note what areas s/he is strong in, and which areas you'd like to see improvement in during this IEP year.
    3) Can s/he snip paper, cut, copy simple lines, trace, write independently? Can s/he walk without assitance, catch a ball, walk heel to toe on a balance beam or other straight line?
    4) Days of the week, months of the year, colors, animals, matching, sorting, 1:1 correspondence, and the like. Things you'd expect a preschooler to be learning.
    5) Requesting appropriately, refusing appropriately, following directions (1-, 2-, 3-step), and the like.
     
  8. teacherece

    teacherece Cohort

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    Nov 3, 2005

    You definitely want to get ahold of the Omnibus Guidelines for Preschool-3rd grade. This is a wonderful book that lists all domains and what child should be able to accomplish developmentally by age range and grade, etc. I believe it is from Pearson Learning. If you are interested, I'll get you the ISBN number. Do you have a form that your school uses to assess the children in developmental areas? this may help also. Good luck.
     

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