Help with AP GOV

Discussion in 'High School' started by Brendan, Sep 11, 2009.

  1. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Sep 11, 2009

    Hi all its been awhile since I taught US Government, my sons taking it online. Would anyone care to help me with a few questions...

    1) The powers of the national government to print money and maintain and arm and a navy are a) concurrent powers b) expressed c) implied d) inherent or 3) reserved. I narrowed it down to b or d and cannot decide.

    2) Which of the following is an accurate description of the process of amending
    a) Amendments may be proposed by Congress or by State Conventions
    b) " " by Congress or State Legislatures
    c) " " may be proposed by Congress or by national convention
    d) Amendments may be ratified by state conventions or by a national convention.
    e) Amendments may be ratified by state legislature or by a national convention.

    In my mind both c and e are correct? Am I right?
     
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  3. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Sep 11, 2009

    3) Relative to the notion of democratic government, the Supreme Court's use of judicial review is
    a) a limitation of democracy
    b) an implementation of democracy
    c) irrelevant
    d) usually democratic
    e) unconstitutional

    I think B is correct ( so does my son) are we correct?
     
  4. SingBlueSilver

    SingBlueSilver Companion

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    Sep 12, 2009

    1: Reserved; we can divide powers into 3 parts - Reserved, Concurrent, or Implied.
    Ex - Reserved means powers ONLY done by either the Federal Gov or State gov; Concurrent means shared; and Implied is not specifically stated in the Constitution (i.e. Education is to be taken care of by the state)
    2: E (It's too early for me and I can't explain why)
    3: A (I think because since a democratic government is ruled by the people, having a set group of selected/appointed people tell us if a law is unconstitutional or constitutional is a limit on the people's powers), as an aside, if your son is asked if the US is a Democracy, it is in actuality a Republic.

    ...I miss teaching U.S. History already...
     
  5. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Sep 12, 2009

    I thought reserved powers were ones that were reserved for the states?
     
  6. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Sep 12, 2009

    I think #1 is C....#2 is B or C

    #3 is b or d..ithink..i don't teach ap gov..but i do have civics..
    Thsi quote comes from the text:
    The powers the Constitution specifically gives to the federal government are called delegated powers. For example, only the federal government has the power to print money and control trade with other nations. The federal government also has the power to provide for the country’s defense.
     
  7. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Sep 13, 2009

    I went to the Constitution for answers.

    Question #1
    Article 1, Section 8
    The Congress shall have Power To...Coin Money...provide and maintain a Navy.
    I would answer (b) expressed.
    Reserved powers are reserved to the States or to the people (10th Amendment).
    A definition of "expressed" - to make known or set forth in words; state

    Question #2
    Article V
    The Congress...shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or on the Application of the Legislators of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments...
    I would choose answer (b) Amendments may be proposed by Congress or State Legislatures

    Question #3
    Article III, Section 2
    The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution , the Laws of the United States...to Controversies between to or more States...
    I would answer (e) unconstitutional
    Nowhere in Article III does it imply, express, or enumerate any power that gives the federal judiciary authority to interject itself into every facet of federal or state operation, which is judicial review.
    My own personal reaction to question #3 is answer (b) an implementation to democracy.

    I suspect if we ask Constitutional experts to answer question #3, we would see some lively debate.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2009
  8. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Sep 13, 2009

    I agree with you on #1..I don't know why I said implied and thought it meant stated..:dizzy:
     
  9. newbie1234

    newbie1234 Companion

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    Sep 20, 2009

    Tsk, tsk, social studies teachers!

    1) I usually call those enumerated powers, but I guess the answer they're looking for is "expressed." Those powers are explicitly enumerated, or expressed, in Art. I section 8. Reserved powers are those of the states (10th Amendment). Concurrent powers are shared by the states and federal government. Implied powers are those granted to Congress via the Necessary and Proper Clause. Inherent powers usually refer to the powers of the Executive, but generally mean powers belonging to government that are not explicitly listed in the Constitution.

    2) C. The formal amendment process is a two-part process: proposal and ratification. Proposal happens at the federal level: 2/3 vote in Congress or 2/3 of a national convention. Ratification happens among the states: 3/4 vote among state legislatures or 3/4 vote at a state convention.

    What's the difference between a Constitutional/national convention of the states (proposal) and a state convention (ratification)? It's unclear, because no amendment has ever been proposed at a national convention, therefore such a convention has never, er, convened.

    3) A. The power of judicial review is the power that SCOTUS has to declare laws of Congress unconstitutional (per Marbury v. Madison). This is undemocratic, in the strictest sense of the term, because it's the power of 9 Justices (who are appointed, not elected, and sit on the Court for life) to do away with laws that were made by elected officials (Congress).

    Madison designed the Court to be undemocratic. He and the framers envisioned a panel of legal experts who were unmoved by changing political trends, and instead faithfully applied the principles of the U.S. Constitution.
     
  10. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Sep 20, 2009

    Correct Answers

    1) b
    2) c
    3) b
     
  11. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2009

    Interesting that none of us got a 100%. No fair guessing two possible answers to a question.

    For question number 3, I consulted the writings of a Constitutional lawyer. The opinion was the power claimed by the court in judicial review was unconstitutional. (answer e).

    There is great disagreement and debate across the land regarding the Constitution. Many say it is a living document meaning it changes with the times. Many say the intent of the Founding Fathers guides the interpretation of the Constitution. Both sides have their arguments.
     
  12. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I understand question three though. Since judicial review is taking power out of the hands of the people, I easily can see why it is considered a "limitation of democracy."
     
  13. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I wonder if this is perhaps a problem that such questions seem to be so open to interpretation, and yet students are expected to come up with one right answer. Is that fair?

    Interesting. Those sort of questions seem quite a bit different than those on the AP History tests.
     
  14. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I totally agree. That question should be struck imo. I am the teachers department chair, but I don't feel comfortable speaking with him because I found the information out through my son.
     
  15. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Sep 20, 2009

    Well as far as powers..as I said..I teach civics and we have reservered, delegated, and concurrent. We never discuss expressed or any other terminology with the powers given by Congress to the federal and state governments.

    Sometimes when you don't teach a specific thing, regardless of being ss teachers, you may forget them. I was merely giving options to which it could be-so yes, I can give to answers, I'm not taking the test, just merely voicing my opinion from the information that I know. ...Never claimed to be 100% right.
     
  16. newbie1234

    newbie1234 Companion

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    Sep 21, 2009

    Judicial review isn't unconstitutional. It's the Court's authority to determine whether or not a law of Congress is in accord with the U.S. Constitution. That's not controversial and hasn't been since Marbury v. Madison. It's not really up for interpretation.

    Those three are pretty standard AP Gov questions. In fact, they may be from released exams.
     

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